Sponsored by

PuffItUp VapeFully Dynavap Vaposhop
  • Welcome to VaporAsylum! Please take a moment to read our RULES and introduce yourself here.
  • Did you know we have lots of smilies for you to use?
  • Need help navigating the forum? Find out how to use our features here.

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
CAN MARIJUANA RESTORE MEMORY? NEW STUDY SHOWS CANNABIS CAN REVERSE COGNITIVE DECLINE IN MICE
By Hannah Osborne On Monday, May 8, 2017 - 11:00


Marijuana plants are seen at Ganja Farms marijuana store in Bogota, Colombia, February 10, 2016. THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, has been shown to reverse cognitive decline in old mice. Photo: John Vizcaino/Reuters


Marijuana appears to improve the memory and learning abilities of old mice. Scientists discovered low doses of its main psychoactive ingredient—cannabinoid THC—can reverse the age-related decline in cognitive abilities, a finding that could lead to scientists figuring out a way of slowing brain aging in humans.

Researchers are increasingly examining THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) for its potential medical benefits. In the U.K., Oxford University recently launched a £10 million ($13 million) program to “identify new medical therapies through research into the molecular, cellular and systems mechanisms of cannabinoids.” Meanwhile, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has now approved several medications derived from THC.

Many scientists are currently looking at its potential use as a treatment for neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease.

Subscribe to Newsweek from $1 per week

In a study published in Nature Medicine on Monday, researchers led by Andreas Zimmer, from the University of Bonn, Germany, have shown how THC can provide significant benefits to mice when it comes to age-related cognitive decline.

THC interacts with receptors in the brain’s endocannabinoid system, which is involved in many physiological functions, including pain, mood, memory and appetite. Previous research has also shown activity in the endocannabinoid system declines as we get older, indicating it plays a role in the progression of aging.

To study what effect THC has on the aging brain, scientists gave low doses of THC to mice at three different life stages—two months, 12 months and 18 months. The latter two groups represented mature and old age.

The team carried out three experiments. The first involved a water maze, where mice have to learn and then remember how to navigate their way to the end. In a control group, mature and old mice performed worse than the young group. However, when treated with THC, the older groups improved at the task, while the young mice fared far worse. (The study’s authors noted that this was in “good agreement with the known detrimental effects of THC on cognition in young animals and humans.”

Next, they created a task where mice had to locate a specific object. Older mice treated with THC performed to the same standard as young mice that had not been given the drug. A third test relating to partner recognition also showed THC led to improved memory in mature and older mice. “Together, these results reveal a profound, long-lasting improvement of cognitive performance resulting from a low dose of THC treatment in mature and old animals,” the scientists write.

Further research showed what might cause the improvement, with THC appearing to restore hippocampal gene transcription patterns—activity in the brain relating to memory and learning—to a similar state seen in young mice.

The team argues that while they do not yet know if these findings would be same in humans, it could lead to new treatments to prevent cognitive decline in older people: “Cannabis preparations and THC are used for medicinal purposes,” they write. “They have an excellent safety record and do not produce adverse side-effects when administered at a low dose to older individuals. Thus, chronic, low-dose treatment with THC or cannabis extracts could be a potential strategy to slow down or even to reverse cognitive decline in the elderly.”

Zameel Cader, associate professor in clinical neurosciences at Oxford University, is involved in the institution’s $13 million cannabis research project. Commenting on the Nature Medicine study, he tells Newsweek the paper is “very interesting on a number of levels.”

“First of all there’s clearly growing interest in the potential therapeutic role of cannabinoids and in this particular case THC on various human conditions,” he says. “This paper is addressing a possible role for that compound in memory and cognition, which is relevant to disorders such as Alzheimer’s and other dementias.”

He said that while it is important to remember the study was carried out on mouse models, the differences in the effect of the drug on younger animals versus older animals tells us a lot about our understanding of the differences between old and young brains.

Moving this research forward, however, will be problematic: “Testing in humans is going to be difficult. This is a challenge faced by anyone wanting to develop a therapy for a human disorder such as dementia. Human lifespan is very extensive. So the question would be, when would be the most appropriate time to give these kinds of medications? Over what period of time do you need to evaluate the effects? In humans it could be years before an effect is noticed.”

“Finally, there is the issue surrounding safety. With a cannabinoid like THC, which does have adverse effects in certain individuals, there would be worries about the chronic dosing of this kind of medicine. We would need to assess the safety first before going into seeing whether it would improve cognition."
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
CAN MARIJUANA RESTORE MEMORY? NEW STUDY SHOWS CANNABIS CAN REVERSE COGNITIVE DECLINE IN MICE
By Hannah Osborne On Monday, May 8, 2017 - 11:00


Marijuana plants are seen at Ganja Farms marijuana store in Bogota, Colombia, February 10, 2016. THC, the active ingredient in cannabis, has been shown to reverse cognitive decline in old mice. Photo: John Vizcaino/Reuters


Marijuana appears to improve the memory and learning abilities of old mice. Scientists discovered low doses of its main psychoactive ingredient—cannabinoid THC—can reverse the age-related decline in cognitive abilities, a finding that could lead to scientists figuring out a way of slowing brain aging in humans.

Researchers are increasingly examining THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) for its potential medical benefits. In the U.K., Oxford University recently launched a £10 million ($13 million) program to “identify new medical therapies through research into the molecular, cellular and systems mechanisms of cannabinoids.” Meanwhile, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has now approved several medications derived from THC.

Many scientists are currently looking at its potential use as a treatment for neurological conditions, including multiple sclerosis, epilepsy and Parkinson’s disease.

Subscribe to Newsweek from $1 per week

In a study published in Nature Medicine on Monday, researchers led by Andreas Zimmer, from the University of Bonn, Germany, have shown how THC can provide significant benefits to mice when it comes to age-related cognitive decline.

THC interacts with receptors in the brain’s endocannabinoid system, which is involved in many physiological functions, including pain, mood, memory and appetite. Previous research has also shown activity in the endocannabinoid system declines as we get older, indicating it plays a role in the progression of aging.

To study what effect THC has on the aging brain, scientists gave low doses of THC to mice at three different life stages—two months, 12 months and 18 months. The latter two groups represented mature and old age.

The team carried out three experiments. The first involved a water maze, where mice have to learn and then remember how to navigate their way to the end. In a control group, mature and old mice performed worse than the young group. However, when treated with THC, the older groups improved at the task, while the young mice fared far worse. (The study’s authors noted that this was in “good agreement with the known detrimental effects of THC on cognition in young animals and humans.”

Next, they created a task where mice had to locate a specific object. Older mice treated with THC performed to the same standard as young mice that had not been given the drug. A third test relating to partner recognition also showed THC led to improved memory in mature and older mice. “Together, these results reveal a profound, long-lasting improvement of cognitive performance resulting from a low dose of THC treatment in mature and old animals,” the scientists write.

Further research showed what might cause the improvement, with THC appearing to restore hippocampal gene transcription patterns—activity in the brain relating to memory and learning—to a similar state seen in young mice.

The team argues that while they do not yet know if these findings would be same in humans, it could lead to new treatments to prevent cognitive decline in older people: “Cannabis preparations and THC are used for medicinal purposes,” they write. “They have an excellent safety record and do not produce adverse side-effects when administered at a low dose to older individuals. Thus, chronic, low-dose treatment with THC or cannabis extracts could be a potential strategy to slow down or even to reverse cognitive decline in the elderly.”

