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momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Anita Lane Dies, Aged 62


The Australian artist collaborated with the likes of Nick Cave, Einstürzende Neubauten and lots more across her career


anita_lane_1619605551_crop_550x593.png
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Paying Our Respects to Revolutionary Educator and Hashmaker: Frenchy Cannoli Passes Away

Renowned hashmaker, educator and activist Frenchy Cannoli has suddenly passed away, leaving behind decades worth of revolutionary techniques in hashmaking.

According to a heartfelt post on Instagram by his wife Kimberly, the beloved hashish and cannabis concentrate teacher, consultant, artisan and activist Frenchy Cannoli passed away on July 18. Cannoli passed away due to surgery complications—which was unexpected, according to his family.

Cannoli was known for his “unmatched” hash, and most people who were close to him described his character as being utterly unique. He was more or less the authority on the history of cannabis concentrates—and highly respected for that very specific skill set.

“It’s with profound, heartbreaking grief that I share with you due to complications from surgery Frenchy left us on Sunday,” Kimberly posted. “⁠I’m sorry I couldn’t share this with you in person. This seemed like the best way to let you know directly from me.”

Cannoli never failed to share his secrets with generations of would-be hashishins.
Frenchy4.jpeg


Kimberly reflected on the time her late husband spent in Nice, France and surrounding areas, but also his travels to the East where he learned the secrets to incredible hash. Kimberly’s post included a photo of Frenchy from 1980, taken in India.

“Frenchy often shared there were three main periods in his life—first, the 18-year timeframe from when he left home in Southern France to travel, wandering the world, enamored of new cultures [and] experiences, then the period of fatherhood from his mid-30s to early 50s, and then finally the period of becoming the teacher that followed when he came to the states in the 2000s,” she continued. “I cannot begin to express how much meaning and joy his interactions with all of you brought him. He truly cherished this unexpected evolution of the latter part of his life.⁠”
Cannoli’s family was apparently not ready for the tragic news, which left them jarred and at loss for words.

“His passing was unexpected and leaves his family with a gaping hole of emotion where his smile and energy usually filled us so completely,” she wrote. “I think what we all appreciated about Frenchy so much was his authenticity and passion. It would give me great solace to see his face lit up with a smile right now.”

Frenchy Cannoli, the Man​

Cannoli grew up in Nice, France and was naturally attracted to the imported hashish common in the area during the late ’60s. He was born on December 13, 1956. He lived as a nomad for over 20 years—often staying with traditional hashish producers and learning techniques handed down over generations.

His travels took him from Morocco to Mexico, where he eventually made his way to Nepal, Pakistan and finally India, where he spent eight growing seasons living in caves and harvesting cannabis resin with Parvati Valley cultivators.

But eventually, Cannoli slowed down and settled with his family in California, where medical cannabis was coming into focus and where he could make concentrates—legally.

Cannoli’s “Lost Art of the Hashishin” seminars provided hands-on training for aspiring hash-makers and the artist posted his same techniques on YouTube—eventually gaining 174,000+ Instagram followers.

Cannoli continued to promote post-legalization public education—developing hashish grading standards, and supporting regional growing certifications for cannabis production, inspired by “appellation d’origine contrôlée” rules, which according to his website, protect the integrity of Bordeaux wines.

Cannoli also developed a docu-series, Frenchy Dreams of Hashish, with documentary filmmaker Jake Remington of Collabo NYC that showcases the challenges legalization has brought to small California farms. Frenchy Dreams of Hashish is a seven-part docu-series filmed over the course of three years during the transition from Proposition 215 to Proposition 64.

Follow Madame Cannoli, or Kimberly, Frenchy’s wife on her Instagram page and offer your condolences.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member

Paying Our Respects to Revolutionary Educator and Hashmaker: Frenchy Cannoli Passes Away

Renowned hashmaker, educator and activist Frenchy Cannoli has suddenly passed away, leaving behind decades worth of revolutionary techniques in hashmaking.

According to a heartfelt post on Instagram by his wife Kimberly, the beloved hashish and cannabis concentrate teacher, consultant, artisan and activist Frenchy Cannoli passed away on July 18. Cannoli passed away due to surgery complications—which was unexpected, according to his family.

