Sponsored by

PuffItUp Dynavap VGoodiez 420EDC Dispensr
  • Enter for a chance to win a custom stand and stem by Aezhennwood in our NEW YEAR GIVEAWAY .
  • Welcome to VaporAsylum! Please take a moment to read our RULES and introduce yourself here.
  • Need help navigating the forum? Find out how to use our features here.
  • Did you know we have lots of smilies for you to use?

Meds Chronic Pain

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
What a long and difficult road to travel. Chronic pain affects mental health big time. The constant nagging pain, loss of sleep, poor nutrition, lack of exercise all add up.
My previous surgeries have made it very hard to work out. I have found walking, watching what I eat, and ingesting hemp and weed to be my best bet at minimizing pain. Cause you know it's always there, it's how you manage it that makes the difference. The fucking meds are what fucks you up even more. Viscous cycle hard to break. JAJAJA But I did it with weed :nod::weed:
I was given so many drug’s from Doctor’s?
CANNABIS has helped to eliminate these drug’s!
Too bad they don’t teach student’s about low cost CANNABIS for many sickness’s? (Med school)
 

merlynschain

New Member
I got on the wrong side of a Cadillac when I was a kid, lost the hip-age 18, on my third artificial hip now at age 63 and can't count the surgeries in between. Picked up a blood born pathogen in transfusions, bags of it - probably starting with the first surgery...Dark Age depression eras and civil war medicine along the way (girdlestone). Periods of pill boxes interspersed with nothing at all... anyway, I basically can only echo what others say in this thread.....pain and brain control is why I'm here. Vaping is one good way to reduce or eliminate powerful and addictive pain control pharmaceuticals, while addressing quality of life issues. So much of this chronic condition business is the head trip, regaining authority and consent over mind and body, reclaiming personal power and learning to fly, learning to fall.

Lot's of serious good work going on here at VA. Thank you. ~ . ~
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
I got on the wrong side of a Cadillac when I was a kid, lost the hip-age 18, on my third artificial hip now at age 63 and can't count the surgeries in between. Picked up a blood born pathogen in transfusions, bags of it - probably starting with the first surgery...Dark Age depression eras and civil war medicine along the way (girdlestone). Periods of pill boxes interspersed with nothing at all... anyway, I basically can only echo what others say in this thread.....pain and brain control is why I'm here. Vaping is one good way to reduce or eliminate powerful and addictive pain control pharmaceuticals, while addressing quality of life issues. So much of this chronic condition business is the head trip, regaining authority and consent over mind and body, reclaiming personal power and learning to fly, learning to fall.

Lot's of serious good work going on here at VA. Thank you. ~ . ~
65 Ford Mustang was my first auto that I side swiped a brand new BRENTWOOD-CAD.
My older friend’s & cousin’s got drafted in a war (southeast Asia known as Vietnam) some chemical (agent orange)
Some came back messed up with all kind’s of medical illness?
Goofing off went dazed & confused was OK (waterless swimming pool’s after school)
420 was celebrated daily however risky.
I’m was a young gun at the time?
62 soon?
Welcome 2 madness!
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
New Study Looks at Cannabis Users’ Pain Tolerance
The study looked at those who use cannabis more than three times a week and compared them with people who were not cannabis users.

A study by University of British Columbia Okanagan campus shows that regular cannabis use, unlike opiate use, does not make pain sensitivity worse, the way opiates do.

Due to the alarming opiate crisis in the country, coupled with an increased interest in medical cannabis, there has been an uptick in research on how cannabis can help with pain. This new study is important because it means that, even if you use cannabis frequently to help with pain, you will not need more and more cannabis or find that you are no longer getting pain relief at all.

“Recent years have seen an increase in the adoption of cannabinoid medicines, which have demonstrated effectiveness for the treatment of chronic pain,” said Michelle St. Pierre, one of the researchers who worked on the study. “However, the extent to which frequent cannabis use influences sensitivity to acute pain has not been systematically examined.”

“This study should come as good news to patients who are already using cannabis to treat pain,” added co-author Zach Walsh, head of the UBC Therapeutic Recreational and Problematic Substance Use Lab, the group that specifically conducted the study. “Increases in pain sensitivity with opioids can really complicate an already tough situation; given increasing uptake of cannabis-based pain medications it’s a relief that we didn’t identify a similar pattern with cannabinoids.”


Pain and Opiates
Opiates are currently the go-to prescribed items for pain, and dependence on opiates is a major issue. Patients often have to up their doses to deal with pain, which makes them even more dangerous.