Zameel Cader, associate professor in clinical neurosciences at Oxford University, is involved in the institution’s $13 million cannabis research project. Commenting on the Nature Medicine study, he tells Newsweek the paper is “very interesting on a number of levels.”

“First of all there’s clearly growing interest in the potential therapeutic role of cannabinoids and in this particular case THC on various human conditions,” he says. “This paper is addressing a possible role for that compound in memory and cognition, which is relevant to disorders such as Alzheimer’s and other dementias.”

He said that while it is important to remember the study was carried out on mouse models, the differences in the effect of the drug on younger animals versus older animals tells us a lot about our understanding of the differences between old and young brains.

Moving this research forward, however, will be problematic: “Testing in humans is going to be difficult. This is a challenge faced by anyone wanting to develop a therapy for a human disorder such as dementia. Human lifespan is very extensive. So the question would be, when would be the most appropriate time to give these kinds of medications? Over what period of time do you need to evaluate the effects? In humans it could be years before an effect is noticed.”

“Finally, there is the issue surrounding safety. With a cannabinoid like THC, which does have adverse effects in certain individuals, there would be worries about the chronic dosing of this kind of medicine. We would need to assess the safety first before going into seeing whether it would improve cognition."
Great article.....wait, what?....oh, great article.....oh, damn...what were we talking about...oh, great article....LOL
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis could cure dementia, says joint Israeli-German study

(JNS.org) A joint Israeli-German study has found that the primary psychoactive compound in the cannabis plant, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), may offer a cure for dementia.

Medical cannabis at Israel’s third annual CannaTech conference in March 2017. Credit: Adam Abrams.


Medical cannabis at Israel’s third annual CannaTech conference in March 2017. Credit: Adam Abrams.

The study, conducted by scientists at Germany’s University of Bonn and Israel’s Hebrew University of Jerusalem, discovered that THC improves cognitive functioning and memory performance when administered in small controlled doses in old mice.

The study also discovered that administering THC created an increased number of links between nerve cells in the brain, a crucial prerequisite for learning.

The findings may contribute to the development of new treatments for human cognitive disorders, most notably dementia.

“The treatment completely reversed the loss of performance in the old animals,” said Prof. Andreas Zimmer of Bonn University’s Institute of Molecular Psychiatry.

“The THC treatment induced molecular and epigenetic changes, which no longer corresponded to that of untreated old animals, but rather were similar to what we see in young animals,” said Hebrew University researcher Dr. Mona Dvir-Ginzberg.

Researchers now hope to conduct clinical trials to find out whether or not THC has the same positive effect in humans.

Hebrew University professor Raphael Mechoulam initially discovered THC in the 1960s. Since then, Israeli hospitals have demonstrated a willingness to perform clinical trials on the effectiveness of cannabis in relieving the symptoms of tens of thousands of patients suffering from chronic or terminal conditions.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Daily cannabis dose helps improve mice memories

SCIENTISTS at the University of Bonn in Germany have found a small daily dose of cannabis could slow down the decline of cognitive failure associated with ageing.

As part of a study investing the aging process of the brain, the researchers found the chemical tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) which gives users a high, has been found to improve memory and learning in older mice.

The researchers tested the effects of the drug on mice at several different stages in life and found lower doses of THC impaired that of younger mice, but boosted the brain performance in older rodents.

After 28 days of treatment with THC, the older mice made cognitive leaps and bounds as they regained the memory and learning skills of healthy younger mice.

Dr Andras Bilkei-Gorzo Bilkei-Gorzo and his team monitored the brain performance in mice aged two months, 12 months and 18 months.

After studying the cognitive function of the older mice who had been given a daily dose of cannabis, they found the animals memory and learning skills matched those of young mice who had not been given anything.

A report which appeared in a recent edition of respected journal Nature Medicine, revealed the mice aged two months and 18 months were tested to see how fast they could solve a water maze puzzle, and how quickly they could register familiar objects.

Without a daily dose of THC, the younger mice completed the tests with ease, while the older ones struggled to recognise mice they had previously met and solve the mental challenge.

However, while researchers hope this development could benefit those with dementia in the future, they are proceeding with scientific caution.

The research group said they are now planning on testing via a small-scale study on humans aged 60 to 70-years later in 2017.

No doubt they will have loads of volunteers offering to participate.

 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
Better With Age: Does Cannabis Ease Menopause Symtoms

Photo credit
SHARE

Many people assume that cannabis only impacts their brain. This is far from the truth. Cannabis actually engages with various systems in the body, including your reproductive system. Compounds in the herb actively interact with sex hormone estrogen, which is a key culprit behind menopause symptoms. This segment of our Better With Age series is dedicated to the ladies. We’ll address one major question: does cannabis ease menopause symptoms?

What is menopause?

Menopause is the period of a woman’s life in which menstruation stops. This typically happens while women are in their mid-40s to early 50s, with the average age of onset being 51 years old. Menopause marks the end of a woman’s reproductive capabilities.

There are three distinct phases of menopause: perimenopause, menopause, and postmenopause.

Perimenopause is the time before the end of menstruation during which the body slows down estrogen production. Estrogen is one of two primary sex hormones that trigger ovulation and menstruation. This slow down happens several years before menopause hits, with symptoms showing up 1 to 2 years before menopause proper.

During ovulation, estrogen levels peak. Yet, once menopause rolls around, ovulation stops entirely. This means that the body is no longer producing high levels of estrogen.

Menopause is the 12-month period after the last menstrual cycle. Postmenopause is just what it sounds like, the period after menopause is over. Menopausal symptoms ease once women enter the postmenopause phase.

The endocannabinoid system and menopause

Photo credit
Believe it or not, the endocannabinoid system (ECS) has a major part to play in menopause. The ECS is a network of cell receptors and the corresponding molecules that bind to them. The endocannabinoid system has many functions, but it primarily helps maintain homeostasis in the body.

Very simply explained, homeostasis is the optimum biochemical balance in the body. The endocannabinoid system helps regulate:

  • Body temperature
  • Immune function
  • Mood
  • Sleep
  • Pain
  • Appetite and energy metabolism
  • Reproductive cycles
Funny thing is, endocannabinoids are like the body’s own cannabis. Compounds in the cannabis plant (phytocannabinoids) directly interact and engage with the endocannabinoid system. When it comes to women’s reproductive health, endocannabinoids and estrogen go hand in hand.

When estrogen peaks, so do your levels of endocannabinoids. In fact, prior to menopause, women are most sensitive to psychoactive THC right before ovulation,when estrogen levels are highest.

Estrogen directly engages endocannabinoids. In fact, the enzyme that breaks down certain endocannabinoids (enzyme FAAH) is regulated by estrogen. As estrogen levels begin to drop, endocannabinoid levels change. The implications of these changes are under-researched at this point, but a handful of early studies shed some light on the possibilities.

Animal research has shown that estrogen recruits endocannabinoids to help regulate emotional response and mood. As estrogen levels decline, disruptions in the way the body handles endocannabinoids may contribute to menopause-associated mood swings.

Some suggest that endocannabinoid deficiency may contribute to early menopause. Endocannabinoid deficiency is a theoretical condition in which the body does not have a proper endocannabinoid tone, leading to a wide range of health problems.

Other studies have suggested that mutations in genes which code the endocannabinoid system may increase your risk of obesity and metabolic syndrome in postmenopausal women.