Cannoli was known for his “unmatched” hash, and most people who were close to him described his character as being utterly unique. He was more or less the authority on the history of cannabis concentrates—and highly respected for that very specific skill set.

“It’s with profound, heartbreaking grief that I share with you due to complications from surgery Frenchy left us on Sunday,” Kimberly posted. “⁠I’m sorry I couldn’t share this with you in person. This seemed like the best way to let you know directly from me.”

Cannoli never failed to share his secrets with generations of would-be hashishins.
View attachment 28916

Kimberly reflected on the time her late husband spent in Nice, France and surrounding areas, but also his travels to the East where he learned the secrets to incredible hash. Kimberly’s post included a photo of Frenchy from 1980, taken in India.

“Frenchy often shared there were three main periods in his life—first, the 18-year timeframe from when he left home in Southern France to travel, wandering the world, enamored of new cultures [and] experiences, then the period of fatherhood from his mid-30s to early 50s, and then finally the period of becoming the teacher that followed when he came to the states in the 2000s,” she continued. “I cannot begin to express how much meaning and joy his interactions with all of you brought him. He truly cherished this unexpected evolution of the latter part of his life.⁠”
Cannoli’s family was apparently not ready for the tragic news, which left them jarred and at loss for words.

“His passing was unexpected and leaves his family with a gaping hole of emotion where his smile and energy usually filled us so completely,” she wrote. “I think what we all appreciated about Frenchy so much was his authenticity and passion. It would give me great solace to see his face lit up with a smile right now.”

Frenchy Cannoli, the Man​

Cannoli grew up in Nice, France and was naturally attracted to the imported hashish common in the area during the late ’60s. He was born on December 13, 1956. He lived as a nomad for over 20 years—often staying with traditional hashish producers and learning techniques handed down over generations.

His travels took him from Morocco to Mexico, where he eventually made his way to Nepal, Pakistan and finally India, where he spent eight growing seasons living in caves and harvesting cannabis resin with Parvati Valley cultivators.

But eventually, Cannoli slowed down and settled with his family in California, where medical cannabis was coming into focus and where he could make concentrates—legally.

Cannoli’s “Lost Art of the Hashishin” seminars provided hands-on training for aspiring hash-makers and the artist posted his same techniques on YouTube—eventually gaining 174,000+ Instagram followers.

Cannoli continued to promote post-legalization public education—developing hashish grading standards, and supporting regional growing certifications for cannabis production, inspired by “appellation d’origine contrôlée” rules, which according to his website, protect the integrity of Bordeaux wines.

Cannoli also developed a docu-series, Frenchy Dreams of Hashish, with documentary filmmaker Jake Remington of Collabo NYC that showcases the challenges legalization has brought to small California farms. Frenchy Dreams of Hashish is a seven-part docu-series filmed over the course of three years during the transition from Proposition 215 to Proposition 64.

Follow Madame Cannoli, or Kimberly, Frenchy’s wife on her Instagram page and offer your condolences.
Aw, that's sad. He was younger than I by a few years...what, 65 maybe?

I watched his YT vids on making hash...he had a series where he went thru the entire process of making temple ball type hash. He was very interesting, very entertaining, and he made very mouthwatering hashish.

This is a shame. I was hoping to get to somewhere/someday where they sold his hash and try some. Not to be now.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Founding Slipknot member and acclaimed drummer Joey Jordison dead at age 46


Joey Jordison, best known as the former drummer, co-songwriter, and co-founder of influential alternative metal band Slipknot as well as the guitarist for horror-punk group Murderdolls, has died, according to a statement released Tuesday afternoon by his family.

“We are heartbroken to share the news that Joey Jordison, prolific drummer, musician and artist, passed away peacefully in his sleep on July 26th, 2021. He was 46,” the statement read. “Joey’s death has left us with empty hearts and feelings of indescribable sorrow. To those that knew Joey, understood his quick wit, his gentle personality, giant heart and his love for all things family and music. The family of Joey have asked that friends, fans and media understandably respect our need for privacy and peace at this incredibly difficult time. The family will hold a private funeral service and asks the media and public to respect their wishes.” No cause of death was given.

Nathan Jonas “Joey” Jordison was born April 26, 1975 in Des Moines, Iowa, and he began playing drums at age 8, even forming his first band when he was still in elementary school. In 1995, Jordison joined a local metal band called the Pale Ones, who were later renamed Slipknot upon Jordison's suggestion. After creating their own scene in Iowa, attracting a devoted following of fans they affectionately dubbed “Maggots,” and self-releasing the demo album Mate. Feed. Kill. Repeat. on Halloween 1996, Slipknot signed to Roadrunner Records and broke through to the mainstream. Their self-titled Roadrunner debut was in fact the first album in that label’s history to be certified platinum.

With their unique and visceral blend of shock-rock, hip-hop, lyrical nihilism, and theatrical presentation (the nine-member band famously performed in matching industrial boilers suits and creepy 3D Halloween masks), Slipknot became one of the most successful, pioneering, and enduring bands of late-’90s/early-2000s nu-metal explosion. They eventually sold 30 million albums worldwide and earned 10 Grammy nominations, with their Rick Rubin-produced track "Before I Forget" winning the Grammy Award for Best Metal Performance in 2006.

Jordison played on Slipknot’s first four studio albums — 1999’s Slipknot, 2001’s Iowa, 2004’s Vol. 3: (The Subliminal Verses), and 2008’s All Hope Is Gone — after which the band would not release a new album until 2014’s .5: The Gray Chapter. It was during the making of that record that Jordison left the group. At that time, in 2013, Slipknot cited mysterious personal reasons for his departure, and Jordison countered with a statement claiming that he had been fired, insisting, “[Slipknot] has been my life for the last 18 years, and I would never abandon it, or my fans.” Also in 2013, Jordison’s side-project Murderdolls officially disbanded.

However, in 2016 Jordison revealed that after experiencing mysterious symptoms since 2010, he had finally been diagnosed with transverse myelitis, a neurological disease that had temporarily rendered him unable to use his left leg or play drums during the end of his run with Slipknot. It is currently unclear if this condition was connected to Jordison’s death in any way, but in a 2018 interview with Rhythm magazine, he stated that he had fully recovered with the help of intensive rehabilitation.

Along with his work in Slipknot and Murderdolls, Jordison — whose influences included Led Zeppelin’s John Bonham, the Who’s Keith Moon, KISS’s Peter Criss, Mötley Crüe’s Tommy Lee, Gene Krupa, and Buddy Rich — played in Scar the Martyr, Vimic, and Sinsaenum. He also collaborated with Rob Zombie, Metallica, Marilyn Manson, Korn, Ministry, Otep, and Satyricon. During his career, Jordison received many accolades for his drumming, including a Golden God trophy at the Metal Hammer Golden Gods Awards, a Drummies Award for Best Metal Drummer, and the title of No. 1 heavy metal drummer according Loudwire readers.

In 2010, a Rhythm magazine readers' poll even named Jordison the best drummer of the previous 25 years, ranking him above the likes of Dave Grohl and Rush’s Neil Peart. He reacted to that honor by stating, “I'm at a loss for words. This is beyond unbelievable. Something like this reminds me every day why I continue to do this.”
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
But wait, there's MORE!!!

Ah, Ron was one of a kind.

"Products sold by his company RONCO include Popeil’s Pocket Fisherman, Mr. Microphone, Hair in a Can, Inside the eggshell egg scrambler and more."​

How could they leave out the Veg-a-matic!! It slices, it dices, it julienne's potatoes!! LOL

Ron Popeil, infomercial icon, dead at 86

The inventor coined the phrase, 'Set it and forget it'​


Ron Popeil, known for appearing in famous infomercials, has died at the age of 86.

The television personality and inventor passed away on Wednesday morning at Los Angeles' Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, according to a press release from his rep obtained by Fox News.

Popeil was known best for the catchphrase "set it and forget it," which he used to sell the Showtime Rotisserie. The product reportedly grossed over $1 billion, blowing past other sales records, including those from QVC.


The inventor got his start in a humble background of selling kitchen products in Chicago before his sales pitches "quickly became must-see live entertainment" that gathered audiences in the "hundreds" who would "marvel at his sales shows in the marquis booth at Woolworth’s flagship store."

DUSTY HILL, ZZ TOP BASSIST, DEAD AT 72

In 1959, Popeil transitioned to television and made his first infomercial for the Chop-o-Matic.

Ron Popeil, known for appearing in famous infomercials, has died at the age of 86.


Ron Popeil, known for appearing in famous infomercials, has died at the age of 86. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
After becoming a mainstay on late-night television, Popeil's star began to rise and he appeared in a number of television shows, often playing himself in small cameo roles.

He also appeared on talk shows like "The Martin Short Show" and "Late Night with Conan O'Brien." Popeil also served as a judge on 2001's "Iron Chef USA: Showdown in Las Vegas."

RICK AIELLO OF ‘DO THE RIGHT THING,’ DANNY AIELLO'S SON DEAD AT 63

"Saturday Night Live" star Dan Aykroyd also played Popeil in a 1976 episode of the popular sketch comedy series.


According to the release, Popeil "garnered more viewers and more hours of American Television than any other celebrity or TV personality."


Outside of "set it and forget it," he was also known for frequently using such catchphrases as "but wait, there's more" and "less shipping and handling." His innovations have been archived by The Smithsonian Institute.

Products sold by his company RONCO include Popeil’s Pocket Fisherman, Mr. Microphone, Hair in a Can, Inside the eggshell egg scrambler and more.

SLIPKNOT'S FORMER DRUMMER JOEY JORDISON DEAD AT 46

"A perfectionist and tinkerer to his core, Ron had the uncanny ability to identify a need that the consumer didn’t realize existed only to then engineer a product that delivered its promise flawlessly to millions of customers," said the release. "… Unabashedly authentic and approachable, Ron used his products as a tool in filling a gap he saw created by the circumstances he faced as a child. Without a traditional family structure, his products and life focused on the kitchen which he saw as the nucleus of a home and family."


Popeil's goals were to make opportunities for families to gather "accessible" and "to bring people together for common purpose and joy — no matter their background or experience."



As if his accomplishments in sales and invention weren't enough, Popeil also worked as a Director of MGM Resorts International for over 30 years and helped to develop Las Vegas' entertainment brand.

Outside of work, he enjoyed fishing, skiing, sailing and more.

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He is survived by his wife Robin, daughters Kathryn, Lauren, Contessa, and Valentina as well as his grandchildren Rachel, Isabella, Nicole, and Asher. He also had a daughter named Shannon who is now deceased.
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member

Nanci Griffith, Grammy-winning folk singer-songwriter, dead at 68​

The 'Love at the Five and Dime' singer's cause of death was not provided​

Associated Press

Fox News Flash top entertainment headlines for August 13 Video

Fox News Flash top entertainment headlines for August 13

Fox News Flash top entertainment and celebrity headlines are here. Check out what's clicking today in entertainment.
Nanci Griffith, the Grammy-winning folk singer-songwriter from Texas whose literary songs like "Love at the Five and Dime" celebrated the South, has died. She was 68.
A statement from her management company on Friday confirmed her death, but no cause was provided.
"It was Nanci’s wish that no further formal statement or press release happen for a week following her passing," Gold Mountain Entertainment said in a statement.


Nanci Griffith, the Grammy-winning folk singer-songwriter from Texas whose literary songs like 'Love at the Five and Dime' celebrated the South, has died. (AP Photo/Julie Jacobson, File)
Griffith worked closely with other folk singers, helping the early careers of artists like Lyle Lovett and Emmylou Harris.
She won the 1994 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Folk Album for "Other Voices, Other Rooms."
Griffith was also known for her recording of "From a Distance," which would later become a well-known Bette Midler tune.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Pot POW Eddy Lepp Passes from Cancer at 69


EddyLepp.jpg


Like many Americans, Charles Eddy Lepp, who passed away from cancer this morning in California at age 69, did serious jail time for cannabis.

On August 18, 2004, DEA agents raided Eddy’s Medicinal Gardens and Multi-Denominational Chapel of Cannabis and Rastafari in Upper Lake, California. Lepp had been allowing patients to cultivate cannabis for medical purposes on his property; many of the 24,784 plants confiscated on the 20 acres were clearly visible from State Highway 20. Lepp was convicted of federal drug felonies in 2007 and sentenced in 2009 to a 10-year mandatory-minimum. He was released in 2016.

Lepp was raided, arrested, charged and acquitted by local and state authorities for doing the same thing in 1997.

"I hope to go back to doing what I’ve been doing for 20 years mostly, which is being an advocate for the full legalization of hemp as an industrial product," Lepp told Freedom Leaf after his release. "Jack Herer and I seldom talked about the uses of cannabis - what we talked about mostly was industrial hemp and why it wasn’t being used for the purposes that God intended it.

"Today, the most-used commodity in products is sea kelp. It’s used in 1,200 to 1,500 products, everything from shoe polish to toothpaste. It’s been estimated that if they had the same freedom to experiment with hemp like they do with sea kelp, that hemp would be in 5,000 to 10,000 products within two years, and in over 25,000 within five. Hemp is truly God’s gift to his children, not just for spiritual use and medicinal use, but as an industrial product, second to none. Marijuana should be treated the same as any other agricultural product."

According to Freedom Leaf, Lepp was "born on May 14, 1952 in La Harpe, Illinois and raised in Reno, Nevada. He served in the U.S. Army’s military intelligence unit in Vietnam from 1969–1972, where he discovered cannabis.

"Lepp’s medical-marijuana epiphany came in 1987 when his father used it to battle cancer. Lepp rose in prominence as a cannabis activist in the early '90s. He and his late wife, Linda Senti, gathered signatures for California’s Proposition 215, and soon after its passage in 1996, Lepp formed the Medicinal Gardens that earned him his first arrest.

Eddy Lepp: "Hemp is truly God’s gift to his children. Marijuana should be treated the same as any other agricultural product."
"During his time in prison, Senti passed away and eight states, including California, legalized the adult use of cannabis. On Dec. 9, 2017, Lepp was released from prison into a halfway house in San Francisco, where he began the probationary portion of his sentence."

Unfortunately, Lepp was unable to resume his life as a cannabis grower. After his release, he married Heidi Grossman, Together, they founded the Sugarleaf Rastafarian Church of Cannabis Love. The marriage and the church didn't last long. The couple divorced, the church disbanded and then Lepp married Sandra Castaneda. Lepp developed a form of cancer over the last few years and lived longer than was expected. Tributes are being made at his OG Eddy Lepp Facebook page.

Lepp was among the last of the activists who paid the price with jail time during cannabis prohibtion. Industry newbies may not know the tales of Eddy Lepp and others who preceded them when the government was quick to lock people up for pot and throw away the key.

Other notable canna-personalities who've passed away in 2021 include Wayward Bill Chengelis, Steve Fox and Frenchy Cannoli.
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
Loved this guy... such a shame.. too young...

Snapchat-1422399642.jpg
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member

Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts dies aged 80​

Musician’s publicist says he died peacefully in a London hospital surrounded by his family
Charlie Watts pictured in 2018

Charlie Watts pictured in 2018. Photograph: Jane Barlow/PA

Press Association
Tue 24 Aug 2021 12.41 EDT


The Rolling Stones drummer Charlie Watts has died, his publicist has said.
The musician, who marked his 80th birthday in June, had been a member of the rock group since 1963.

A statement from his London publicist, Bernard Doherty, to the PA news agency said: “It is with immense sadness that we announce the death of our beloved Charlie Watts.
“He passed away peacefully in a London hospital earlier today surrounded by his family.”
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member
4th September

Obituary: Lee 'Scratch' Perry, whose dense stew of sound changed music forever​

4624052

By Neil CooperTheatre critic
Lee 'Scratch' Perry at the Womad Festival, Wiltshire, in July 2013  (Photo: Tim Goode/PA Wire)

Lee 'Scratch' Perry at the Womad Festival, Wiltshire, in July 2013 (Photo: Tim Goode/PA Wire)

