Sponsored by
PuffItUp VapeFully Dynavap Vaposhop
  1. Welcome to VaporAsylum! Please take a moment to read our RULES and introduce yourself here.
    Dismiss Notice
  2. Did you know we have lots of smilies for you to use?
    Dismiss Notice
  3. Did you know that you have two different customized styles/themes to view VaporAsylum in?
    Change your style here.
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Need help navigating the forum? Find out how to use our features here.
    Dismiss Notice

Meds Cannabis for Memory or Dementia

Discussion in 'Why Do You Medicate?' started by momofthegoons, May 9, 2017.

  1. momofthegoons

    momofthegoons Vapor Accessory Addict Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,887
    Likes Received:
    42,643
    Trophy Points:
    703
    CAN MARIJUANA RESTORE MEMORY? NEW STUDY SHOWS CANNABIS CAN REVERSE COGNITIVE DECLINE IN MICE
    By Hannah Osborne On Monday, May 8, 2017 - 11:00

    [​IMG]
    Marijuana plants are seen at Ganja Farms marijuana store in Bogota, Colombia, February 10, 2016. THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, has been shown to reverse cognitive decline in old mice. Photo: John Vizcaino/Reuters


    Marijuana appears to improve the memory and learning abilities of old mice. Scientists discovered low doses of its main psychoactive ingredient—cannabinoid THC—can reverse the age-related decline in cognitive abilities, a finding that could lead to scientists figuring out a way of slowing brain aging in humans.

    Researchers are increasingly examining THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) for its potential medical benefits. In the U.K., Oxford University recently launched a £10 million ($13 million) program to “identify new medical therapies through research into the molecular, cellular and systems mechanisms of cannabinoids.” Meanwhile, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has now approved several medications derived from THC.

    Many scientists are currently looking at its potential use as a treatment for neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease.

    Subscribe to Newsweek from $1 per week

    In a study published in Nature Medicine on Monday, researchers led by Andreas Zimmer, from the University of Bonn, Germany, have shown how THC can provide significant benefits to mice when it comes to age-related cognitive decline.

    THC interacts with receptors in the brain’s endocannabinoid system, which is involved in many physiological functions, including pain, mood, memory and appetite. Previous research has also shown activity in the endocannabinoid system declines as we get older, indicating it plays a role in the progression of aging.

    To study what effect THC has on the aging brain, scientists gave low doses of THC to mice at three different life stages—two months, 12 months and 18 months. The latter two groups represented mature and old age.

    The team carried out three experiments. The first involved a water maze, where mice have to learn and then remember how to navigate their way to the end. In a control group, mature and old mice performed worse than the young group. However, when treated with THC, the older groups improved at the task, while the young mice fared far worse. (The study’s authors noted that this was in “good agreement with the known detrimental effects of THC on cognition in young animals and humans.”

    Next, they created a task where mice had to locate a specific object. Older mice treated with THC performed to the same standard as young mice that had not been given the drug. A third test relating to partner recognition also showed THC led to improved memory in mature and older mice. “Together, these results reveal a profound, long-lasting improvement of cognitive performance resulting from a low dose of THC treatment in mature and old animals,” the scientists write.

    Further research showed what might cause the improvement, with THC appearing to restore hippocampal gene transcription patterns—activity in the brain relating to memory and learning—to a similar state seen in young mice.

    The team argues that while they do not yet know if these findings would be same in humans, it could lead to new treatments to prevent cognitive decline in older people: “Cannabis preparations and THC are used for medicinal purposes,” they write. “They have an excellent safety record and do not produce adverse side-effects when administered at a low dose to older individuals. Thus, chronic, low-dose treatment with THC or cannabis extracts could be a potential strategy to slow down or even to reverse cognitive decline in the elderly.”

    Zameel Cader, associate professor in clinical neurosciences at Oxford University, is involved in the institution’s $13 million cannabis research project. Commenting on the Nature Medicine study, he tells Newsweek the paper is “very interesting on a number of levels.”

    “First of all there’s clearly growing interest in the potential therapeutic role of cannabinoids and in this particular case THC on various human conditions,” he says. “This paper is addressing a possible role for that compound in memory and cognition, which is relevant to disorders such as Alzheimer’s and other dementias.”

    He said that while it is important to remember the study was carried out on mouse models, the differences in the effect of the drug on younger animals versus older animals tells us a lot about our understanding of the differences between old and young brains.

    Moving this research forward, however, will be problematic: “Testing in humans is going to be difficult. This is a challenge faced by anyone wanting to develop a therapy for a human disorder such as dementia. Human lifespan is very extensive. So the question would be, when would be the most appropriate time to give these kinds of medications? Over what period of time do you need to evaluate the effects? In humans it could be years before an effect is noticed.”

    “Finally, there is the issue surrounding safety. With a cannabinoid like THC, which does have adverse effects in certain individuals, there would be worries about the chronic dosing of this kind of medicine. We would need to assess the safety first before going into seeing whether it would improve cognition."
     