Cannabis and menopause symptoms

Photo credit
Using cannabis to ease menopausal symptoms is nothing new. Back in the 1920s, medical texts identified the herb as a potent analgesic for menopausal women. Back in 1889, a treatise on the use of cannabis indica as a rectal suppository was published.

While it may sound very unpleasant, he noted that the medicine seemed to ease many menopausal symptoms. These symptoms included:

[…] The excitement, the irritability, and pain in the neck of the bladder, flashes of heat, and cold. – Farlow

Now, over a century later, we have a slightly better understanding of how the herb may help menopausal women. Yet, unfortunately, very little research has been done on the subject since these early reports. We have federal cannabis prohibition to thank for that. But, here is what we do know based on the limited information available.

1. Hot flashes

Photo credit
There are no studies on cannabis and hot flashes specifically. But, it’s common knowledge that THC lowers your body temperature. In the body, THC replaces an endocannabinoid called anandamide.

This particular compound has many functions (and more are still being discovered), but one of its functions is temperature regulation. Endocannabinoids are part of your body’s thermostat.

When you consume THC, you alter the thermostat. Evidence from anecdotal and animal models suggest that THC has a cooling effect.

A few studies have found that THC lowers temperature in a dose-dependant fashion. The more you consume, the cooler you become. If you consume just a little THC, your body temperature may increase. So, next time you have a hot flash? Perhaps some cannabis will help lower you cool down.

2. Mood swings

Photo credit
Low estrogen levels during and after menopause may have a huge impact on your mood. As mentioned earlier, estrogen rounds up endocannabinoids to help maintain mood and reduce anxiety. Yet, when your estrogen levels drop, what’s left to trigger these molecules into action?

As always, more research is needed. Yet, we do know that there is strong evidence that cannabinoid therapy may boost mood. Where can you find supplemental cannabinoids? In cannabis.

Both THC and cannabidiol (CBD) have mood-lifting properties. In low doses, THC is a potent antidepressant. Nonpsychoactive CBD has been found to be an extremely fast-acting antidepressant in animal models. It also is a powerful anxiolytic. CBD can even help calm down anxiety produced by THC.

3. Bone loss

Photo credit
To build strong bones, your body needs estrogen. Each day, your bones go through a process of getting rid of old and damaged cells and replacing them with new, healthy cells. Estrogen regulates this process. As you get older and produce less estrogen, you are more susceptible to bone weakness and diseases like osteoporosis.

Turns out, some compounds in cannabis may be able to help with this.

A 2009 review found that alterations in genes that code cannabinoid receptors are associated with the onset of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The review also found that cannabinoid a cannabinoid treatment helped prevent bone loss associated with surgically induced menopause (ovariectomy).

They concluded that cannabinoid-based drugs may be a novel therapeutic approach for osteoporosis in the future.

In the case of bones, high CBD products may be most beneficial. For more information on cannabis and osteoporosis and osteoarthritis, check out our article here.

4. Supplementing Estrogen Replacement Therapy

Photo credit
Estrogen Replacement Therapy (ERT) is one of the most common ways to treat menopause and menopause-induced osteoporosis. Yet, ERT comes with its own bag of complications. Hormone therapy puts you at risk of breast cancer, dementia, heart attack, and stroke.

Though little research has been done on adding cannabinoids to ERT, there is a substantial amount of evidence that compounds in cannabis can protect against some of these major side effects. Anecdotal, cell line, and animal studies have found that THC and CBD have anti-tumor effects in breast cancer.

Other studies suggest that cannabinoids are neuroprotective and eliminate the primary neurotoxin associated with Alzheimer’s Disease. In the event of a stroke, cannabinoid treatment may help the brain recover faster and reduce the overall amount of damage from the event.

5. Sex drive

Photo credit
Loss of libido and trouble with lubrication are two major side effects of menopause. Fortunately, cannabis can help with both of these things. Not only is there THC-infused lube to help promote a nice, tingly sensation, but cannabis is a known libido enhancer for women. In fact, the herb’s aphrodisiac effects might work better in women than in men.

As a tip, THC may have the opposite effect on libido in high doses. Though, there hasn’t been any research to prove whether or not this is the case in menopausal women. So, it’s best to start slow and work up to a dose that seems to work best for you. If you’d like to try making your own cannabis lube, you can find a recipe here.

6. Weight gain

Photo credit
On average, women gain 5 lbs (2.2 kg) during menopause. Some women gain as much as 15 to 25 lbs (7 to 11 kg). This is partly due to genetic and lifestyle factors, but changes in estrogen also play a role. Weight gain after the age of 40 increases your risk for heart disease, depression, type 2 diabetes, and breast cancer.

Though cannabis is often associated with the munchies, recent research in humans has found that cannabinoids THCV and CBD may be useful in regulating metabolism and staving off type 2 diabetes.

Both cannabinoids improve insulin sensitivity and reduce the build up of liver fat. Animal studies have found that CBD is a mild appetite suppressant, encouraging weight loss.

The weight loss potential of cannabinoids has even gained the attention of the pharmaceutical industry. The anti-obesity drug Rimonabant was a synthetic cannabinoid that helped patients lose weight, decrease waist circumference, and increased good cholesterol.

However, Rimonabant just-so-happened to block a cell receptor that is critical to maintaining mood. So, it was pulled from the market after it caused patients to become suicidally depressed. It’s important to note that real cannabis is not associated with this risk.

7. Insomnia

Photo credit
Night sweats can keep you up at night. Not only does cannabis lower your body temperature, but it will also help you sleep through the night without tossing and turning.

As we get older, we tend to spend less time in restorative deep sleep and more time in lighter stages of the sleep cycle. Poor quality sleep increases your risk of dementia, diabetes, and other age-related diseases.

Cannabis increases the time you spend in deep sleep. Maintaining a good sleep schedule is vital for longevity and promoting healthy aging.

If you have trouble sleeping through the night, try a cannabis indica strain about an hour before you hit the hay. While sativa strains promote wakefulness, indica strains are deeply sedative. You’ll be drifting off in no time.

You can find more information on cannabis strains here.

8. Pain

Photo credit
Chronic pain is a surefire way to reduce your quality of life. Constant pain is associated with depression, insomnia, and increased stress. All three of those things, in turn, contribute to more pain and other age-related diseases.

While things like a healthy, nutrient-dense diet and plenty of moderate exercise and stretching can reduce pain over time, sometimes you need a little extra help.

Cannabis is an extremely powerful pain reliever with a higher margin of safety than many drugs. Those with either osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis often find quality relief with cannabis. The herb is also thought to be highly effective for neuropathic pain.

Both CBD and THC have pain-fighting properties, but they work best when they are combined with one another. The HERB team has written a lot about cannabis and pain over the years.

For more information on how cannabis can help, check out some of these articles:

Plant-based sources of estrogen

Photo credit
Cannabis isn’t the only plant that can help during menopause. Many plants contain compounds called phytoestrogens. Basically, phytoestrogens are plant estrogens.

Back in the 1980s, an animal study found that CBD and a cannabis flavonoid called apigenin engage estrogen receptors in high doses. Yet, it’s unclear what impact these compounds have in humans. Here are some of the more common phytoestrogens and medicinal herbs used for menopause:

  • Soy isoflavones
  • Flax seed
  • Chia seed
  • Red clover
  • Black cohosh
  • Wild yam
  • Ginseng
  • Skullcap
Unfortunately, not nearly enough research has been done to give precise answers on how cannabis affects menopause. Yet, the available literature thus far has positive signs. As with most things cannabis, the best way to find out if the herb works for you is to try it.