1 comment


Born: March 20/28, 1936;
Died: August 29, 2021.
LEE ‘Scratch’ Perry, who has died aged 85, was a musical pioneer whose free-spirited use of the recording studio as an instrument created some of the most innovative music of the late 20th and early 21st centuries.
Using his first-hand experience of Jamaican sound systems, his innovations saw some of the earliest uses of sampling, when the sound of a crying baby was used on his song, People Funny Boy (1968).
Perry moved Jamaican music forward, beyond ska towards reggae, and then to dub. The latter subverted existing recordings through use of echo, reverb and other electronic effects to create radically reinvented new versions of the material.
Perry’s sonic collages were chopped out on primitive four-track equipment in his back-yard studio, creating a dense stew of sound that changed music forever.
While much has been made of Perry’s eccentric appearance and dervish-like persona, the truth is probably more complex. Copious marijuana use undoubtedly affected how he operated in such a maverick and liberated fashion, but his at times unhinged genius also reflected the chaos of his volatile homeland.

The result was a sonic revolution. Perry’s cut-up creations were made to be played loud in big rooms, where the physical force of his bass-blasting deconstructions could be heard to full discombobulating effect.
His extensive back catalogue pointed the way for remixing, hip-hop, techno and club culture as we now know it. His influence on music remains seismic.
Along the way, he set Bob Marley and the Wailers on the road to global success, and produced The Clash, the London rock group, before latterly working with some of those who picked up his mercurial baton. Collaborators included The Beastie Boys, Adrian Sherwood, The Mad Professor, and The Orb.
Today, Perry’s influence is embedded into popular culture, and his records sound both timeless and other worldly.
Rainford Hugh Perry was born in Kendal, Jamaica (different dates have been given for his birth), the third of four children to Ina Davis and Henry Perry, who earned an at times precarious living as a sugar-cane labourer. As a teen, Perry was attracted to the local dance halls, and was dubbed ‘Neat Little Man’ for his championship moves.

His mystical inclinations were inherent from early on, when he moved to Kingston after claiming to have experienced a spiritual connection to stones while working on a building site.
In the late 1950s, he began working at Clement Coxsone Dodd’s sound system and Studio One recording studio, where his single, Chicken Scratch, (1965), gave him his nickname.
Following a fall-out over money, Perry moved to Joe Gibbs’s Amalgamated Records, where he cut I Am the Upsetter. A dispute with Gibbs saw Perry found his own Upsetter Records, and release People Funny Boy, a barb aimed at Gibbs.
In the early 1970s, Perry built Black Ark, his home-based studio where he worked round the clock with such Jamaican artists as Max Romeo and The Congos,
With his house band, The Upsetters, Perry made some of his defining work at the studio, including 14 Dub Blackboard Jungle (1973), Revolution Dub (1975), and Super Ape (1976). He also produced Junior Murvin’s Police and Thieves (1976), and The Heart of the Congos (1977). By this time, Perry had produced two albums by Bob Marley and the Wailers, Soul Rebel (1970), and Soul Revolution (1971), which took reggae beyond Jamaica.
As Perry’s innovations trickled outwards, Black Ark became a magnet for the likes of such noted British musicians as Robert Palmer, John Martyn and Paul McCartney.
In the UK, The Clash covered Police and Thieves (1977), before Perry went on to oversee the first-generation rebel punk band’s single, Complete Control (1977). Reunited with Marley, Perry captured the spirit of the times with his production of Marley’s Punky Reggae Party (1977) single.
Black Ark was eventually destroyed by fire, taking away its much-used analogue equipment that was housed inside graffiti-overed walls. Perry said he started the blaze himself, purging the demons he claimed to have infested it in a seemingly self-destructive act that nevertheless freed him to move on.
He ended up in London, where a new generation of post-punk and reggae musicians had fallen under his spell.
He worked with Adrian Sherwood and Dub Syndicate on Time Boom x De Devil Dead (1987), and recorded Mystic Warrior (1989) with Neil Fraser, aka Mad Professor. In 1998, he provided vocals for the Beastie Boys’ track, Dr Lee, PhD. Numerous solo albums followed, and in 2003, he won a Grammy for best reggae album with Jamaican E.T.
The same year, he curated the Meltdown festival at the Royal Festival Hall in London, overseeing a programme of fellow travellers that included Michael Franti and Spearhead, DJ Spooky and Sun Ra’s Arkestra. In 2012, he worked with The Orb on their album, The Observer in the Star House.
Having moved to Zurich with his wife Mireille, Perry continued to tour, usually wearing a mirror-bedecked outfit, with his hair and beard coloured red. In 2015, in a fateful echo of Black Ark, his Swiss-based studio, the Secret Laboratory, was destroyed in a fire.
Perry continued to release music at a prolific rate, with a posthumous album, Butterfly Sky, being completed by producer and bassist Martin Glover, aka Youth.
He is survived by his wife Mireille and their two children, Gabriel and Shiva, and four other children, Cleopatra, Marsha, Omar and Marvin (Sean).
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Omar has O.D'd. Fucking shame.....just a fucking wasteful shame.