“There is a different effect from opioid users; sustained use of opioids can make people more reactive to pain. We wanted to determine if there was a similar trend for people who use cannabis frequently,” said St. Pierre. “Cannabis and opioids share some of the same pain-relief pathways and have both been associated with increases in pain sensitivity following acute use.”

The study looked at those who use cannabis more than three times a week and compared them with people who were not cannabis users. Participants had their hands and arms submerged in cold water to determine pain tolerance level. From doing that, they were able to determine that cannabis does not cause hyperalgesia, or enhanced sensitivity to pain.

“Our results suggest frequent cannabis use did not seem to be associated with elevated sensitivity to experimental pain in a manner that can occur in opioid therapy,” St. Pierre concluded. “This is an important distinction that care providers and patients should consider when selecting options for pain management. These findings are particularly relevant in light of recent reports of opioid overprescribing and high rates of pain in the population, as it suggests that cannabis may not carry the same risk of hyperalgesia as opioids.”

This is a hugely important study for the brave new world of cannabis pain research, as it provides even more evidence that cannabis is a safe alternative to dangerous, habit-forming opiates. More research will reveal even more details about how cannabis works with pain management.
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer

CDC Meets With Medical Marijuana Patients To Discuss Cannabis As Alternative Pain Therapy

Published
7 hours ago
on
September 15, 2020
By
Kyle Jaeger

Dustin McDonald, who uses cannabis to treat Lyme disease and also serves as policy director with Americans for Safe Access (ASA), told Marijuana Moment last week that his conversation with the federal agency was productive, with representatives listening attentively as he explained his personal experiences as well as the advocacy work that ASA is involved in.

Beyond simply getting an audience with a main federal health agency, McDonald said what especially stood out to him was that the CDC representatives told him that his wasn’t the first meeting they’ve had with someone who uses medical marijuana as an alternative pain management option. In fact, they said “a lot of the folks that they had spoken with were using cannabis for chronic pain.”

“In addition to my interview and my testimony discussing my experience utilizing medical cannabis for chronic pain and acute pain, there was a large population of people that they spoke with that were doing something similar,” McDonald said, adding that the CDC officials “seemed fairly open-minded” about the subject despite the ongoing federal prohibition of marijuana.
The ASA activist was especially encouraged by the last question the agency put to him, which he said asked “what could CDC do to assist in it advancing the conversation on additional research into medical cannabis applications to human health and health disorders, in talking to the lawmakers about the need to dive more deeply into researching all of these applications.”

ASA wants to take advantage of the opportunity to work with CDC and other related agencies to advocate for “removing roadblocks to research and pushing federal dollars towards combined grant programs for federal government agencies and academic institutions to really take a look at what’s going on with medical cannabis as a medicine,” McDonald said.

While it’s not clear what steps, if any, CDC will take to advance that conversation, McDonald said the fact that the agency heard from a multitude of voices about the therapeutic potential of marijuana could push them to take some action. At the very least, he expects medical marijuana to be discussed at some length in CDC’s forthcoming updated Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chronic Pain.
Marijuana Moment reached out to CDC to find out how often cannabis has been brought up in its meetings with stakeholders, but a representative was not immediately available.

The agency said in a notice about the pain management meetings published in the Federal Register in July that the conversations “will help inform CDC’s understanding of stakeholders’ values and preferences related to pain and pain management and will complement CDC’s ongoing work” on updating that guideline.

This comes months after CDC closed a public comment period on pain management that saw over 1,000 submissions advocating for marijuana and kratom as pain relief options.
 

deep_meditation

Well-Known Member
I always considered myself more of an indica or india dominant hybrid type of guy. I tried some of the sativa dominant Lone Star crumble this morning. I used the Sequoia and took only a couple of puffs. It really helped with my pain and this strain combined with my opiates will help me to keep the opiates at a lower dosage. I would say the difference was dramatic. I need to read more about how the different terps "work". I'm going to ask one of my PA's about it as she went to a cannabis convention for medical professionals.
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
I always considered myself more of an indica or india dominant hybrid type of guy. I tried some of the sativa dominant Lone Star crumble this morning. I used the Sequoia and took only a couple of puffs. It really helped with my pain and this strain combined with my opiates will help me to keep the opiates at a lower dosage. I would say the difference was dramatic. I need to read more about how the different terps "work". I'm going to ask one of my PA's about it as she went to a cannabis convention for medical professionals.
In my experience I found SATIVA in the morning Ideal for me?
HYBRID after 11:00 am
INDICA after 4:20 pm
My friend’s (some) took LSD on Saturday
Some when to UNIVERSITY
Some died?
Moral of the story: What work’s for your situation?
I like CANNABIS as my medicine of choice!
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
I am an Indica kind of a girl but do hybrids as well. It depends on what I like - vapor taste too. Sometimes one place will have Gorilla Glue a Sativa and sometimes it’s a Hybrid. Then I question the budtender and they tell me that the growers offer both. I like both of them usually. I have arthritis all over so cannabis is an important pain reliever.