Keep in mind that there are many different types of cannabis available (ranging from nonpsychoactive to very psychoactive) and in many different forms.

For more details on how cannabis treatment may impact your body as you age, we encourage you to check out our Better With Age series. It’s loaded with awesome information, you won’t be disappointed.

Has cannabis helped you during menopause? Share with us on Facebook, Twitter, or in the comments below. We’d love to hear from you!

______________________________________________________________________________________
I'm on a medication called Tamoxifen. I am past menopause myself but I take this medication to help to guard against hormone related cancer. It causes terrible hot flashes throughout the day and night. I would like to stop taking this medication but am afraid to because I'm afraid I will be more susceptible to a reaccurance of breast cancer. I didn't realize that cannabis helped with hot flashes. When I took my last T-break I noticed an increase in my hot flashes.
CK
 
Last edited:

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
THC Found to Have Positive Effects on Cognitive Function in Elderly


As we age we’re faced with a variety of issues including cognitive decline such as memory, flexibility and learning. A recent study found that THC can positively impact learning and memory functions in older mice. The German research team found sufficient evidence that low-doses of THC can prevent and improve age-related cognitive decline in elders. Studies like these open a new door for conversations surrounding ways in which marijuana can ultimately replace traditional big pharma drugs.



Endocannabinoid System and Ageing
The Endocannabinoid system is responsible for a multitude of functions in our bodies from immunity to reproduction, it is also what responds to cannabis consumption. As the brain ages, the endocannabinoid system weakens, this is believed to be what leads to cognitive decline such as memory loss and learning abilities. The CB1 receptor, which is what responds to the classic effects of THC is also responsible for the maintenance of homeostasis in disease and health. Along with the number of connections between brain neurons, these receptor levels decrease as we age. This loss of connection, in turn, leads to an overall decrease in cognitive function. Very few clinical studies show the direct beneficial effect of cannabinoids on the endocannabinoid system, specifically ageing in humans, thus rendering the connection to be relatively inconclusive at the moment.


The Study: A Chronic Low Dose of THC Restores Cognitive Function in Old Mice
The study, conducted in spring 2017, analyzed both old and young mice over a 28 day period during which they were administered a consistent low dose of THC. After the 28 days, the mice were tested on several cognitive tests such as memory, learning and mental flexibility (the ability to adapt to changing instructions). During the test no THCwas present in the mice’s system, allowing the scientists to analyze effects specifically after chronic cannabis use. Normally older mice perform significantly worse when compared to young mice, however, after the 28 day period of THC administration, it was found that the old mice had similar brain functions as the younger THC free mice. Surprisingly, the young mice who were administered THC had impaired `and incredibly poor performance. In the older mice, it was found that THC increased the number of connections made in the hippocampus, a brain region in charge of learning, memory, stress and anxiety. The study concluded that with low dosage administration the old mice performed similarly to young mice. Incorporating low dosage cannabis can help encourage healthy cognitive ageing, and positively impact gene expression patterns.



It is important to note that the THC was administered and not consumed through smoke or other traditional ways of using cannabis. The low dose which was given is also up for question, rodents tend to have a much higher tolerance towards psychoactive substances than humans. If the same dose was administered to a human of 150 pounds, it would equal to one edible an hour, everyday for 28 days, which to the average user is much more than a low dosing. Humans and rodents metabolize cannabinoids in different ways at different rates, which is why it is vital to take caution and not jump to conclusions when analyzing studies like this. Another important note is how differently the older and younger mice were affected, a reminder that the effects of cannabis vary greatly between users. While the definition of a low dose for a human and a mouse may be different, cannabis consumption for elderly has positively shown to relieve and aid with many issues from cognitive function, pain and insomnia.



What's Next?
This study is still only the beginning, cannabis in healthcare still has a long way to go before being accepted and discussed within the mainstream. A lot is left up for discussion when it comes to cannabis effects on cognitive functions in elders, the individuals in charge of publishing the study stated that the evidence isn't yet conclusive if applied to humans. With the topic of legalized marijuana, more studies will be funded and reach mainstream interest. The big question is, what pharmaceuticals can marijuana replace and when? Ultimately, we are already seeing many different patients using medical marijuana, however, it hasn’t reached the point of taking the place of other drugs which although having higher risks and side effects, are recommended by many.



 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Yet another 'thumbs up' for cannabis for the elderly...... There's a video at the end of the article that I couldn't embed.

Elderly people should smoke POT to prevent memory loss, study claims

Cannabis revived brains of old mice - and could do the same in humans


  • A study by researchers in Germany found THC in cannabis slowed memory loss
  • Old mice regained their speed of memory and learning after consuming pot
  • The researchers are set to start human trials this year using the drug, just 2 months after Germany legalized medical marijuana
  • It comes as countries around the world race to understand the drug as medicine

Cannabis could help prevent memory loss in the elderly, a new study has found.
Researchers in Germany, who are set to begin human trials later this year, say the drug may even help delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease by slowing the brain's natural ageing process.
The mental power of older mice improved dramatically after they were given THC, the psychoactive part of marijuana that makes users 'high'.
In fact, their brain connections in the hippocampus - which controls learning, memory and emotions - were firing as well as those of young adults.
It's hoped the same may apply to humans, with trials expected to begin this year.

Psychologist Professor Andreas Zimmer of Bonn University in Germany said the findings are essential in the movement to understand cannabis as a form of medicine.
More than half of the highly influential United States has voted in favor of legalization for medical use, and Germany followed suit just two months ago.
'Chronic, low-dose treatment with THC or cannabis extracts could be a potential strategy to slow down or even reverse cognitive decline in the elderly,' he said.
'Together, these results reveal a profound, long-lasting improvement of cognitive performance resulting from a low dose of THC treatment in mature and old animals.
'THC treatment for 28 days restored the learning and memory performance of mature and old animals in the water maze, novel object location recognition and social recognition tests to the levels observed in young mice.'
His team whose findings are published in Nature Medicine say it's too early to say if their remarkable results could be achieved in patients.
But they offer hope that drugs based on cannabis or THC could be given to middle or old aged people.

Co-author Dr Andras Bilkei-Gorzo said: 'Cannabis abuse is age-dependent. It's a problem for younger rather than older people.
'In safe doses the compound could improve their brains. It's possible it could delay the onset of Alzheimer's disease, but that's pure speculation.
'We hope to start clinical trials by the end of the year with a hundred - or even hundreds - of people.'
Previous studies have suggested chemicals found in marijuana are effective against Alzheimer's disease.
In the latest experiments three groups of mice that were 18 (old), 12 (mature) and two months (young) were regularly injected with low doses of THC for 28 days.
The equivalent ages in human years would be 64, 58 and 20, respectively.
Both before and after the treatment they were challenged with a series of tasks that tested their learning and memory skills.
These included negotiating their way around a water maze, locating objects and recognising other mice.
In young mice THC impaired their performance. But the same therapy actually improved learning and memory in both of the older sets of animals.
Prior to receiving THC they did poorly. But afterwards they were as efficient as the young mice had been before being given the compound that, interestingly, reduced their mental skills.
Prof Zimmer, a psychiatrist at Bonn University, said THC boosted genes that control neurons in the hippocampus - restoring them to the same patterns observed in young animals.
Psychoactive compounds found in marijuana - such as THC - exert their actions on the nervous system by interacting with the endocannabinoid system which deals with pain.
This is the brain's own internal version of cannabis chemicals which becomes desensitized as people get older. It has even been linked with beginning the process that leads to Alzheimer's.
Prof Zimmer said the endocannabinoid system declines during ageing but a direct link with symptoms has not been shown.
When someone smokes cannabis THC binds to the endocannabinoid receptor called CB1. It is the interaction between the drug and this receptor that makes people feel high.
Prof Zimmer said: 'Here we show a low dose of THC reversed the age-related decline in cogntive performance of mice aged 12 and 18 months.
'THC treatment restored hippocampal gene transcription patterns such that the expression profiles of THC-treated mice aged 12 months closely resembled those of THC-free animals aged 2 months.'
The study was published in Nature Medicine.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
This Is How THC Affects You Differently At Every Age

Did you know that THC affects you differently as you get older? Early research suggests that cannabis is better for you as you age.


Photo credit

As it turns out, THC affects everyone differently as they age. Human research is limited. However, budding experiments using animal models have found that the psychoactive may slow down youngsters. Yet, new research suggests that it could be a vital preventative supplement for improving the mental faculties of adults. Here’s the scoop on how THC affects you at every age.

Pediatric cannabis

Photo credit
Surprisingly, cannabis medicines may prove to be safe and effective treatments for children. Cannabis is not something that should be given to children recreationally. Though no research is conclusive, exposure to cannabis early on is thought to lead to attention and memory problems later on. Yet, human studies have shown that compounds in the herb may be useful for some childhood diseases.

There is little to no research on how the long-term effects of pediatric cannabis medicines. However, two compounds in the plant have been safely given to children in clinical trials. Children have been treated with cannabidiol (CBD) and delta-8-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-8-THC) with little to no side effects.

A CBD in the form of a pharmaceutical drug, Epidiolex, has been found successful in phase II and III clinical trials for epilepsy. The cannabinoid is being explored as a potential treatment for both Dravet’s and Lenox Gastaut Syndrome.

Delta-8-THC was used in a small study of children aged 3 to 13. This study found that the cannabinoid was well-tolerated and stopped chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in all 8 participants.

Both CBD and delta-8-THC do not cause a psychoactive “high”, and they have been given to children with no signs of intoxication. Some studies have shown that high doses of delta-8-THC have caused a mild euphoria, but the cannabinoid is significantly less powerful than the famous psychoactive, delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

Adolescent and teens

Photo credit
A cannabis high may last longer for teens than for adults. According to neuroscientist Dr. Francis Jensen, the teenage brain is more receptive to cannabis. This means that they get “higher” for longer. In the teen brain, Jensen explains in an interview with NPR’s Fresh Air, there are more places for THC to “land” and the cannabinoid stays in there longer. She says,

For instance, if they were to get high over a weekend, the effects may be still there on Thursday and Friday later that week. An adult wouldn’t have that same long-term effect.

Chronic adolescent and teen consumption may also make teens more likely to develop a long-term cannabis habit. Teens are more prone to impulsiveness and addictive behavior because they are rapidly soaking up and learning from their surroundings.

Teens can learn so quickly because their brains have more plasticity, which means that it can easily form new connections and learn new behaviors.

A 2015 survey of 8068 participants found that those who began consuming cannabis before the age of 14 were far more likely to be diagnosed with cannabis dependence than those who started after the age of 21.

However, it’s important to note that this survey did not rule out whether or not confounding factors such as underlying health conditions and home environment contributed to the link.

Adults

Photo credit
Could cannabis be a preventive supplement against old age? While the brain is constantly changing and learning, estimates suggest that the rational thinking (prefrontal cortex) part of the brain is not fully developed until the age of 25. After this point, the brain slowly tips the growing into the aging process. Cannabis is possibly most helpful for the brain after aging begins.

A 2007 rodent study published in the journal Neurobiology of Aging found that a synthetic THC successfully reduced brain inflammation and improved memory in rats with experimental Alzheimer’s Disease. This gave the research team at Ohio State University the idea that cannabis may be a successful preventative measure for degenerative aging.

In an interview with Leaf Science, Dr. Gary Wenk, a lead author of the study, explains,

I think all we can say safely so far is using low doses of marijuana for prolonged periods of time at some point in your life, possibly when you’re middle-aged to late middle-aged, is probably going to slow the onset or development of dementia, to the point where you’ll most likely die of old age before you get Alzheimer’s.

Senior

Photo credit
A study published in May of 2017 has been making headlines. Using rodents, an experiment has found evidence that cannabis compounds may slow down brain’s aging process. Researchers tested the effects of a THC isolate on young and old rodents. Mice were given a low dose of THC (3 mg/kg) for 28 consecutive days.

Three milligrams per kilogram of body weight is a low dose for a mouse. Mice are less sensitive to the psychoactive effects of THC than humans, so the are typically treated with larger amounts of THC per kilogram than a person would be.

In humans, a standard dose is 10 milligrams of THC. However, patients with serious medical conditions like Parkinson’s Disease or cancer are known to take upward of a gram of full extract cannabis oil every day. Unfortunately, there are no studies to test whether or not these dosages anti-aging effects in humans.

In the experiment, mice were separated into three different age groups, two, 12, and 18 months.

The researchers found that THC caused memory and learning decline in young mice. In adult mice, however, THC treatment successfully improved the cognitive function of older mice.

Older mice tend to have fewer cannabinoid receptors than young mice. A cannabinoid receptor is a location where THC connects in the body. The study found that chronic THC treatment not only boosted the expression of cannabinoid receptors in old mice, but it restored them to the same levels as young mice.

“The treatment completely reversed the loss of performance in the old animals,” Prof. Andreas Zimmer stated. Zimmer, of the Institute of Molecular Psychiatry at the University of Bon, is a co-author of the study.

The study also found that THC treatment in old mice inspired some genetic changes. Genetic analysis of the THC-treated mice revealed that the treatment seemed to “switch on” genes that promote plasticity and learning in aging mice. Genes associated with mental decline were switched off.

While the plant is most often associated with young people, there are some very good reasons why this herb will be an excellent partner in old age. The research on the topic thus far is only in its infancy. Yet, there is no doubt that cannabis just keeps getting better with age. So long as you start to consume it as an adult, anyway.
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
So, speaking of aging and menopause, I've been asked if I can come up with a canna-lube recipe. Whoopie Wassername has one, but it's around $90/bottle. If she can make one I can make one. It's just difficult for me to test... How can a male be a good gynecologist? Thats a philosophical Q, btw... Anyhoo, any thoughts on this recipe? How about the essential oils? Any comments, info, tips, tidbits and/or pointers happily read.


Weed Lube Recipe
1. In a Crockpot or MB Machine, combine:

2 Cups Unrefined Shea Butter or Cocoa Butter (both are edible, Cocoa Butter tastes better… also, these Cocoa Butter Wafers are much easier to work with and are cheaper for some reason…)
1/2 Cup Cannabis Infused Coconut Oil
1/2 Cup Sunflower or Grapeseed Oil (can also use Jojoba, but it’s not edible in large amounts)

2. If using a crockpot, keep it on warm/low for 1-2 hours, stirring occasionally.

2b. If using a Levo, set it to 180° button and the 2 Hr Butter button, and walk away.

3. Pour the oil into a large mixing bowl (or into a couple of smaller mixing bowls if you’d like to try using different essential oils). Add:

A few drops of Essential Oils per cup of lube: Jasmine, Sweet Orange, orYlang Ylang
4. When it begins to solidify, get out your beaters and whip the weed lube until it’s smooth and luscious (yes… fucking luscious).

5. Spoon your amazing homemade weed lube into shallow glass jars or 4 oz salve tins. Label and store in the fridge, out of reach of children and pets. Not intended for use with condoms as the oil can degrade the latex and cause condoms to break.

https://wakeandbake.co/i-dare-you-homemade-weed-lube/
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
So i made the recipe above and it's quite nice., especially if it was whipped during the cooling process. It's creamy, stays almost solid until it's touched, when it almost immediately turns to liquid.

And then i got the highdea that it looked like a chocolate recipe, and now I'm kinda wazzo'd. Used homemade vanilla and almond extracts, and organic maple syrup for sweetness.
Instead of 1 cup oil i substituted 3/4 cup of a thc:cbd blend, and added some freaky high thc (28ish%, if label is accurate). Poured that overtop a layer of graham cracker crumbs, a layer of nuts and maple flakes, and just now finished off a whole row. Thankfully i forgot to medicate the graham crackers...

It's almost naptime...
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
THE COMPLETE GUIDE TO MEDICAL MARIJUANA FOR SENIORS

Marijuana has had a turbulent history in the United States. Starting in the mid-1990s, however, there was a push to introduce the medical benefits of cannabis to the American people once again—”once again,” because before the 20th century, marijuana was almost entirely legal.

Beginning in the 1910s, states began to ban the sale of marijuana, eventually leading to a bill called the Marijuana Tax Act in 1937, which decreased the amount of hemp (a version of a cannabis plant) allowed to be produced in the U.S. Later on in the century, the stigma around marijuana grew and Richard Nixon signed into law the Controlled Substances Act, which included marijuana on a list of federally banned drugs alongside heroin, cocaine, and other narcotics.

By the time the 1990s came along, though, states began adopting the medical benefits of marijuana, starting with California. About 15 years after that, marijuana itself—not just the medicinal qualities—became legal for recreational use in Washington and Colorado. As of 2017, 29 of 50 states have legalized some form of medical marijuana. A 2013 study revealed that four of five doctors approve of medical marijuana and that more than 90 percent of medical marijuana patients (of around 7,500 surveyed) say that medical marijuana has helped treat their conditions. Seniors were the largest age group in the study (more than 2,300 respondents).

With medical marijuana gaining prevalence and popularity in the medical world all over the U.S., let’s look at exactly what it is.

What Is Medical Marijuana?


Medical marijuana is not the drug you can buy in the street, which may be improperly grown, infused with another drug, or not even authentic marijuana.

Medical marijuana stems from pure, uncut cannabis indica plant. Certain medically beneficial chemicals—the “mind-altering” ones that make you feel a buzz or high—are then taken from these planets and used to help treat patients for various medical issues. Sometimes the plants as a whole—and not just the certain chemicals inside it—are used to help with certain medical conditions.

While there are more than 100 chemicals (these are called cannabinoids) in marijuana, the two main chemicals in medical marijuana used for medical purposes are delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). These chemicals can help treat a slew of diseases and medical conditions, which we’ll discuss later.

How Can Medical Marijuana Help?


Medical marijuana has not been approved by the Federal Drug Administration yet, mainly because there have not been enough clinical trials done on a wide enough scale to prove the plant’s medical benefits. Just because a large government agency hasn’t approved medical marijuana as a proper medical treatment does not mean that the plant itself doesn’t have medical benefits, especially for seniors. Cannabis has actually been used as a medical treatment for thousands of years

Now that we know what medical marijuana is, we can look at the symptoms and illnesses the chemicals inside of the marijuana plants can help qualm or make easier to live with.

Cancer

One of the primary uses of medical marijuana is to help cancer patients, especially when they are going through rounds of chemotherapy. Some studies have shown that smoking marijuana can help with nausea and vomiting in chemotherapy patients. When dealing with palliative care, especially for patients with cancer, a study points out that most patients (more than 60 percent) experience both of these symptoms rather than one or the other, so medical marijuana can help relieve two symptoms (and potentially many more) at once. Studies have also shown smoked or vaporized marijuana can help with the pain suffered through neurological damage and can help patients get their eating habits back on schedule.

In terms of cancer treatment, there have only been two THC-infused oral pills that have been approved by the FDA for federal use: Marinol and Cesamet. These have been prescribed to help cancer patients with nausea.

Studies are ongoing in both animals and humans to see how medical marijuana can help treat tumors as well as the symptoms and illness that come with cancer.

Alzheimer’s Disease

Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease have sometimes turned to medical marijuana to help with their treatment to assist with symptoms of depression and loss of appetite that may come along with the degenerative brain disease, which affects more than four million Americans’ cognition and memory every year. About 10 percent of seniors have the disease.

In 2014, there was a preclinical study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease that analyzed the “potential therapeutic effects of THC” on the disease.” Researchers introduced THC to beta-amyloids, which are clumps of proteins that build up on the brain and are one of the leading signs of the presence of Alzheimer’s. They found that THC helped slow the advancement of these beta-amyloids, and the results from the study “strongly suggest that THC could be a potential therapeutic treatment option for Alzheimer’s disease through multiple functions and pathways.”

General Pain

Almost all seniors have experienced some sort of pain in their later years, and medical marijuana can help with that. What’s interesting is that you often don’t need to ingest the marijuana to reap the medical benefits of the plant. There are rubs, creams, and lotions infused with THC that can seep through your skin and attack a small, singular area of pain.

“There is increasing evidence that cannabis is helpful in the management of certain kinds of pain,” said Dr. Igor Grant, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego.

Medical marijuana, whether it’s smoked, consumed, or applied through a topical treatment, can help relieve acute and chronic pain by attacking the already-present cannabinoid receptors in our body. It helps relieve pain from:

  • Joint pain, like arthritis
  • Nerve damage
  • Chronic illness, like cancer
Despite taking up less than 15 percent of the population, seniors are prescribed more than one-third of all prescription drugs in America, and the drugs are often used to treat pain. Medical marijuana is a convenient and healthier alternative, and strays away from the addictive tendencies of opioids.

Anxiety/Mental Health Disorders

Studies have shown that cannabinol (CBD), one of the two main chemicals in marijuana used for medical purposes, can help treat anxiety and other mental health issues, including:

  • Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Panic attacks
  • Moderate depression
  • General anxiety
Essentially, these studies (conducted in animals, to this point) found that CBD helps stimulate serotonin receptors in the brain, which is the main goal of other anti-anxiety medications like Zoloft. Medical marijuana has been proven to be far less addictive and to actually help counteract addictions to other prescription drugs.

While using medical marijuana to treat anxiety may help for some, others have reported anxiety as a side effects of using it. As Harvard’s health department points out, about 20 to 30 percent of recreational users say smoking marijuana causes anxiety or panic attacks after smoking. It’s important to stay in touch with your doctor once trying medical marijuana as a treatment in case it has adverse effects as planned.

Included in mental health is addiction. Analysis on studies by the National Institute for Drug Abuse show that the presence of legal marijuana laws and marijuana dispensaries show a link between:

  • Fewer deaths caused by prescription opioids
  • Less treatment for opioid addiction
  • General prescribing of opioids
  • A reduced number of people self-reporting opioid misuse
Many of these links have been chalked up to doctors prescribing far less harmful medical marijuana than addictive painkillers and antidepressants.

Eating Disorders

Eating disorders are far more common among seniors than you think. Nearly 80 percent of deaths that occur due to anorexia occur among the elderly.

As seniors age, they may lose the desire to eat. This can happen because they’re making a personal decision about their body image or because of other psychological reasons beyond their control. Poor eating, amidst other issues like bone loss and heart problems, can prove chronic. But in any instance, medical marijuana may help seniors eat more and exit dangerous weight zones.

Studies have found that the body’s marijuana-like neurological system called the endocannabinoid system is underutilized or impaired amongst patients with anorexia and bulimia, essentially making the brain look at food as undesirable. Medical marijuana can help stimulate this system and help the brain treat food as a reward again.

Eating disorders are often treated with antidepressants and antipsychotics, but patients often report their symptoms worsening after taking them. Additionally, many national psychotic and eating disorder foundations and associations have yet to list medical marijuana as a treatment for eating disorders. However, many doctors view medical marijuana as a safer alternative view medical marijuana as a safer alternative to prescription drugs with far less risky side effects.

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is an issue with your eyes that occurs when a buildup of fluid damages the nerves in your eyeball. It is the leading cause of blindness for people over the age of 60. This disease causes increasing pressure in your eyes because of the amount of fluid, which affects your eyesight. For years, doctors have prescribed glaucoma eye drops that help relieve the pressure in your eyes, but it has also been proven that marijuana can help relieve pressure for hours at a time.

According to a website dedicated to Oregon eye doctors (where medical marijuana is legal), you need to relieve pressure in your eyes throughout the entire day to help combat glaucoma, which is why eye drops can sometimes be more effective. Other factors that play into using medical marijuana instead of glaucoma drops include cost effectiveness and personal preference.

How Can Medical Marijuana Boost The Brain?
We have looked at all the benefits medical marijuana can have when it comes to treating diseases, conditions, and mental illnesses, but it can also positively affect the brain functions in the elderly.

A study done at the University of Bonn in Germany looked at the how small doses of THC affected the brain cognition in mice that were young, mature, and elderly.As it often does in younger humans, THC inhibited the cognition in young mice slightly. But with the introduction of THC, the two older groups of mice performed better on cognitive tests than younger mice who were also introduced to THC. Before the introduction of THC, the older generations of mice performed significantly worse on the tests.

While this study is obviously not generalized for humans just yet, it is an intriguing building block when it comes to looking at medical marijuana helping increase the cognition in the elderly—something that often declines severely as people age. The next step is seeing how our internal cannabinoid system reacts to THC and how that introduction can help re-stimulate cognition, the study’s leading researcher, Andreas Zimmer, said.

“The idea is that as animals grow old, similar to in humans, the activity of the endogenous cannabinoid system goes down—and that coincides with signs of aging in the brain,” Zimmer said. “So we thought, ‘What if we stimulate the system by supplying [externally produced] cannabinoids?’”

Because cannabis is not considered a class A or dangerous drug in Germany, researchers are able to gain funding from the government to test the effect of THC on cognition in humans, which Zimmer plans on starting soon.

Why Seniors Are Turning To Medical Marijuana
The trend among seniors using medical marijuana is on the up-and-up. From 2006 to 2013, cannabis use among seniors increased by 250 percent.

We’ve discussed the many reasons why medical marijuana can be beneficial to seniors because of their health. But let’s take a look at a several more reasons why seniors are turning toward medical marijuana:

  • It’s safer and more cost efficient: As we’ve discussed in previous sections, medical marijuana is often a safer alternative to many prescription drugs like opioids and antipsychotics, and has with far fewer severe side effects. It can also be more cost efficient, too. A senior spends on average close to $3,000 per yearon prescription drugs alone. Contrast that with the national average of how much a person spends on medical marijuana per year—about $650—and you have a more cost-effective option, too.
  • Why not try it?: Some seniors have pain so severe that over-the-counter drugs and prescription medications can’t always cure their maladies. So sometimes they turn to medical marijuana out of desperation and find positive results. A woman named Reba Goodman reached this point of pain that was so severe, she stopped resisting marijuana. “It was just heaven,” she said of her pain relief, noting that she stopped using marijuana once the pain went away for good but that she could easily pick it up again if need be.
  • Helps with sleep: Some seniors have found medical marijuana to be a viable alternative for sleeping pills, which sometimes don’t work at all. Kerry Stiles, a 78-year-old nursing home resident who wears a pacemaker, says he places droplets of cannabis under tongue before he goes to bed, and he says it helps him sleep. The same goes for 95-year-old Alice, who experienced insomnia before turning to medical marijuana.
How Do You Consume Medical Marijuana?


There is not one specific way to intake the benefits of medical marijuana. Depending on your medical needs, budget, and your physical abilities, you may prefer one method over another. Let’s take a look at some ways you can consume medical marijuana.

  • Smoke it: Smoking marijuana provides some of the most instant relief when it comes to extracting the medical benefits from the plant. There are several ways to smoke marijuana, including through a smaller handheld pipe or device, a water bong (a pipe with a long neck), or a joint (where you use rolling papers). Smoking is typically the cheapest option, too, considering you only need to acquire a single smoking device or inexpensive rolling papers.
  • Consume it: Medical marijuana can be infused into foods and drinks to help ease the process of consumption. Essentially, the THC just needs to be extracted from the marijuana, then mixed in with whatever food or drink you want (commonly brownies, smoothies, cookies, etc.). Consuming marijuana usually takes longer to take effect, and even a small increase in dosage can have massive effects on how you feel once they kick in, so be careful with self-dosing. The edible and drinks business is becoming an increasingly popular option. Forbes reports that more $180 million worth of marijuana-infused foods and drinks were sold in California alone in 2016.
  • Vaporize it: Similar to smoking, vaporizing marijuana into a mist provides more instant results. For this method, you put a small amount of cannabis inside a machine called a “vaporizer,” which turns the heated cannabis into a vapor that isn’t as hot as smoke but still hot enough to extract the medical benefits. The devices used for vaporizing are usually far more expensive than ones for smoking, but the vapor is usually far less harsh on your lungs.
  • Rub it on your skin: Topical treatments like lotions and creams can help relieve maladies like muscle soreness and arthritis. Because they’re applied through the skin, topicals don’t give you the “high” often associated with cannabis. They also allow you to target one specific area of pain rather than inducing a full body effect for one localized area of pain.
  • Use droplets: Using droplets or sprays can help you control the dosage you’re taking. You place the treatment underneath your tongue, letting the saliva and tissues absorb the THC. While not as immediate as smoking or vaporizing, using sprays is more cost effective, especially if you need smaller doses.
  • Taken in pill form: It’s one of the least popular options, but there are suppositories and other cannabinoid medicines that are FDA-approved and help ease symptoms like nausea and vomiting.
Whatever method you choose to intake medical marijuana, it’s important you consult a medical professional about how much, when, and how often to use it.

Where Is Medical Marijuana Legal?


Though marijuana and its medical abilities are still banned and viewed as a Class A drug on a federal level, individual states have been given the right to legalize marijuana, both on a medical and recreational scale. While the Department of Justice announced under President Barack Obama’s administration that they were leaving the crackdown of the growth and sale of marijuana largely up to the states, there have been seizures and arrests made on dispensaries from the federal level.

As of October 2017, 29 out of 50 states have approved medical marijuana beyond the two FDA-approved cannabis drugs, Marinol and Cesamet. These states include (ones in bold also allow it recreationally):

  • Alaska
  • Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Colorado
  • Connecticut
  • Delaware
  • Florida
  • Hawaii
  • Illinois
  • Maine
  • Maryland
  • Massachusetts
  • Michigan
  • Minnesota
  • Montana
  • Nevada
  • New Hampshire
  • New Jersey
  • New Mexico
  • New York
  • North Dakota
  • Ohio
  • Oregon
  • Pennsylvania
  • Rhode Island
  • Vermont
  • Washington
  • West Virginia
Washington, D.C. has also approved medical marijuana.

States have varying laws for how much you are allowed to possess on your person at one time, how much you are allowed to personally grow, and what conditions are recognized as being helped by medical marijuana. To find out more information on your state’s laws on medical marijuana, visit the National Conference of State Legislatures website.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
New study shows seniors embracing medical marijuana

The Washington, D.C.-based National Council for Aging Care recently released its complete guide to medical marijuana for seniors, advising those in their golden years on the benefits of alternative medication.

The report recaps a brief history, including marijuana’s legal use before the 20th century, followed by state bans of marijuana and hemp that began around 1910. Perhaps the peak of the stigma surrounding the medicinal plant occurred under President Nixon, who signed the Controlled Substances Act, which placed marijuana alongside heroin and cocaine as a Schedule I illegal substance.

Because of its Schedule I status, U.S. research institutions are not able to conduct clinical trials on the medical benefits of cannabis. As such, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration cannot approve cannabis for medicinal use. The only drug derived from natural cannabis that is FDA-approved is Epidiolex, a CBD-based seizure medication from British pharmaceutical company GW Pharmaceuticals.

The council’s report then details the early days of medical marijuana use in the U.S., which began almost 20 years ago starting with cannabis legalization in California. The focus of the report is to advise seniors on medical-grade marijuana, outlining the benefits of the more than 100 cannabinoids, particularly THC and CBD for treating a whole range of medical issues.

Medical marijuana is legal in thirty states, including the District of Columbia. A recent report by New Frontier Data expects that number to rise within the next few years.

The report quotes a Washington Post survey, where, of 7,500 patients questioned, more than 90 percent reported that medical marijuana helped their conditions; more than 2,300 of the respondents were seniors, by far the study’s largest group. In fact, from 2006 to 2013, senior cannabis use rose by 250 percent.

Seniors view cannabis as much more cost effective and safer than many prescription drugs, particularly when compared to opioids for pain. Although they comprise less than 15 percent of the population, seniors take more than 33 percent of all prescription medications. With the average senior spending $3,000 on prescriptions each year, it’s no wonder they are turning to the much cheaper $650-per-year medical marijuana alternative.

Nationwide polls indicate that the number one ailment for which people use medical marijuana is pain, and since nearly all seniors will experience pain in their later years, they feel they have nothing to lose. Since cannabis no longer has to be smoked to reap the benefits, seniors are embracing topical, edibles and other forms of cannabis ingestion. Indeed, there is an increasing body of evidence showing that cannabinoids from the plant are effective for arthritic pain, nerve damage, and pain from cancer.

The report details further promising studies that show medical marijuana’s usefulness in sleep disorders and insomnia, cancer, glaucoma, Alzheimer’s disease, anxiety, eating disorders and mental health disorders like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

In one detailed example, the report outlined marijuana’s use as an appetite stimulant in eating disorders, which greatly affect the elderly. Nearly 80 percent of anorexia-induced deaths each year occur among the elderly, who simply lose the desire to eat. The alternative treatment to eating disorders is typically harsh medications like antidepressants or even antipsychotic medications. Many patients and their doctors view medical cannabis as a far better alternative treatment.

The report strives to give evidence of the latest research studies and presents the pros and cons of medical cannabis use. While many people use medical marijuana for anxiety, some users (about 20 to 30 percent) say that its use makes them more anxious.

One of the most significant issues in the elderly population is cognitive decline, and the report details how even small amounts of THC can boost brain function in animals studied.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
One of the most significant issues in the elderly population is cognitive decline, and the report details how even small amounts of THC can boost brain function in animals studied.
Yes, perhaps...but one should be careful with seniors with cognitive issues which often are accompanied by increased levels of anxiety which can be acerbated by cannabis.
 

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
Yes, perhaps...but one should be careful with seniors with cognitive issues which often are accompanied by increased levels of anxiety which can be exacerbated by cannabis.
This is definitely a scenario where one should be careful with the types and doses of cannabis medicines. As somebody who has some similar cognitive disabilities, I find that some varieties have a chemotype that is very racey and anxiety-provoking even with a very small dose. On the other hand, there are some varieties with very relaxing chemotypes that do not seem to provoke anxiety even in the most anxiety-prone of patients like myself (unsurprisingly, these are the ones I prefer lol).

Generally speaking, IME, too much of any THC containing cannabis, regardless of the rest of the chemical profile seems to provoke anxiety/panic. This is a distinct apparent cause from the abovementioned terp profiles which seem to lead to anxiety regardless of dose. This should be kept in mind for new patients to cannabis who have symptoms like anxiety, because a very small dose could be too much for somebody with no tolerance.

Edibles also seem to provoke anxiety more easily than inhalables. The method of consumption of MMJ appears to have a very strong relationship to these kinds of potentially negative side effects. I would generally not recommend that people who have problems with anxiety use edibles, unless the doses are very controlled and their tolerance is sufficiently high so as not to get too much of that delta-11-thc into them.

CBD should be considered for persons with cognitive disabilities where anxiety is significant. It can mitigate the anxiety-provoking properties of too much THC and will allow those who are very sensitive to other cannabis chemical profiles to benefit from those that they are sensitive to in this way. CBD is also neuroprotective and neurogenerative. It has been demonstrated to lead to the growth of new nerve tissues in key areas of the brain (especially the hippocampus) where such nerves are damaged by the long term experience of symptoms like anxiety.
 
Last edited:

asdf420

Member
i've been vaping my CBD isolate, but now i'm considering making edibles or capsules of it with sunflower lecithin, but that's kind of a chore. And it seems like CBD made into a nanoemulsion would be a lot more bioavailable.
 
Last edited:

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
STUDY INDICATES MEDICINAL CANNABIS IMPROVES LIVES OF DEMENTIA PATIENTS

A study published in the Journal of Medicinal Cannabis and Cannabinoids indicates that medicinal cannabis may greatly improved behaviour problems and daily care in severely demented patients.

Around 5 out of 6 patients with dementia develop behavioural and psychological symptoms, which can greatly impact quality of life for the patients and their carers. Psychotropic medications are often used to treat these symptoms, but the majority of patients see little effect and experience negative side effects.

This study, conducted in Geneva, Switzerland, included ten patients with dementia experiencing severe behavioural problems. They were treated with three THC/CBD formulations, with increasing levels of THC.

Over the span of two months, behavioural indications decreased by 40%, and rigidity by 50%. Half of the patients decreased or stopped other psychotropic medications. Not only did this improve the quality of life of the patients, but staff at the aged care centre indicated these results made daily care and transfers easier, improved direct contact, improved behaviour, and decreased side effects of opioids such as constipation.

While this was a small study, it indicates that results of larger studies, such as MGC Pharma and UNDA’s Phase IIb currently ongoing, may show significant results.
 

Sponsored by

PuffItUp VapeFully Dynavap Vaposhop
Top