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Meds Cannabis Antibiotics

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis Antibiotics to Fight MRSA

Some bacteria nowadays are evolving so fast that scientists cannot catch up with them. Already, some illnesses that have been successfully treated before cannot be dealt with today. To eliminate the risk of dying from once treatable diseases, we resort to alternative remedies.



One of the reasons for the lack of development in medicine is the fact that during the last few decades, no new classes of antibiotics have been found. However, the current fascination of the world with cannabis leads to new research. In the depths of marijuana studies, scientists hope to find novel antibiotics of the natural world.

Thus far, the plant has successfully proved its benefits in treating various ailments. Its phytochemicals help patients deal with the consequences of chemotherapy, reduce epileptic seizures, and provide pain relief. Moreover, it is one of those rare remedies that can be used by children.





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One of the most recent findings states that the resin that coats marijuana buds contains potent antibiotics. The plant's antibacterial properties have already been studied and claimed to be effective. In addition, scientists have shown the world that cannabinoids can beat Staphylococcus aureus resistant to meticillin—a narrow-spectrum antibiotic of the penicillin class.

Scientists knew about the antibacterial properties of the plant long ago. At first, cannabis was used as an antiseptic for mouth and skin. In addition, it is believed that this plant developed cannabinoids to have them serve as an external immune system that would protect it from environmental dangers.





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Weed has proved to be effective as an antibiotic. However, scientists still do not know how exactly its compounds work. They assumed that cannabinoids had the same targets as common antibiotics, but studies have revealed that they do not.

All in all, the plant produces more than a hundred different cannabinoids with antibacterial properties. However, there are five compounds that have the most potential.

The constant medical focus is on cannabidiol (CBD). This non-psychoactive cannabinoid has been studied a lot lately due to its effectiveness against seizures. Its rich list of useful properties also contains the ability to fight infection. According to the studies, cannabinoids are unaffected by the mechanism that superbugs use to evade antibiotics. In addition, scientists believe that, in the future, we will not have to use the psychoactive THC to treat infections. CBD can be extracted from hemp plants to create cheap antibiotics.

Though THC is less popular than CBD in the medical community, it has strong antibacterial properties as well. Researchers find that almost immediately after this cannabinoid is isolated, it can kill streptococci and staphylococci, which cause a wide variety of diseases.

Cannabinol (CBN) is a breakdown product of THC. Alongside the two previous compounds, this cannabinoid is one of the few chemicals that can treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

The next compound is less discussed than its “siblings” but is present in some strains in equal ratios to CBD. Cannabichromene, CBC, was studied back in 1981. The researchers found that it not only had antibacterial properties but was also effective against such common bugs as E. coli and Candida albicans.

The last compound that can be used as an antibiotic is cannabigerol (CBG). It is like a stem cell or a template that fosters all other cannabinoids. It is abundant in young plants and differentiates into various cannabinoids as the plant matures. Previously, CBG showed modest antibacterial properties. Lately, it has been considered effective against MRSA as well.

Again I say, wow..... is there anything that Cannabis can't be effective for?
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Is Marijuana The Next Big Antibiotic?

When it comes to marijuana legalization, we should be talking more about antibiotics. Studies have shown that compounds in cannabis effectively kill current antibiotic-resistant superbugs like MRSA.

The majority of the arguments surrounding marijuana legalization focus on psychoactive THC. In general, anti-marijuana activists don’t want to legalize yet another mind-altering substance. But, focusing the legalization conversation on THC alone ignores perhaps one of the most important qualities of the cannabis plant: its antibiotic and antiseptic properties.

What Is Antibiotic Resistance?

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Only two new class of antibiotics have been introduced in the past 30 years. This fact is quite scary, especially considering that we developed 20 new classes between 1940 and 1962. Bacteria and microbes evolve at a much faster rate than we’re able to intelligently prevent them. As far as antibiotics go, it’s us versus nature and nature is winning.

An antibiotic is a tool that we can use to kill off the majority of harmful bacteria in any given body or space. Where we get into trouble is with the remaining bacteria that survived. These bacteria are the strongest of the bunch, and they continue to multiply with their antibiotic resistant genes.