I prefer really nice buds, not the scubby stuff, so I pay more for quality, don’t want too dry. That’s usually the stuff that’s marked down.
I really like the citrus taste of the vapor and how it works on my pain. So go find some Gorilla Glue and try it out if you have it locally at the store, if it’s in a legal state - a friend of a friend........:twocents:

I’m recovering from Bells Palsey still having a little trouble with the eye, sorry for typos, I’m trying. My face feels bruised on the side by my ear - using some concentrate oil in my ecig vape:weed:
 
Last edited:

LesPlenty

Well-Known Member
I had White Rhino for over 10 years, a very strong indica dominant strain that made me pretty sleepy/couch locked a lot so I changed to Incredible Bulk that has a slightly higher sativa percentage and I still get the pain relief and I remain a bit more alert.
Dabbing over vaping seems to wake me up more...the slap in face occassional big dab might be the reason too...Plenty herb vape just before bed...very heavy bend to the Plenty, just something about vaping over a gram at once maybe.:twocents:
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
Let me ch
I had White Rhino for over 10 years, a very strong indica dominant strain that made me pretty sleepy/couch locked a lot so I changed to Incredible Bulk that has a slightly higher sativa percentage and I still get the pain relief and I remain a bit more alert.
Dabbing over vaping seems to wake me up more...the slap in face occassional big dab might be the reason too...Plenty herb vape just before bed...very heavy bend to the Plenty, just something about vaping over a gram at once maybe.:twocents:
Chime in and tell you in writing a story about CANNABIS?
Back in the 1970’s in HAWAII and long hair was popular (4-men)?
Large plot’s of coastal land with COLAS protruding from the top’s of the super cropped CANNABIS plant’s !
Surfer/grower’s for survival of the fittest crossing MAUI WOWIE with AFAGANI from the Indian Ocean.
Kind of like GRANDADDY PURPLE before the GREEN RUSH.
So strong compared to the mainland MARIJUANA?
Seed’s on plant’s was not available due to pulling up the male plant’s!
From the deck up high around the house on a hill in the wilderness far from CIVILIZATION.
Coughing up a lung or two has the delicious taste made the experience memorable.
CANNABIS is very amazing actually?
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

MARIJUANA MICRODOSING STUDY CONFIRMS PAIN BENEFITS


When it comes to cannabis dosing, more isn’t always better. In fact, the very best dose of cannabis might be the dose you don’t immediately feel at all!
That’s according to a study put out by Syque Medical, a Tel Aviv-based medical cannabis company. Published only recently, in May of 2020, this clinical trial is the first to show that microdoses of cannabis can be just as effective as much higher doses.
Before getting into the study itself, though, let’s go over the basics.

WHAT IS MICRODOSING?​

The concept of microdosing is pretty simple. It just refers to taking small amounts of cannabis, usually frequently throughout the day.
The premise behind marijuana microdosing is equally straightforward. Instead of overwhelming the endocannabinoid system with more cannabinoids than it needs, the thinking goes: Why not provide smaller doses designed to kickstart the body’s own endocannabinoid production? Endocannabinoids like anandamide, after all, are what really keep pain and inflammation at bay.
But that’s all theoretical.
Up until recently, scientists didn’t know whether microdosing worked or not…

MICRODOSING STUDY: IMPORTANT FINDINGS​

In light of this lack of research, Syqe Medical’s scientists set out to learn more. They gave 27 patients with chronic pain (reporting pain levels of at least six out of 10) one of the following treatment options:
  • .5mg of inhaled THC
  • 1mg of inhaled THC
  • Placebo containing no THC at all
Patients didn’t know what dosage they were getting.
When the study was complete, the 1mg THC group’s plasma THC levels peaked at over twice the .5mg group’s, implying that higher THC intake may facilitate slightly higher THC absorption. But interestingly, while the 1mg THC group also experienced side effects more than twice as intense, they didn’t experience twice the pain relief — the two groups reported 39% and 25% reductions, respectively.
Both doses resulted in a notable reduction in pain intensity: 63.64% of the patients in 0.5 mg dose, and more than 69.57% of the patients in 1.0 mg dose, demonstrated at least 2‐points reduction in pain scores.
Translation? Higher THC doses aren’t always necessary to alleviate pain.

MICRODOSING WITH THC​

According to those close to the study, these findings indicate that it really is possible to get the best of both worlds. As Syqe Medical’s CEO, Perry Davidson, explains to The Times of Israel:
It’s about using the smallest amount of the drug to get the highest symptom relief, lowest side-effects and best quality of life.
And getting the best of both worlds also means avoiding unwanted side effects. According to Davidson:
Cannabis use usually comes with side effects. [We’ve] found that a microdose can give significant pain relief, similar to the pain relief from smoking cannabis, but has close to no side effects which makes it a better way of dosing.
Microdosing THC also allows one to avoid the infamous THC-induced high — at least in part. Indeed, most patients given .5mg of THC felt almost nothing (save for some pain relief, of course!).

MICRODOSING WITH CBD​

More good news: The benefits of microdosing don’t stop with THC!
CBD microdosing may allow for reduced pain and inflammation in the absence of side effects, too. Patients also report that CBD microdosing may combat anxiety and depression.
Here’s to hoping that studies begin to uncover more CBD-specific benefits soon!

 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Cannabis And Pain Management: Is Alternative Plant Medicine Becoming The New Norm?


As time goes on, alternative plant medicine, such as cannabis, are slowly changing the way pain management is viewed and executed.​

Did you know that in 2019, chronic pain impacted one-third of the U.S. population? This number continues to rise, and so does the consumption of various substances to help manage and/or combat pain.

Currently, different NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), acetaminophen, and opioids are used the most often for the treatment of pain. However, there’s no guarantee that these drugs will be fully effective in eliminating pain nor is there a guarantee that these drugs won’t cause any adverse side effects.

Nowadays, cannabis and its many cannabinoids are being pursued more because of their medicinal and therapeutic properties.Overall, though, alternative plant medicine is becoming a part of thousands of people’s routines and lifestyles for numerous reasons. Here are a few main reasons why.

Understanding Types of Pain and How to Treat It Properly

Oftentimes, when someone experiences pain, their primary mission is to eliminate it and use or consume a product to achieve relief. Before treating pain though, it’s important to understand the characteristics of the pain itself, the severity of it, and the nature of it. For example, is the pain acute or chronic? Is it neuropathic or inflammatory pain? Is the pain caused by an injury, illness, ailment, or a new medication? After understanding the type of pain, finding an appropriate treatment method is the next step.

When evaluating numerous treatment methods, it’s essential to understand the efficacies of different treatment options and potential adverse effects/reactions. From here, an individual should be able to find a suitable treatment method that aligns with the type of pain they’re experiencing.

Traditional Medicines Versus Alternative Plant Medicines

Although opioids, NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and various OTC (over-the-counter) drugs tend to be the norm for pain management and/or relief, cannabis and its array of beneficial cannabinoids are growing in demand and usage.


Specifically, to avoid potential adverse side effects and/or the risk of drug addiction or dependency, for many, opioids are taking a back seat, and cannabinoids are being pursued instead. Despite traditional medicines demonstrating their efficacy in many different situations and among different people, issues can still arise post-consumption.

For example, NSAIDs can be beneficial, but they’ve also been associated with severe complications involving the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal systems. Next are opioids, which have proven their effectiveness in different situations, but they’ve also demonstrated their ability to cause cognitive deficiencies, motor impairment, and respiratory depression. Opioids also unfortunately represent a substantial addiction and dependency risk among specific groups of individuals.

As time goes on, alternative plant medicine, such as cannabis, numerous cannabinoids, and terpenes, are slowly changing the way pain management is viewed and/or executed.

Cannabis For Pain Management & Treatment

The cannabis plant contains over 100 cannabinoids, but some of them are more well-known such as Cannabidiol (CBD) and Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Numerous cannabinoids are medically and therapeutically beneficial in multiple ways, but CBD, THC, Cannabichromene (CBC), and Cannabigerol’s (CBG) analgesic properties stand out. So far, it has been found that CBC contains both anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Whereas, CBG has proven its stronger analgesic activity than THC.

Aside from different cannabinoids’ analgesic properties, various terpenes found on the cannabis plant are analgesics as well, especially myrcene. One 2008 study expanded on this and stated that: “Myrcene is analgesic, and such activity, in contrast to cannabinoids, is blocked by naloxone suggesting an opioid-like mechanism.” Another terpene that contains analgesic and anti-inflammatory attributes is β-caryophyllene.

In addition, cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well-tolerated within clinical trials. The World Health Organization (WHO) also reported that CBD is non-psychoactive, non-toxic, non-addictive, and has a good safety profile.

Although there’s more to learn about cannabinoids and pain management, various surveys of cannabis users have shed light on the substitution of cannabis products for opioids. Specifically, one 2017 survey focused on American and Canadian cannabis users, and the following was reported: “Our findings are consistent with prior surveys of American and Canadian marijuana users in which substitution of marijuana for opioids was prevalent due to better symptom management and fewer adverse and withdrawal effects.”
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!

Cannabis And Pain Management: Is Alternative Plant Medicine Becoming The New Norm?


As time goes on, alternative plant medicine, such as cannabis, are slowly changing the way pain management is viewed and executed.​

Did you know that in 2019, chronic pain impacted one-third of the U.S. population? This number continues to rise, and so does the consumption of various substances to help manage and/or combat pain.

Currently, different NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), acetaminophen, and opioids are used the most often for the treatment of pain. However, there’s no guarantee that these drugs will be fully effective in eliminating pain nor is there a guarantee that these drugs won’t cause any adverse side effects.

Nowadays, cannabis and its many cannabinoids are being pursued more because of their medicinal and therapeutic properties.Overall, though, alternative plant medicine is becoming a part of thousands of people’s routines and lifestyles for numerous reasons. Here are a few main reasons why.

Understanding Types of Pain and How to Treat It Properly

Oftentimes, when someone experiences pain, their primary mission is to eliminate it and use or consume a product to achieve relief. Before treating pain though, it’s important to understand the characteristics of the pain itself, the severity of it, and the nature of it. For example, is the pain acute or chronic? Is it neuropathic or inflammatory pain? Is the pain caused by an injury, illness, ailment, or a new medication? After understanding the type of pain, finding an appropriate treatment method is the next step.

When evaluating numerous treatment methods, it’s essential to understand the efficacies of different treatment options and potential adverse effects/reactions. From here, an individual should be able to find a suitable treatment method that aligns with the type of pain they’re experiencing.

Traditional Medicines Versus Alternative Plant Medicines

Although opioids, NSAIDs, acetaminophen, and various OTC (over-the-counter) drugs tend to be the norm for pain management and/or relief, cannabis and its array of beneficial cannabinoids are growing in demand and usage.


Specifically, to avoid potential adverse side effects and/or the risk of drug addiction or dependency, for many, opioids are taking a back seat, and cannabinoids are being pursued instead. Despite traditional medicines demonstrating their efficacy in many different situations and among different people, issues can still arise post-consumption.

For example, NSAIDs can be beneficial, but they’ve also been associated with severe complications involving the gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and renal systems. Next are opioids, which have proven their effectiveness in different situations, but they’ve also demonstrated their ability to cause cognitive deficiencies, motor impairment, and respiratory depression. Opioids also unfortunately represent a substantial addiction and dependency risk among specific groups of individuals.

As time goes on, alternative plant medicine, such as cannabis, numerous cannabinoids, and terpenes, are slowly changing the way pain management is viewed and/or executed.

Cannabis For Pain Management & Treatment

The cannabis plant contains over 100 cannabinoids, but some of them are more well-known such as Cannabidiol (CBD) and Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Numerous cannabinoids are medically and therapeutically beneficial in multiple ways, but CBD, THC, Cannabichromene (CBC), and Cannabigerol’s (CBG) analgesic properties stand out. So far, it has been found that CBC contains both anti-inflammatory and analgesic properties. Whereas, CBG has proven its stronger analgesic activity than THC.

Aside from different cannabinoids’ analgesic properties, various terpenes found on the cannabis plant are analgesics as well, especially myrcene. One 2008 study expanded on this and stated that: “Myrcene is analgesic, and such activity, in contrast to cannabinoids, is blocked by naloxone suggesting an opioid-like mechanism.” Another terpene that contains analgesic and anti-inflammatory attributes is β-caryophyllene.

In addition, cannabinoid analgesics have generally been well-tolerated within clinical trials. The World Health Organization (WHO) also reported that CBD is non-psychoactive, non-toxic, non-addictive, and has a good safety profile.

Although there’s more to learn about cannabinoids and pain management, various surveys of cannabis users have shed light on the substitution of cannabis products for opioids. Specifically, one 2017 survey focused on American and Canadian cannabis users, and the following was reported: “Our findings are consistent with prior surveys of American and Canadian marijuana users in which substitution of marijuana for opioids was prevalent due to better symptom management and fewer adverse and withdrawal effects.”
Main stream Society is controlling the narrative?
 

Sponsored by

PuffItUp Dynavap VGoodiez 420EDC Dispensr
Top