1631024261043.png


'The Wire' actor Michael K. Williams found dead in Brooklyn apartment, police say



Actor Michael K. Williams, who played the beloved character Omar Little on "The Wire," has died at 54.

BROOKLYN (WABC) -- An actor best known for his work on "The Wire" was found dead in his penthouse apartment in Brooklyn on Monday.

Police say the 54-year-old Michael K. Williams, who played the character Omar Little, was discovered by a family member.
Recent Stories from ABC 7 NY


Drug paraphernalia was found at the scene, authorities say. The NYPD says his death was being investigated as a possible drug overdose, but the medical examiner will determine the official cause.

His death came as a shock to fans, co-stars and especially his close family.

"He was loved," nephew Arvance Williams said. "Always smiling, always happy, always dancing."
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Williams was open about his battle with drug addiction and called it an everyday struggle.

"A lot of people think that when a person puts down the drugs or the alcohol that all the problems go away," he once said. "That couldn't be further from the truth. Drugs and alcohol are not the problem. They are merely symptoms of the problem."

His family was shocked and devastated.

"Mike was the kind of person, he would fall and get back up, he was always trying to do better," Arvance Williams said.

Another nephew, Booker T. Williams, said his uncle "did everything in his power to show love."

"My family loves him," he said. "He loved our family, our community."

Williams appeared in all five seasons of "The Wire" from 2002 to 2008, his character growing in prominence with each season.

As Little, he played a criminal with a strict moral code, known for taking advantage of a reputation for brutality that wasn't always real. The character also broke TV ground as an openly gay man whose sexuality wasn't central to his role.

Reaction started pouring in across social media as news of Williams' death spread.

Williams was raised in East Flatbush at the Vanderveer Estates housing project, now known as Flatbush Gardens. He was the co-founder and an advocate of "We Build the Block."

"He loved the community, he loved Brooklyn, he loved New York," Arvance Williams said.

"Michael K. Williams tried to fix an often broken world," Mayor Bill de Blasio said. "He was generous, kind and stood with those fighting for justice. His work, particularly his role in 'The Wire,' was unforgettable and in its own way, life-affirming. We're keeping all who loved him in our hearts tonight."

Williams was also a ubiquitous character actor in other shows and films for more than two decades, including roles on the HBO series "Boardwalk Empire" and "Lovecraft Country," and in the films "12 Years a Slave" and "Assassin's Creed."

He is currently nominated for an Emmy for his role in HBO's "Lovecraft Country." A win at the September 19 ceremony would be his first in five nominations, surprisingly none of them for "The Wire."

HBO released the following statement:

"We are devastated to learn of the passing of Michael Kenneth Williams, a member of the HBO family for more than 20 years. While the world is aware of his immense talents as an artist, we knew Michael as a dear friend who was beloved by all who had the privilege to work with him. We send our deepest condolences to his family for this immeasurable loss."
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member
back in the day black beauties and 714's, tons of mexi brick
then came cocaine, changed everything
I had a brother, a lawyer by trade. an older one I adored
He had a wild mane of raven black hair and beard with a patch of white
we called him buffalo
he loved his cocaine
the ether smelled and the dope sang it's song of despair
then came the bank chases , the adrenaline rushes
robbing banks was fun , getting caught was another story
a Ronin on the loose, a follower to none, and crazy as a loon
locked in his fortress of solitude, crazed by indifference he's nothing but a thought
RIP Buffalo
 

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