We’ve been abusing antibiotics for quite some time. Antibiotic resistance really began shortly after we first started mass-producing them. In a famous example, a round of penicillin was preemptively dispatched to prostitutes near army bases in Vietnam in order to prevent soldiers from getting gonorrhea.

Shortly after, a new strain of penicillin-resistant gonorrhea popped up. Gonnorhea is now resistant to many different antibiotics. This has been extremely concerning for the U.S. Center for Disease Control, which has issued several laboratory recommendations to halt the progression of resistance.

Back in 1935, cannabis tablets were used to treat gonorrhea. But, the 1937 Marihuana Tax Act put and end to the medical distribution of cannabis in the US. The era also lacked the scientific means to extract and test the individual antibiotic properties of the herb. This meant that cannabis was not isolated as an effective cure, but rather a way to mitigate some of the symptoms.

Today, there are five major reasons why we continue to lose the battle against bacterium and microbes:

  • Overprescription of antibiotics by doctors
  • Overuse of antibiotics in animal agriculture
  • Improper consumption of antibiotics by patients
  • Overuse of household products that contain antibiotics
  • Overuse of cosmetics and toiletries that contain antibiotics
No studies have come out recently that test the efficacy of specific cannabinoids against gonorrhea using modern technology. But, compounds found in weed have been found to kill off some of the most major superbugs of our time.

MRSA

(Note: this video contains graphic images of MRSA wounds.)

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an extremely painful type of staph infection that is difficult to treat. Some strains of MRSA are even immune to Vancomycin, the strongest antibiotic that we have as a human species. Vancomycin is only used as a drug of last resort.

MRSA can lead to a very serious systemic bacterial infection if it makes it into an open wound. This is an infection that can lead to permanent disability if not cleared. We’re talking years of physical therapy, excruciating long-term stays in the hospital, and even death in those with weakened immune systems.

As early as 2008, scientists in Italy and the UK found that five of the most common cannabinoids were effective at killing six different strains of MRSA. The cannabinoids they tested are:

  • cannabidiol (CBD)
  • cannabichromene (CBC)
  • cannabigerol (CBG)
  • delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)
  • cannabinol (CBN)
In their research, study authors Giovanni Appendino these and Simon Gibbons found something amazing. These cannabinoids are as effective as Vancomycin when it comes to killing MRSA. They also do so in a different way than what we commonly expect from antibiotics, making them especially meaningful when it comes to treating microbial infections.

MIT Technology Review reported that cannabinoids “appear to be unaffected by the mechanism that superbugs like MRSA use to evade existing antibiotics.”

Further, the researchers found that the cannabinoids with the most antibacterial properties were non-psychoactive. “What this means is,” Appendino explains to MIT journalist Nora Schultz, “we could use fiber hemp plants that have no use as recreational drugs to cheaply and easily produce potent antibiotics.”

The Appendino/ Gibbons study also hinted that marijuana compounds could be a potential cure for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis as well. Though, more research is needed to test just how potent cannabinoids can be.

How can this be possible? To the marijuana plant, cannabinoids function like an external immune system. They’re chemicals that help protect the plant from disease and other environmental factors that might harm them. So, it really makes quite a lot of sense that these compounds could be quite useful in killing bacteria in humans and animals as well.

Cannabis Topicals

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A marijuana topical is a weed-infused cream, balm, or lotion. Not only are they great for relieving pain, but their antibiotic properties also make them powerful natural remedies for minor skin abrasions and irritations.

Researcher Appendino agrees that non-psychoactive marijuana topicals have a valuable medical use. “The most practical application of cannabinoids would be as topical agents to treat ulcers and wounds in a hospital environment, decreasing the burden of antibiotics,” he tells Schultz.

One Colorado-based company, Mary’s Medicinals, has gone beyond topicals by creating a transdermal patch. While patches that include activated THC may still be psychoactive, Mary’s Medicinals sells CBD and CBN transdermal patches as well. These two compounds have antibiotic properties.

If you’re interested in testing out the power of marijuana creams yourself, here are a couple homemade recipes to get you going:

Opting for cannabis-based cosmetics over conventional antibiotic containing makeup and cleansers is one way to ease away from antibiotic overuse. As research suggests, the cannabis plant may provide a more human-friendly alternative. Using natural bacteria-fighting cannabinoids may reduce instances of disease and helps us all live better as a species.