  2. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,406
    Likes Received:
    12,342
    Trophy Points:
    683
    Location:
    Maryland
    Great article.....wait, what?....oh, great article.....oh, damn...what were we talking about...oh, great article....LOL
     
  3. momofthegoons

    momofthegoons Vapor Accessory Addict Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,887
    Likes Received:
    42,643
    Trophy Points:
    703
  4. momofthegoons

    momofthegoons Vapor Accessory Addict Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,887
    Likes Received:
    42,643
    Trophy Points:
    703
    Cannabis could cure dementia, says joint Israeli-German study

    (JNS.org) A joint Israeli-German study has found that the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), may offer a cure for dementia.

    Medical cannabis at Israel’s third annual CannaTech conference in March 2017. Credit: Adam Abrams.

    [​IMG]
    Medical cannabis at Israel’s third annual CannaTech conference in March 2017. Credit: Adam Abrams.

    The study, conducted by scientists at Germany’s University of Bonn and Israel’s Hebrew University of Jerusalem, discovered that THC improves cognitive functioning and memory performance when administered in small controlled doses in old mice.

    The study also discovered that administering THC created an increased number of links between nerve cells in the brain, a crucial prerequisite for learning.

    The findings may contribute to the development of new treatments for human cognitive disorders, most notably dementia.

    “The treatment completely reversed the loss of performance in the old animals,” said Prof. Andreas Zimmer of Bonn University’s Institute of Molecular Psychiatry.

    “The THC treatment induced molecular and epigenetic changes, which no longer corresponded to that of untreated old animals, but rather were similar to what we see in young animals,” said Hebrew University researcher Dr. Mona Dvir-Ginzberg.

    Researchers now hope to conduct clinical trials to find out whether or not THC has the same positive effect in humans.

    Hebrew University professor Raphael Mechoulam initially discovered THC in the 1960s. Since then, Israeli hospitals have demonstrated a willingness to perform clinical trials on the effectiveness of cannabis in relieving the symptoms of tens of thousands of patients suffering from chronic or terminal conditions.
     
  5. momofthegoons

    momofthegoons Vapor Accessory Addict Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,887
    Likes Received:
    42,643
    Trophy Points:
    703
    Daily cannabis dose helps improve mice memories

    SCIENTISTS at the University of Bonn in Germany have found a small daily dose of cannabis could slow down the decline of cognitive failure associated with ageing.

    As part of a study investing the aging process of the brain, the researchers found the chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) which gives users a high, has been found to improve memory and learning in older mice.

    The researchers tested the effects of the drug on mice at several different stages in life and found lower doses of THC impaired that of younger mice, but boosted the brain performance in older rodents.

    After 28 days of treatment with THC, the older mice made cognitive leaps and bounds as they regained the memory and learning skills of healthy younger mice.

    Dr Andras Bilkei-Gorzo Bilkei-Gorzo and his team monitored the brain performance in mice aged two months, 12 months and 18 months.

    After studying the cognitive function of the older mice who had been given a daily dose of cannabis, they found the animals memory and learning skills matched those of young mice who had not been given anything.

    A report which appeared in a recent edition of respected journal Nature Medicine, revealed the mice aged two months and 18 months were tested to see how fast they could solve a water maze puzzle, and how quickly they could register familiar objects.

    Without a daily dose of THC, the younger mice completed the tests with ease, while the older ones struggled to recognise mice they had previously met and solve the mental challenge.

    However, while researchers hope this development could benefit those with dementia in the future, they are proceeding with scientific caution.

    The research group said they are now planning on testing via a small-scale study on humans aged 60 to 70-years later in 2017.

    No doubt they will have loads of volunteers offering to participate.

     
    Baron23 and Madri-Gal like this.
  6. momofthegoons

    momofthegoons Vapor Accessory Addict Staff Member

    Messages:
    8,887
    Likes Received:
    42,643
    Trophy Points:
    703
    STUDY INDICATES MEDICINAL CANNABIS IMPROVES LIVES OF DEMENTIA PATIENTS

    A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Cannabis and Cannabinoids indicates that medicinal cannabis may greatly improved behaviour problems and daily care in severely demented patients.

    Around 5 out of 6 patients with dementia develop behavioural and psychological symptoms, which can greatly impact quality of life for the patients and their carers. Psychotropic medications are often used to treat these symptoms, but the majority of patients see little effect and experience negative side effects.

    This study, conducted in Geneva, Switzerland, included ten patients with dementia experiencing severe behavioural problems. They were treated with three THC/CBD formulations, with increasing levels of THC.

    Over the span of two months, behavioural indications decreased by 40%, and rigidity by 50%. Half of the patients decreased or stopped other psychotropic medications. Not only did this improve the quality of life of the patients, but staff at the aged care centre indicated these results made daily care and transfers easier, improved direct contact, improved behaviour, and decreased side effects of opioids such as constipation.

    While this was a small study, it indicates that results of larger studies, such as MGC Pharma and UNDA’s Phase IIb currently ongoing, may show significant results.
     
  7. Madri-Gal

    Madri-Gal Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,725
    Likes Received:
    9,803
    Trophy Points:
    353
    high-rat_a49306f8.jpg
    Now I remember....
     
    momofthegoons likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice