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momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
I've not been a fan of using Everclear or 151 for tincture because of the way it burns sublingually. Makes it hard to take it regularly... and there are those who cannot tolerate (or should not be using) alcohol. So I'm wondering if this isn't the answer... apple cider vinegar has other health benefits and is much, much cheaper. So this seems like a winner imo.

Apple Vinegar Cannabis Tincture

Apple Vinegar Tincture is another way to extract the compounds from the Cannabis Plant with out the use of alcohol. It can be used in recipes or by the drop just like other tinctures for medicating or simply relaxing.

Ingredients

1/2 ounce dried cannabis buds or sugar leaf trim chopped up, make sure to decarb the cannabis first so the THC is activated

3 cups apple cider vinegar

Large Mason Jar

Scissors and Cheesecloth/Strainer

Directions

1. Place chopped up cannabis in mason jar

2. Add the apple cider vinegar into mason jar

3. Close lid and shake vigorously for a few minutes

4. Place glass jar in a dark place like a kitchen cabinet or pantry.

5. Shake the jar every couple a days for a few minutes for at least 10 days , 30 days is better.

6. Strain the tincture with cheesecloth into another clean mason jar. You can also use a funnel and put some in small tincture bottles.

7. Your Apple Vinegar Tincture is ready to enjoy in recipes that you choose or simply add drops in your mouth.


Here's another article about using vinegar as a solvent:

Vinegar: the Vintage Solvent


… he should eat hot pieces of bread, dipped in dark wine and oil, drink very little, and labor much, and live on well-fed pork, boiled with vinegar, so that he may be able to endure hard exercises. – Hippocrates

Long before and after Hippocrates, herbalists concocted aceta, or vinegar extracts, to cure their ills. As distilled alcohol became more widely available, herbal tinctures, or alcohol-based extracts, replaced aceta in the market. Tinctures, being stronger, longer-lasting, hygienically reliable, and more consistent than aceta dominate the botanical extract market today.

However, aceta deserve a second look. Shrewd herbalists value vinegar as an inexpensive, simple, safe, natural, and alcohol-free solvent, for extracting botanicals. Centuries of using vinegar for medicinal extracts substantiates its effectiveness and safety for home remedies.

What makes vinegar a good solvent for botanical extracts? Vinegar contains mostly water and a little acetic acid. Together, these two solvents, or media for dissolving botanical compounds, effectively extract a broader suite of phytochemicals, or herbal compounds, without the effects that alcohol has on cell membrane proteins.

Water. Water dissolves so many substances that it’s known as the “universal solvent.” The popularity and effectiveness of herbal teas, or infusions, attests to water’s effectiveness as a solvent. Water’s polar molecules weakly bond with each other and readily split many molecules into their positive and negative ions. Mineral salts, for example, readily dissolve in water. Lipids and other non-polar substances do not readily dissolve in water.

Water constitutes 88 to 96 percent of most vinegars. Many phytochemicals, or chemicals, like anthocyanins, phenols, tannins, and flavonoids, that come from plants, readily dissolve in water. The iced tea sold with meals in many restaurants, black tea (Camellia sinensis), contains flavonoids, a group of water soluble pigments. Evidence suggests that they reduce the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels in the blood[1].

Acetic Acid. Acetic acid makes up four- to twelve-percent of vinegar’s content, making it slightly acidic. Alkaloids, an important group of medicinally important plant chemicals, dissolve better in such acidic liquids, as do many mineral salts and alkaline phytochemicals. The acetic acid provides the additional benefit of prolonging the shelf life of the extract by fixing the solution and keeping it stable over time.

Other Ingredients. Vinegars also contain other ingredients in trace amounts and add to the medicinal and nutritional value of the extract. The abundance and type of trace components varies with the type of vinegar used in the acetum.

Although tinctures dominate the liquid botanical market, herbalists still value vinegar as a solvent to extract phytochemicals. Its added nutritional and medicinal qualities make it is a safe and versatile solvent that for internal and external use. The taste of many aceta make them great additions to spice rack as well as the medicine cabinet!


[1] Deka, A., and J. A. Vita. 2011. Tea and cardiovascular disease, Pharmacological Research 64 (2): 136-145; (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.phrs.2011.03.009.), reviewed 5 October 2014.

 
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Killick

Well-Known Member
I was going to post another acv recipe but Moms is better.

An interesting thing I learned while processing apples last year was how to make apple cider vinegar. It requires apple peels, apple cores, distilled water, and a bit of apple cider vinegar mother (the sediment that floats in acv). Let them soak together, strain, and enjoy. It's an easy thing to make.

I'm coming around in my thinking about tinctures and solvents. The more aggressive solvents requite purging to remove things that aren't meant to be consumed by living beings. Alcohol works, but it's expensive to buy and tricky to make. Plus it's a toxin.

Dry sift, and bubble extraction, are both simple and straightforward and can be pressed into BHO-like consistency. Vinegar makes a great tincture. Why are people still bothering with toxic solvents? Mostly speed, although purging tends to defeat these gains.

There are decent alternatives available that are cheap and non-toxic. Butane is for torches, alcohol is for daiquiris, water is for life, vinegar is mostly water, and good for you.

Thanks for a great post @momofthegoons . This is a great group you've been sheparding along. It doesn't seem like 2 years! :)
 
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Baron23

Well-Known Member

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
So, since THC and other cannibinoids do NOT dissolve in water.....how the heck is this supposed to be an effective solvent for tinctures?
The water will break down some of the plant materials... and my guess is it's the acetic acid that breaks down the THC and cannabinoids. The two combined (water and acetic acid) become the carrier. And just like you have to shake apple cider vinegar, you probably have to shake a tincture made with it.
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
Has anyone here actually tried to make an extract from apple cider vinegar? I'd really like to know more before sacrificing a jar of herb.

A couple years ago my wife tried the vinegar diet. She drank something like a teaspoon a day. After a few weeks she did lose weight but then her gut acted up and ended up in the hospital for a few days. Not sure what the vinegar did, but she also has ibs so it probably was a factor. The doc said no more vinegar diets for her. But a tincture used in food might be ok?

Pickled weed, lol.
 
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arb

Semi shaved ape
So, Hippocrates was into Pork Adobo? haha



So, since THC and other cannibinoids do NOT dissolve in water.....how the heck is this supposed to be an effective solvent for tinctures?
I am with you and science on this one............some avb should work for a.quick check and see?
I love white vinegar as a cleaner it is way better than toxic chemicals imo.
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
I've made both ACV from apple scraps, as well as dabbled in the tincture piece. Not seriously, as back then I was all about solvents. My plan is to get an amount of ACV and run it through the sonicator with some decarbed herb, and maybe try a batch with decarbed dry sift (already clean trichomes) and see what they look like.

@Shredder was it ACV she was using? It's also used to help deal with gut issues. Having said that cannabis only works on 95% of people who use it medicinally, so tyere is always room for an issue.
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-proven-health-benefits-of-apple-cider-vinegar#section5
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
I am with you and science on this one............some avb should work for a.quick check and see?
I love white vinegar as a cleaner it is way better than toxic chemicals imo.

I put white vinegar in spray bottles and use it to kill grass, lol.

I've made both ACV from apple scraps, as well as dabbled in the tincture piece. Not seriously, as back then I was all about solvents. My plan is to get an amount of ACV and run it through the sonicator with some decarbed herb, and maybe try a batch with decarbed dry sift (already clean trichomes) and see what they look like.

@Shredder was it ACV she was using? It's also used to help deal with gut issues. Having said that cannabis only works on 95% of people who use it medicinally, so tyere is always room for an issue.
https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-proven-health-benefits-of-apple-cider-vinegar#section5

She used Braggs apple vinegar.


I did a quick google search on this subject, but didn't find a whole lot. I did see a couple mentions that it was not very efficient for extracting. I did find the above article, but no glowing reviews. And that reminds me of another water based extractor, vegetable glycerin. That didn't work very well for me when I tried it as a tincture.

I guess if you want to take it anyway, ya sure add some weed. But I don't think I'd make it just for the weed aspect. Much better alternatives. We make a tincture with rosin and organic hemp oil ( the health food store type hemp oil, not the gas station faux CBD, lol) hemp oil is a light oil with an almost neutral taste so the rosin terp taste comes through fairly well.
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
Ouch re spouse. The usual dose is 1/2 teaspoon once or twice a day. I have clients who make infused acv gummies with good success, but not everyone works in the same way. Was she using CBD or cannabis in conjunction with the acv? CBD may help with the gastric distress (maybe. What do I know ;)


VG has a boundary layer. Of you can keep it in motion that will help your extraction. Skunk Pharm suggests a case tumbler or rock polisher for agitation. Here's the link. You can spend hours surfing info here...
https://skunkpharmresearch.com/glycerin-extraction/
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
Ouch re spouse. The usual dose is 1/2 teaspoon once or twice a day. I have clients who make infused acv gummies with good success, but not everyone works in the same way. Was she using CBD or cannabis in conjunction with the acv? CBD may help with the gastric distress (maybe. What do I know ;)
/

She vapes high thc herb, and we both take cannacaps with half CBD at night.

I guess her problem could be unrelated to the vinegar. Just a IBS flare up, but the doctors told her to drop the vinegar diet. I don't remember how long she was on it, but up until her getting sick she loved the effects. She lost weight and felt she had more energy.
 

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