 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
I have used cannabis infused oils and/or my cannabis salve on various skin issues in the past (burns, rash, cuts, etc.) and found that it promotes healing immensely. I think it's a combination of the antibiotic elements and the moisture of the oils (especially coconut oil) that heals. In any case, I highly recommend trying it for topical issues.

5 Ways The Cannabis Plant Could Be A Revolutionary Antibiotic


Since 1987, only one new class of antibiotic has been found. This is a frightening fact, as bacteria are some of the fastest evolving organisms on the planet. Already, several common strains of bacteria have become resistant to antibiotics, putting patients at risk of dying from once treatable diseases like staph infection and tuberculosis. Now, researchers are turning to the natural world in hopes of finding novel antibiotics, and cannabis is a major plant of interest.

The antibacterial properties of cannabis



The wonders of the cannabis plant continue to amaze both the medical community and herb lovers alike. Thus far, phytochemicals found only in cannabis have successfully reduced epileptic seizures, eased chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, and provided relief to those with chronic pain and muscle spasms caused by multiple sclerosis.

However, there is another major medical use for the plant that researchers are only just beginning to explore. The crystally, psychoactive resin that coats cannabis flowers and leaves happen to contain potent antibiotics.

Thus far, scientists have only examined the antibacterial properties of the plant in the laboratory. Yet, several of the plant’s active compounds, called cannabinoids, have successfully beaten the dreaded methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).


Effective throughout history


Back in the 1950s, before chemist Dr. Rafael Mechoulam and his team first isolated tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), researchers looked heavily into topical antiseptic applications of cannabis for both the mouth and the skin.

While it sounds impressive, the antibacterial properties of cannabis aren’t all that surprising. The cannabis plant is thought to have developed cannabinoids as a type of external immune system, protecting the herb from environmental threats.

As reported by MIT Technology Review, Simon Gibbons of the School of Pharmacy at the University of London is optimistic, though perplexed, about the novel ways cannabis compounds seem to kill bacteria. He explains,

Everything points towards these compounds having been evolved by the plants as antimicrobial defenses that specifically target bacterial cells, but the actual mechanism by which they kill the bugs is still a mystery.

We’ve tested whether the cannabinoids affect common antibiotic targets like fatty acid synthesis or the [DNA-bending enzyme] DNA gyrase, but they don’t.

I really cannot hazard a guess how they do it, but their high potency as antibiotics suggests there must be a very specific mechanism

Simply stated, the cannabis plant has proven to be a powerful antibiotic, but just how it works is a bit of a mystery. The cannabis plant produces over 100 of these potential antimicrobial cannabinoids overall, plus a few hundred more aroma and flavor molecules that may boost the plant’s antimicrobial potential.

Here’s the scoop on the top five antibacterial compounds in the cannabis plant.


1. Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)


Soon after psychoactive THC was first isolated, researchers stumbled upon the chemical’s antibacterial effects. A paper published in 1976 found that a dose as small as 1-5 micrograms per milliliter of THC successfully killed streptococci and staphylococci two bacteria that cause strep through and the much-feared staph infection.

Though, the effective concentration jumped to 50 micrograms when tested in blood. Interestingly, the study found that gram-negative bacteria like E. coli and helicobacter pylori, which causes stomach ulcer, were resistant to isolated THC.

In a more recent study published in 2012, a full extract taken from cannabis seed and plants showed a moderate effectiveness against E. coli and a high effectiveness against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a gram-negative bacteria that can cause respiratory, skin, and urinary tract infections.

The full extract also was highly effective against Bacillus subtilis, a pathogen that causes food poisoning.


2. Cannabinol (CBN)


CBN is a breakdown product of THC. As cannabis plants age, more THC transforms into the less psychoactive CBN. Like THC, however, this aged cannabinoid has some potent antimicrobial properties.

In 2008, researchers Giovanni Appendino and Simon Gibbons treated MRSA with different cannabinoids in the lab.

MRSA is a very difficult to treat infection in humans since the pathogenic staphylococcus bacteria is no longer killed by antibiotics. They found that CBN was one of the five cannabinoids common cannabinoids that were effective against MRSA, the others included THC, CBD, CBC, and CBG.


3. Cannabidiol (CBD)


CBD has been making headlines due to its ability to put a stop to certain kinds ofepileptic seizures. Now, the nonpsychoactive cannabinoid seems to fight infection, too.

Amazingly, not only did CBD and other cannabinoids effectively kill MRSA, but they don’t seem to respond to the traditional ways that bacteria evade death by an antibiotic. According to Gibbons, the cannabinoids,

…appear to be unaffected by the mechanism that superbugs like MRSA use to evade existing antibiotics.

To make matters even better, medical professionals and researchers in the future may not even need to use psychoactive THC to treat potential infections. Rather, CBD, along with CBN, CBC, and CBG, do not cause the mind-altering high that cannabis is so famous for. Gibbons explains,

What this means is, we could use fiber hemp plants that have no use as recreational drugs to cheaply and easily produce potent antibiotics.


4. Cannabichromene (CBC)


While not often discussed, CBC is one of the most common cannabinoids in the cannabis plant. In some strains, particularly those of Afghani and Pakistani origin, CBC and CBD have been found in almost equal ratios. In 2008, Appendino and Gibbons found that CBC was also effective against MRSA.

Yet, they weren’t the only researchers to discover the bacteria-fighting potential of this chemical. Back in 1981, scientists discovered that CBC had strong antibacterial properties and mild antifungal properties against common bugs like E. coli and Candida albicans.

A year later, researchers again showed that CBC demonstrated strong antifungal and antibacterial properties in the laboratory.


5. Cannabigerol (CBG)


CBG is the cannabinoid that fosters all other cannabinoids, like a stem cell or a template. Both THC, CBD, and CBC are breakdown products of CBG acid, which is most abundant early on in the growth cycle. As cannabis plants age and mature, this CBG differentiates into different cannabinoids.

In early research, this nonpsychoactive cannabinoid demonstrated modest antibacterial and antifungal effects. Now, like the other cannabinoids on this list, CBG has been found effective against MRSA.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabidiol is a Powerful New Antibiotic

San Francisco, CA – June 23, 2019 – New research has found that Cannnabidiol is active against Gram-positive bacteria, including those responsible for many serious infections (such as Staphyloccocus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae), with potency similar to that of established antibiotics such as vancomycin or daptomycin. The research is presented at ASM Microbe, the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology.

Cannabidiol, the main non-psychoactive chemical compound extracted from cannabis and hemp plants, has been approved by FDA for the treatment of a form of epilepsy, and is being investigated for a number of other medical conditions, including, anxiety, pain and inflammation. While there is limited data to suggest Cannabidiol can kill bacteria, the drug has not been thoroughly investigated for its potential as an antibiotic.

Work led by Dr Mark Blaskovich at The University of Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience’s Centre for Superbug Solutions, in collaboration with Botanix Pharmaceuticals Ltd, an early stage drug discovery company investigating topical uses of synthetic cannabidiol for a range of skin conditions, found that Cannabidiol was remarkably effective at killing a wide range of Gram-positive bacteria, including bacteria that have become resistant to other antibiotics, and did not lose effectiveness after extended treatment.

“Given cannabidiol’s documented anti-inflammatory effects, existing safety data in humans, and potential for varied delivery routes, it is a promising new antibiotic worth further investigation,” said Dr. Blaskovich. “The combination of inherent antimicrobial activity and potential to reduce damage caused by the inflammatory response to infections is particularly attractive.”

Importantly, the drug retained its activity against bacteria that have become highly resistant to other common antibiotics. Under extended exposure conditions that lead to resistance against vancomycin or daptomycin, Cannabidiol did not lose effectiveness. Cannabidiol was also effective at disrupting biofilms, a physical form of bacteria growth that leads to difficult-to-treat infections.

The project was co-funded by Botanix and Innovation Connections, an Australian government grant scheme to commercialize new products, processes and services. The paper will be presented on Sunday June 23rd from 11am-1 pm at the annual conference of the American Society for Microbiology, ASM Microbe 2019, at the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco.

###

ASM Microbe is the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, held June 20th through 24th in San Francisco, California.

The American Society for Microbiology is the largest single life science society, composed of more than 30,000 scientists and health professionals. ASM's mission is to promote and advance the microbial sciences.

ASM advances the microbial sciences through conferences, publications, certifications and educational opportunities. It enhances laboratory capacity around the globe through training and resources. It provides a network for scientists in academia, industry and clinical settings. Additionally, ASM promotes a deeper understanding of the microbial sciences to diverse audiences.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Thus far, scientists have only examined the antibacterial properties of the plant in the laboratory.
I am keeping my excitement in check. Its one thing to put a substance in a petri dish with a bacterial agent and see the results....in vitro, right. its entirely another to do it in the blood stream...in vivo, right?

Perhaps I'm being overly negative.
 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
I'm hopeful. I'm allergic to most antibiotics, with zithromax the only thing left for me to take outside of being hospitalized, and it's given with extreme caution as I can become allergic at any time. It isn't appropriate for every infection, so it's only a matter of time before I get a bug it doesn't work on. Right now, I have an infected tooth, fever, chills, headache, nausea, and am hanging on to see my doctor tomorrow to see if anything can be done before I get a septic infection sets in. I don't want to go to the ER and have to fight with a doctor about not taking something on my allergy list, and I don't want an anaphylactic reaction. If there is a way there can be a new antibiotic from cannabis, put me on the list. :weed:
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
Dr. Murakami is the founder of and a teacher at the naturopathic facility, Dr. E Murakami Centre for Lyme Research in Canada. His first Lyme patient came to him 20 years ago in his hometown of Hope, British Columbia. His success in treating this patient and the next resulted in continuing referrals and he quickly established a reputation for having exceptional skill when it comes to the treatment of Lyme.

https://www.medicaljane.com/2015/05/22/doctor-believes-cannabidiol-paste-could-be-a-potential-cure-for-lyme-disease/

Here's an interesting article on antibiotic resistant infection...

Some scientists say Lyme’s “biofilm” form is its most elusive. It’s in this form where the bacteria hide themselves in a complex mixture for protection against antibiotics. But the study found stevia leaf extract actually killed all forms of the Lyme germ, including its biofilm form.

https://draxe.com/stevia-kills-lyme-disease/

Mod note: Posts merged.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
Here's an interesting article on antibiotic resistant infection...

Some scientists say Lyme’s “biofilm” form is its most elusive. It’s in this form where the bacteria hide themselves in a complex mixture for protection against antibiotics. But the study found stevia leaf extract actually killed all forms of the Lyme germ, including its biofilm form.

https://draxe.com/stevia-kills-lyme-disease/
Well, stevia is easy enough to grow. I'll toss some seeds in a pot, so if a tick attacks I'll be ready.
Thanks @Killick .
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
@Madri-Gal resistant bacteria has a biofilm that makes it resistant. The premise for stevia extract is that it helps remove the biofilm, allowing antibiotics to work as intended. Intake of stevia extract could help traditional medications work as intended. It could also allow other antibacterial meds, such as cannabis and/or CBD, to be more potent against these same infections.

The article mentions that alcohol-extracted stevia was more affective than water-extracted stevia. I have a bottle of vanilla stevia, made using amber rum. A little splash goes into most drinks.

The worst thing that can happen is that it does nothing at all. That's the beauty of most plant-based meds.
 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
@Madri-Gal resistant bacteria has a biofilm that makes it resistant. The premise for stevia extract is that it helps remove the biofilm, allowing antibiotics to work as intended. Intake of stevia extract could help traditional medications work as intended. It could also allow other antibacterial meds, such as cannabis and/or CBD, to be more potent against these same infections.

The article mentions that alcohol-extracted stevia was more affective than water-extracted stevia. I have a bottle of vanilla stevia, made using amber rum. A little splash goes into most drinks.

The worst thing that can happen is that it does nothing at all. That's the beauty of most plant-based meds.
Isn't it wonderful how that works? I have dried stevia and stevia extract from last year, but I don't get through it very fast. Antibiotics aren't my thing, so I avoid them, but I can see this being helpful for other people.
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
It's more about making previously untreatable illness, such as Lyme's, with something plant based and readily available. Combined with another plant based med it's a whole new treatment modality.

All hail plants :)
 

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