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Meds CBD

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Know your medicine!

The risk of contaminants and false labeling in the exploding CBD industry

WASHINGTON (ABC7/WJLA) — The cannabis derivative, CBD, is popping up everywhere — lip balm, body cream and even as a shot in your morning espresso.

But not all CBD is created equal.

The ABC7 I-Team has been given exclusive access to the largest set of test results and analysis on CBD products to date. Those tests reveal not only potential dangers, but also patently false claims plaguing the industry.

"Bad players are really messing the industry up for everyone, including good players," said Jason Cranford as we walked through his 30,000 square foot indoor cannabis grow operation in the Colorado Rockies.


"If it's not USDA Organic certified, and it's not full panel lab tested, you have no way of knowing what you're getting," said Cranford, who's been producing CBD long before it was en vogue.

"We grow the plants, we do the extractions, and then we do the infusing and the bottling from seed to sell," said Cranford, whose farm is USDA regulated and certified organic.

He tests and tracks every batch made and knows exactly what's in his products.

But most consumers, he says, don't know what's in theirs.

"Overseas they use hemp to do cover crops. They use it to purposely suck out the pesticides and heavy metals on soil there so they can plant food crops next," Cranford said.

These crops are being imported into the US and people are making CBD out of it. The really scary part is when you have these contaminants in your plant material, and you make this oil, you're concentrating it.
About 70 percent of U.S. hemp is from China.

The cannabis derivative is believed to have medical benefits. At high doses, it's under clinical investigation to control epilepsy and at low doses believed useful for a host of issues including pain, inflammation, and insomnia.

And with the CBD frenzy just beginning, concerns are mounting over the lack of regulation in an industry expected to hit $22 billion a year by 2022.

"You have an industry that has a rampant quality control issue," Dr. Sean Callan said.

Callan leads the team at Ellipse Analytics that tested top-selling CBD products for contaminants and truth in labeling.

"Comparing this to other supplements that we've tested, we found really high levels of pesticides, really high levels of heavy metals," Callan said.

The lab tested the top-selling 240 products for 300 contaminants and for truth in labeling.

Was the amount of CBD claimed actually in the product?

After thousands of tests, 70 percent of products were found "highly contaminated" with heavy metals like lead and arsenic, herbicides like glyphosate (the active ingredient in RoundUp) and a host of other contaminants including pesticides, BPA and toxic mold.

One product — by Ananda Hemp — contained levels of lead so high, it exceeded by 100times what the EPA would consider actionable for drinking water. In a statement, Hemp said it “adheres to extremely stringent quality control processes and practices for all of its products.”

The research found what was on the bottle was sometimes as troubling as what was in it.

Because hemp-derived CBD is an unregulated industry, makers are not required to test for CBD content.

"They have to test for the THC content because there's a federal law," Callan said, "but there's no rule that says you have to actually test your CBD content."

More than half the products tested had labels that inaccurately reflected the concentration of CBD in the product.

"There were several that claimed to have CBD on the label where we found no CBD whatsoever," Callan said. "All the way up to, on the other end of the spectrum, there are products that have five, six times as much CBD in them as they say they do."

This has created a "buyer beware" marketplace that has national pro-cannabis organizations also becoming pro-regulation.

"It's incredibly difficult for consumers to navigate these unregulated products," said Jenn Michelle Pedini, who's the Virginia Executive Director for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML.

"Study after study is showing these products very rarely contain what would be a therapeutic level of cannabidiol or even the amount of CBD that's indicated on the label," Pedini said.

Virginia Commonwealth University, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and other medical journals have published studies that reflect similar outcomes to the hundreds of tests done by Ellipse Analytics, citing contamination, false labeling and false claims.

VCU even discovered the compound 5F-ADB, known to be in street drugs like K2 and Spice — making purchases confusing and potentially dangerous for consumers, and for producers like Cranford, putting the reputation of a young industry in peril.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Remember this post? Well......
I've put author information for credibility.


That Study Where Mice Died From CBD Is Bullshit

JUN 19, 2019 03:59 PM PST
by RANDY ROBINSON
1560974384473_micexCBDxliverstudy__WIDE.jpg

Some mice died from CBD in a recent study. Thing is, the researchers weren’t honest about their methods, and liver toxicity from CBD isn’t exactly news, either.

A recent study from the University of Arkansas, where mice died after being given CBD, may change the public’s perception of CBD. But probably not.

The study dosed mice on CBD to see what would happen to the little guys’ livers. Some of these mice died within 24 hours of being administered CBD, which prompted frightening headlines such as “Marijuana Study Finds CBD Can Cause Liver Damage” and “New Mouse Study Finds Level of Liver Toxicity for CBD.”

Should we start saying no to CBD? Before we ditch those hemp pre-rolls that can’t even get us lit, let’s look at how the study was conducted.

Because mice are much smaller than humans, the researchers “allometrically scaled” the doses so they were proportional to human doses. The thing is, the researchers scaled the doses in the wrong direction.

Dose scaling was based off the “maximum recommended human maintenance” amount for Epidiolex in human patients, the first and only FDA-approved CBD drug derived from cannabis. That dose is 20mg/kg. So we’d expect the dose for the mice to be much, much smaller, somewhere in the range of 0.3mg/kg.

The researchers instead dosed the mice on 0, 246, 738, or 2460mg/kg. Yeah, you read that correctly: at the higher end, the mice got 120 times the recommended dose for a full-grown human being.

So no shit the mice got liver damage and died.

The University of Arkansas study pulled the same kind of bad science we saw back in the 1970s, when Dr. Heath erroneously (and unethically) concluded that marijuana caused brain damage in rhesus monkeys — after forcibly suffocating the poor simians with weed smoke.


To the Arkansas researchers’ credit, their study does offer additional evidence that CBD can wreck the liver and potentially compromise people with hepatic diseases or who rely on medications to stay alive. But that’s not exactly news. Earlier this month, during the FDA’s public hearing on CBD, several doctors and toxicologists testified that CBD could cause health complications in certain people, especially at high doses.

Even the Arkansas study’s lead researcher, Igor Koturbash, admitted to this previous knowledge in an interview.

“If you look at the Epidiolex label, it clearly states a warning for liver injury,” he told Nutra Ingredients USA. “It states you have to monitor the liver enzyme levels of the patients. In clinical trials, 5 percent to 20 percent of the patients developed elevated liver enzymes, and some patients were withdrawn from the trials.”

Furthermore, although rodent studies are useful for determining a drug’s toxicity, mice aren’t humans. They have different physiologies and different metabolic systems than us. They don’t process drugs the same way humans do, and, to date, there have been no recorded instances of someone dying because they chugged a liter of CBD mocktail.

What’s the takeaway here? Besides exposing the University of Arkansas’s shoddy scientific methods, we should probably think twice before infusing every ingredient of every meal with CBD (along with slathering ourselves in CBD lotions, soaps, shampoos, face masks, creams, and underarm deodorants). Having too much of a good thing is real, even when it comes from cannabis.

But don’t blindly buy into the Reefer Madness-esque hype, either.


Randy Robinson
Based in Denver, Randy studied cannabinoid science while getting a degree in molecular biology at the University of Colorado.

 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
Remember this post? Well......
I've put author information for credibility.


That Study Where Mice Died From CBD Is Bullshit

JUN 19, 2019 03:59 PM PST
by RANDY ROBINSON
View attachment 10550
Some mice died from CBD in a recent study. Thing is, the researchers weren’t honest about their methods, and liver toxicity from CBD isn’t exactly news, either.

A recent study from the University of Arkansas, where mice died after being given CBD, may change the public’s perception of CBD. But probably not.

The study dosed mice on CBD to see what would happen to the little guys’ livers. Some of these mice died within 24 hours of being administered CBD, which prompted frightening headlines such as “Marijuana Study Finds CBD Can Cause Liver Damage” and “New Mouse Study Finds Level of Liver Toxicity for CBD.”

Should we start saying no to CBD? Before we ditch those hemp pre-rolls that can’t even get us lit, let’s look at how the study was conducted.

Because mice are much smaller than humans, the researchers “allometrically scaled” the doses so they were proportional to human doses. The thing is, the researchers scaled the doses in the wrong direction.

Dose scaling was based off the “maximum recommended human maintenance” amount for Epidiolex in human patients, the first and only FDA-approved CBD drug derived from cannabis. That dose is 20mg/kg. So we’d expect the dose for the mice to be much, much smaller, somewhere in the range of 0.3mg/kg.

The researchers instead dosed the mice on 0, 246, 738, or 2460mg/kg. Yeah, you read that correctly: at the higher end, the mice got 120 times the recommended dose for a full-grown human being.

So no shit the mice got liver damage and died.

The University of Arkansas study pulled the same kind of bad science we saw back in the 1970s, when Dr. Heath erroneously (and unethically) concluded that marijuana caused brain damage in rhesus monkeys — after forcibly suffocating the poor simians with weed smoke.


To the Arkansas researchers’ credit, their study does offer additional evidence that CBD can wreck the liver and potentially compromise people with hepatic diseases or who rely on medications to stay alive. But that’s not exactly news. Earlier this month, during the FDA’s public hearing on CBD, several doctors and toxicologists testified that CBD could cause health complications in certain people, especially at high doses.

Even the Arkansas study’s lead researcher, Igor Koturbash, admitted to this previous knowledge in an interview.

“If you look at the Epidiolex label, it clearly states a warning for liver injury,” he told Nutra Ingredients USA. “It states you have to monitor the liver enzyme levels of the patients. In clinical trials, 5 percent to 20 percent of the patients developed elevated liver enzymes, and some patients were withdrawn from the trials.”

Furthermore, although rodent studies are useful for determining a drug’s toxicity, mice aren’t humans. They have different physiologies and different metabolic systems than us. They don’t process drugs the same way humans do, and, to date, there have been no recorded instances of someone dying because they chugged a liter of CBD mocktail.

What’s the takeaway here? Besides exposing the University of Arkansas’s shoddy scientific methods, we should probably think twice before infusing every ingredient of every meal with CBD (along with slathering ourselves in CBD lotions, soaps, shampoos, face masks, creams, and underarm deodorants). Having too much of a good thing is real, even when it comes from cannabis.

But don’t blindly buy into the Reefer Madness-esque hype, either.


Randy Robinson
Based in Denver, Randy studied cannabinoid science while getting a degree in molecular biology at the University of Colorado.
Thanks for the article, @momofthegoons.
I was asked today how my dogs handled the Fourth if July fireworks, by an elderly woman who had volunteered all week at the animal shelter. She said every dog there was calm, and every dog had been given CBD. She suggested that I visit a dispensary, and get some dog treats for my dogs, and let me know CBD was "a miracle" for people too. I do love hearing about cannabis from people in the wild. As there are those that are still setting off fireworks, I'll get something for my furry friends. Word is spreading, and it's fun to be encouraged to try cannabis.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
More on drug interactions with CBD....

DRUG-DRUG INTERACTIONS WITH CANNABIDIOL (CBD)

What is the “Mechanism of Action?”

CBD is a safe, non-intoxicating, and non-addictive cannabis compound with significant therapeutic attributes, but CBD-drug interactions may be problematic in some cases. CBD and other plant cannabinoids can potentially interact with many pharmaceuticals by inhibiting the activity of the liver’s enzyme system responsible for metabolizing 90% of drugs and other foreign substances (the Cytochrome P-450 System). This leads to higher levels of the drug in your system at one time, which can cause unwanted side effects and even overdose. Thus, if you are taking a drug affected by CBD, you may need a dosage adjustment in order to take both drugs safely. With CBD poised to become widely available in pharmaceutical, nutraceutical, and herbal preparations, medical scientists are taking a closer look at CBD-drug interactions.

When CBD or any other foreign compound enters the body, they are metabolized. This process is generally very complicated. Metabolizing something properly can involve multiple molecular pathways and various enzymes that enable the body to get rid of the compound (often done by adding chemical group(s) to the original compound). Or, metabolism can entail breaking down a compound into a more basic molecule that the body then uses.

Products of a drug’s metabolism are called its metabolites. These metabolites can have very different properties than the initial drug. Ethanol, for example, owes some of its effects, including much of the hangover, to its two-step metabolism. The buildup of acetaldehyde in the liver (ethanol is first converted to acetaldehyde) is a major reason for ethanol’s liver toxicity and the nausea and vomiting caused by excessive consumption.

What is the Cytochrome P-450 System?

The Cytochrome P-450 enzyme system is a system within the liver that is responsible for metabolizing 90 percent of the drugs and foreign substances we consume. This system contains more than 50 enzymes that process and eliminate toxins. It is also essential for the production of cholesterol, steroids, prostacyclins, and thromboxane A2. Of the more than 50 CYP450 enzymes, the CYP1A2, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, CYP3A4, and CYP3A5 enzymes metabolize 90 percent of drugs with the two most significant enzymes being CYP3A4 and CYP2D6. These enzymes are predominantly expressed in the liver, but also occur in the small intestine (reducing drug bioavailability), lungs, placenta, and kidneys.

Cytochrome P-450 enzymes can be inhibited or induced by drugs, resulting in clinically significant drug-drug interactions that can cause unanticipated adverse reactions or therapeutic failures. Interactions with warfarin, antidepressants, antiepileptic drugs, and statins often involve the Cytochrome P-450 enzymes. Knowledge of drugs metabolized by Cytochrome P-450 enzymes, as well as the most potent inhibiting and inducing drugs, can help minimize the possibility of drug interactions as well as adverse drug reactions.

In addition, genetic variability (polymorphisms) in these enzymes may influence a patient's response to commonly prescribed drug classes.

Further, certain drugs affect “processing times” within the Cytochrome P450 system, thus making other drugs metabolize faster or slower than they would by themselves. Similarly, if the system is unhealthy because of liver problems or other pre-existing conditions, drugs may not metabolize as they should. This may lead to elevated and potentially toxic blood levels.

Metabolizing Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)

THC metabolites contribute significantly to the effects of Cannabis. Eleven-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), for example, is a THC metabolite that activates the CB1 cannabinoid receptor in the brain and induces a high that may be greater than that of THC itself. This means that the body’s metabolism of THC can make it more potent.

Different routes of cannabinoid administration have different effects. Inhaled THC enters capillaries in the lungs, passes into general circulation through the pulmonary arteries, and quickly crosses the blood-brain barrier. When ingested orally, however, THC is absorbed in the small intestine and then carried to the liver, where it is metabolized by subclasses of Cytochrome P450, specifically the CYP2C and CYP3A enzymes. These liver enzymes also metabolize CBD, converting it into 7-OH-CBD and 6-OH-CBD. But there has been relatively little research into the properties of these CBD metabolites.

Metabolizing Cannabidiol (CBD)

The way CBD interacts with Cytochrome P-450 is pivotal; they deactivate each other. Preclinical research shows that CBD is metabolized by Cytochrome P450 enzymes while functioning as a “competitive inhibitor” of the same liver enzymes. By occupying the site of enzymatic activity, CBD displaces its chemical competitors and prevents Cytochrome P-450 from metabolizing other compounds.

The extent to which CBD behaves as a competitive inhibitor of Cytochrome P450 depends on how tightly CBD binds to the active site of the metabolic enzyme before and after oxidation. This can change greatly, depending on how—and how much—CBD is administered, the unique attributes of the individual taking this medication, and whether isolated CBD or a whole plant remedy is used.

If the dosage of CBD is low enough, it will have no noticeable effect on CYP activity, but CBD may still exert other effects. There is no clearly established cut-off dose, below which CBD does not interact with other drugs.

How do CBD-generated changes in Cytochrome P-450 activity impact the metabolic breakdown of THC? Animal studies indicate that CBD pretreatment modifies brain levels of THC. That’s because CBD, functioning as a competitive inhibitor of Cytochrome P450, slows down the conversion of THC into its more potent metabolite, 11-OH-THC. Consequently, THC remains active for a longer duration, but the peak of the extended buzz is blunted somewhat under the influence of CBD.

Grapefruit and Ganja

Lester Bornheim, a research pharmacologist at the University of California in San Francisco, was among the first scientists to study the metabolism of CBD. In 1987, he was awarded a NIDA grant to investigate the effects of Phyto-cannabinoids on Cytochrome P-450 enzymes. THC and Cannabinol (CBN) also inhibit CYP activity, but CBD, of all the plant cannabinoids studied, is the strongest Cytochrome P-450 deactivator.

In 1999, Bornheim addressed the annual gathering of the International Cannabinoid Research Society (ICRS) and drew attention to the possibility that CBD could interfere with the metabolism of many medications. A year earlier, a team of Canadian scientists identified certain compounds in grapefruit that inhibit the expression of some Cytochrome P-450 enzymes—which is why physicians often warn patients not to eat grapefruit before taking their medications. CBD, it turns out, is a more potent inhibitor of Cytochrome P450 enzymes than the grapefruit compound Bergapten (the strongest of several grapefruit components that inhibit CYPs).

What does this mean in practical terms for a medical marijuana patient on a CBD-rich treatment regimen who takes a prescription blood-thinner like Warfarin, for example? CBD reduces the enzymatic degradation of Warfarin, thereby increasing its duration of action and effect. A person taking a CBD-rich product should pay close attention to changes in blood levels of Warfarin, and adjust dosage accordingly as instructed by their doctor and pharmacist.

CYPs In Cancer and Epilepsy

In cancer treatment, the precise dosing of chemotherapy is considered to be extremely important. Doctors often struggle to find the maximum dose that will not be catastrophically toxic. Many chemotherapy agents are oxidized by CYPs before their inactivation or excretion. This means that for patients using CBD, the same dose of chemotherapy may produce higher blood concentrations. If CBD inhibits the Cytochrome-mediated metabolism of the chemotherapy and dosage adjustments aren’t made, the chemotherapy agent could accumulate within the body to highly toxic levels.

However, there have been few reported adverse cannabinoid-drug interactions among the many cancer patients who use cannabis to cope with the wrenching side effects of chemotherapy. It is possible that whole plant cannabis, with its rich compensatory synergies, interacts differently than the isolated CBD that is administered in most research settings. As well, the cytoprotective effects of the cannabinoids may mitigate some of the chemotherapeutic toxicity.

Some epileptic patients have encountered issues with how CBD interacts with their anti-seizure medication. A small clinical study at Massachusetts General Hospital involving children with refractory epilepsy found that CBD elevated the plasma levels and increased the long-term blood concentrations of an anticonvulsant. A majority of these children needed to have their dose reduced due to side effects. Given that both the anti-seizure drug and CBD are metabolized by Cytochrome P450 enzymes, a drug-drug interaction is not surprising.

Dr. Bonni Goldstein has observed cases in which small doses of high-CBD/low-THC cannabis oil concentrate seemed to aggravate seizure disorders rather than quell them. How could this happen, given CBD’s renown anti-epileptic properties?

A 1992 review by Lester Bornheim and his colleagues indicated that CBD inhibits some Cytochrome P-450 enzymes at smaller doses than what is required for CBD to exert an anti-epileptic effect. This means that a certain dose of CBD could alter the processing of an anti-epileptic drug taken by the patient, but this amount of CBD might not be enough to provide any anti-epileptic relief itself. The advice some physicians offer in this situation may seem counterintuitive: Increase the dose of CBD—perhaps even add a little more THC (or THCA, the raw, unheated, non-psychoactive version of THC)—and this may be more effective for seizure control.

Drugs That Interact with Cannabidiol

Any drug metabolized by Cytochrome P-450 enzymes could potentially interact with Cannabidiol. According to the Indiana University Department of Medicine, drugs known to use the Cytochrome P-450 system include:

• Steroids
• HMG CoA reductase inhibitors (Statins)
• Calcium Channel Blockers
• Antihistamines
• Prokinetics
• HIV Antivirals
• Immune Modulators
• Benzodiazepines
• Anti-Arrhythmics
• Antibiotics
• Anesthetics
• Anti-Psychotics
• Anti-Depressants
• Anti-Epileptics
• Beta Blockers
• Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs)
• NSAIDs
• Angiotensin II Blockers
• Oral Hypoglycemic Agents
• Sulfonylureas

Keep in mind that this list does not necessarily contain every medication that could be affected by Cannabidiol. Likewise, not every medication in each of the categories listed will cause an interaction. For this reason, you should consult with a Pharmacist or Physician prior to taking any combination of drugs at the same time. Alternative medications or dosage adjustments of current medications may be required. If you are worried that your P-450 enzyme system may not be functioning properly, physicians can test the system to ensure that the medications you take are metabolizing as expected.
 

Chandler

Member
Damn near 2 years since anyone discuss cbd!

At first I thought it was a great way to market weak herbs. I've had cbd strains lately that were very nice. Recently I discovered a trusted place that sells cbd carts. Anti anxiety,/stress, relaxation! Positive medicine. More effective than other 510 carts I've had access to.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
FDA warns company marketing unapproved cannabidiol products with unsubstantiated claims to treat cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, opioid withdrawal, pain and pet anxiety
Agency is expediting work to evaluate regulatory policies related to cannabis and cannabis-derived ingredients like CBD

Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced that it has issued a warning letter to Curaleaf Inc., of Wakefield, Massachusetts, for illegally selling unapproved products containing cannabidiol (CBD) online with unsubstantiated claims that the products treat cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, opioid withdrawal, pain and pet anxiety, among other conditions or diseases.

“As we examine potential regulatory pathways for the lawful marketing of products containing cannabis and cannabis-derived compounds like CBD, protecting and promoting public health remains our top priority. Selling unapproved products with unsubstantiated therapeutic claims — such as claims that CBD products can treat serious diseases and conditions — can put patients and consumers at risk by leading them to put off important medical care. Additionally, there are many unanswered questions about the science, safety, effectiveness and quality of unapproved products containing CBD,” said Acting FDA Commissioner Ned Sharpless, M.D. “Today’s action demonstrates that the agency stands firm in its commitment to continue monitoring the marketplace and protecting the public health by taking action as needed against companies that deceive consumers and put them at risk by illegally selling products marketed for therapeutic uses for which they are not approved, such as those claiming to treat cancer or Alzheimer’s disease. Consumers should beware of purchasing or using any such products.”

Given the interest in products containing cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds, and CBD in particular, the FDA has and continues to take an agency-wide, integrated, and collaborative approach to addressing the regulation of products made from CBD that fall under its jurisdiction. The agency has established a high-level internal working group to explore potential pathways for various types of CBD products to be lawfully marketed. An important component of this work is obtaining and evaluating information to address outstanding questions related to the safety of CBD products that will inform the agency’s consideration of potential regulatory frameworks for CBD while maintaining the FDA’s rigorous public health standards. As part of that work, the FDA held a public hearing in May, and opened a docket for written comments, to obtain scientific data and information about the safety, manufacturing, product quality, marketing, labeling and sale of products containing cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds.

“We will continue to work to protect the health and safety of American consumers from products that are being marketed in violation of the law through actions like those the FDA is taking today. At the same time, we also recognize the potential opportunities and significant interest in drug and other consumer products containing CBD,” said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner Amy Abernethy, M.D., Ph.D. “We understand this is an important national issue with public health impact and of interest to American hemp farmers and many other stakeholders. The agency has a well-established pathway for drug development and drug approvals, and we remain committed to evaluating the agency’s regulatory policies related to other types of CBD products. We plan to report our progress by early this fall as we expedite our work to address the many questions about CBD. The step-wise, science-based approach we’re taking protects patients and the public health, fosters innovation for safe and appropriate products, and promotes consumer confidence.”

As described in the warning letter issued to Curaleaf, the company used product webpages, its online store and social media websites to make unfounded claims about more than a dozen different CBD products. Examples of the unsupported and unapproved claims made by the company include:

“CBD has been demonstrated to have properties that counteract the growth of [and/or] spread of cancer.”
“CBD was effective in killing human breast cancer cells.” • “CBD has also been shown to be effective in treating Parkinson’s disease.”
“CBD has been linked to the effective treatment of Alzheimer’s disease ….”
“CBD is being adopted more and more as a natural alternative to pharmaceutical-grade treatments for depression and anxiety.”
“CBD can also be used in conjunction with opioid medications, and a number of studies have demonstrated that CBD can in fact reduce the severity of opioid-related withdrawal and lessen the buildup of tolerance.”
“CBD oil is becoming a popular, all-natural source of relief used to address the symptoms of many common conditions, such as chronic pain, anxiety … ADHD.”
“What are the benefits of CBD oil? …. Some of the most researched and well-supported hemp oil uses include …. Anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorders, and even schizophrenia …. Chronic pain from fibromyalgia, slipped spinal discs . . . Eating disorders and addiction . . ..”
“[V]ets will prescribe puppy Xanax to pet owners which can help in certain instances but is not necessarily a desirable medication to give your dog continually. Whereas CBD oil is natural and offers similar results without the use of chemicals.”
“For dogs experiencing pain, spasms, anxiety, nausea or inflammation often associated with cancer treatments, CBD (aka cannabidiol) may be a source of much-needed relief.”
The FDA has requested responses from Curaleaf within 15 working days stating how the violations will be corrected. Failure to correct the violations promptly may result in legal action, including product seizure and injunction.

The agency continues to be concerned at the proliferation of products asserting to contain CBD that are marketed for therapeutic or medical uses that have not been approved by the FDA. The FDA approval process ensures that drugs on the market are safe and effective for their intended therapeutic uses. CBD is marketed in a variety of product types, such as oil drops, capsules, syrups, teas and topical lotions and creams. Often such products are sold online and are therefore available throughout the country. Other than one prescription human drug product to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy, the FDA has not approved any other CBD products, and there is very limited information for other marketed CBD products, which likely differ in composition from the FDA-approved product and have not been evaluated for potential adverse effects on the body.

Unlike drugs approved by the FDA, the manufacturing process of these products has not been subject to FDA review as part of the drug approval process, and there has been no FDA evaluation of whether these products are effective for their intended use, what the proper dosage is, how they could interact with FDA-approved drugs, or whether they have dangerous side effects or other safety concerns. Unsubstantiated claims associated with CBD products may lead consumers to put off getting important medical care, such as proper diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. For that reason, it’s important that consumers talk to a health care professional about the best way to treat diseases or conditions with existing, approved treatment options. The FDA also cautions pet owners against the use of such products and recommends talking with a veterinarian about appropriate treatment options for pets. The agency also has not approved cannabis or cannabis-derived compounds like CBD for any use in animals and cannot ensure the safety or effectiveness of these products.

The FDA has previously sent warning letters to other companies illegally selling CBD products that claimed to prevent, diagnose, treat, or cure serious diseases, such as cancer. Some of these products were in further violation of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act because they were marketed as dietary supplements or because they involved the addition of CBD to food.

The agency encourages health care professionals and consumers to report adverse reactions associated with these or similar products to the agency’s MedWatch program.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, promotes and protects the public health by, among other things, assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
While this site does have affiliate links to purchase CBD, it also seems to be a good source for info.

CBD AND DRUG INTERACTIONS: AN EASY GUIDE

cbd_and_drugs_interaction_easy_guide

looking for the best cbd manufacturer?
Look no more!
I’ve compiled a list of the best CBD products & manufacturers and they’re even broken down by specific use-cases.
You can read more by clicking here.

**IMPORTANT: CBD AND DRUG INTERACTIONS ARE NOT A JOKE. IF YOU WANT TO START TAKING CBD AND ARE ALREADY TAKING OTHER MEDICATIONS, PLEASE CHECK WITH YOUR DOCTOR FIRST!**

While CBD is safe to use, it can potentially mess with other medications you may be taking.

This quick guide should be all you need to safely use CBD even if you have other medications you need to take.

can cbd interact with other drugs?


Yes.

The way that CBD is metabolized by your body can interfere with how your body normally metabolizes other drugs you take.

If those other drugs arn’t metabolized properly, they can hang around and stay in your system longer than you want.

This can cause negative side effects and complications.

One kind of drug you should pay special attention to is a blood thinner like warfarin.

Taking CBD with warfarin can make the warfarin stay in your system for too long without being broken down.

CBD drug interactions arn’t always bad.

They can actually be a good thing. CBD can make other drugs more effective, so much so that you can reduce the dosage of those other drugs and thus have less negative side effects to deal with.

the grapefruit test is all you need

Thank you to Martin Lee of Project CBD for inspiring the Grapefruit Test.

If you haven’t been to Project CBD yet, make sure to check it out.

They are running a great site with lots of useful information about cannabis medicine.

As Lee explained in his class CBD 101, CBD interacts with other medications in your body in the same way as grapefruit, only even stronger.
grapefruit 154469 640

Have you ever been told not to take your medication with grapefruit?

This is because compounds in grapefruits can interfere with the metabolism of many medications.

CBD does the same thing. But as I said above, the effect is even stronger with CBD.

Do the grapefruit test with your doctor or pharmacist.

Ask them: “Should I avoid eating grapefruits or drinking grapefruit juice with this medication?”

They will know exactly what you are talking about.

If they say yes, you should avoid grapefruits with your medication, you now know you need to be careful about mixing CBD with those same meds as well.

Talk to your doctor about CBD and tell them about it if they say you should avoid grapefruits with your medication.

Alternatively, you can skip the Grapefruit Test and just directly tell your doctor you want to use CBD.

We always recommend you do this anyway, even if your doctor doesn’t work with cannabis.

Medical schools don’t educate physicians about the endocannainoid system, the most widespread receptor system in the human body.

But that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t educate them about it!

If your doctor is aware of your CBD usage, he may decide to monitor your blood work more closely or tell you to avoid taking CBD at the exact same time as your other medications.

Play it safe and keep CBD safe. If you take other drugs, make sure they won’t interact negatively with CBD before you start taking CBD.
 

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