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Meds Cannabis preparations for use in ecig tanks

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
A lot of people are interested in ecig style cannabis vaporizers as a cheap, solution that can provide many rips without reloading/cleaning anything. As many of you know, there are a number of safety concerns that have emerged over time that relate to these.

I thought it would be worth offering my thoughts on these products.

It is important to start by discussing the kinds of cannabis products that we will typically find in an ecig tank, they are as follows:

1. Distilled cannabis extracts: A cannabis resin 'distillate' is literally cannabis that has been boiled and recondensed. This process can provide us with a product that is nothing but cannabis resin, but still runny and lacking the viscosity that would usually prevent us from putting a straight concentrate into an ecig style tank.

2. Cannabis tinctures: These can be made using a large variety of methods. What all of these tinctures have in common, is that they contain more than just cannabis resin. A cannabis tincture made for ecig use will consist of cannabis resin dissolved in a given solvent or mixture of solvents. The most common solvents are Polyethylene Glycol, Propylene Glycol, Vegetable Glycerine, Ethanol, and even terps (either derived from cannabis, or other plants - these may be 'whole plant' terpene profiles, or single individual terps).

As we see at item #2: Anything in an ecig tank that consists of resin emulsified in added solvents (or even additional terpenes not originally in the resin for use as a solvent) is best described as a tincture. It may or may not be more concentrated with cannabis actives than the flower that it came from, so we do not necessarily consider it the same way as a concentrate.

Many of you know that I use concentrates only, and swear by them as being healthier and more medically effective for my needs than flower. What I use is cannabis resin that has not had anything added to or removed from it, which I vaporize on an e-nail or in a traditional vape.

On the other hand, I do not use and do not trust ecig style pens with cannabis tinctures (or even straight distillates generally, which can be strictly referred to as concentrates) in them. Remember, many cannabis distillates described at #1 above (those without any solvent added) that end up in these ecig tanks are regularly busted with high levels of pesticides etc. These distillates haven't even had solvents added to them (which we know are unsafe for different reasons).

Ecig preparations that comprise nothing but a cannabis concentrate and added terpenes are a challenge at the moment. The problem is not so much that people may use 'food derived terps'. If non cannabis terps are isolated sufficiently, they are the very same isoprene derived molecules that we find in cannabis and cannot be distinguished from the 'real deal'.

One problem can arise when non cannabis terps are not sufficiently isolated and so other molecules from the original food product are present (some of these may not be safe to inhale). Another problem is when even perfectly isolated terps from cannabis or anything else are added in unsafe individual levels (ie: too much of a single terpene) or unsafe overall levels (too many terps as a total % of the entire product).

Be on the lookout for unusually high spikes of a given terp. A lot of individual terps commonly found in cannabis can cause harmful side effects in higher concentrations.

From an extractors point of view, I've said it many times:

If you want to take some awful material that no scrupulous retailer would sell (and nobody in their right mind would buy) and turn it into something that looks like relatively clean resin, distill it. Many less than prudent manufacturers have already figured this out and in most markets, regulation has not caught up. Buyer beware is the order of the day.

My advice is as always - don't buy products that are sold in ecig tanks if there is ANY other option.

Even if there is no other option, NEVER BUY ANYTHING IN AN ECIG TANK IF THERE ARE NO TEST RESULTS for pesticides, microbials, residual solvents, terps (this is important for some of the considerations mentioned above) etc. Also as above, never buy anything with PG/VG/PEG/ethanol - all of these are unsafe to heat and inhale.

I hope that this is helpful for you all. :peace:
 
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momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Really a nice, thorough post @herbivore21. Thank you!

There are so many of the preloaded cartridges available on the market right now (here is the U.S.) and the 'ease of use' makes them really appealing. But I've often wondered what they are 'cut' with to make them flow. And what product is used to start with. Too many variables that can be negative for my liking.
 

Vicki

Herbal Alchemist
Really a nice, thorough post @herbivore21. Thank you!

There are so many of the preloaded cartridges available on the market right now (here is the U.S.) and the 'ease of use' makes them really appealing. But I've often wondered what they are 'cut' with to make them flow. And what product is used to start with. Too many variables that can be negative for my liking.
The only thing I have available legally to vape here are prefilled cartridges cut with coconut oil!
 

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
The only thing I have available legally to vape here are prefilled cartridges cut with coconut oil!
Holy shit! Like the other ejuice solvents, definitely do not vape coconut oil! You may have known this already though :)
 

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
Apparently, smoking flowers is bad, and outlawed, but vaping coconut oil is fine, and totally legal. ::rolls eyes::
It really is some kind of crazy isn't it! So much regulation is done so stupidly in various MMJ jurisdictions. I do not believe smoking flowers should be allowed under medical (of course recreationally is no problem) as combustion byproducts are just inexcusable in a medical context. Still, as you rightly point out, if we're not going to allow smoking due to risks to health, maybe we might want to look at not allowing other dangerous practices too - at least for the sake of due diligence?
 

DieHard

Active Member
Company Rep
My go to recently for absolute stealth is an ecig mod with Xtractology prefilled tanks. They have travelled the friendly skies with me several times. These are filled with thc distillate which is thinned with terps which are also added to approach specific strain flavor profiles. This distillate is also available in syringes so you can fill you own tanks. I also will occasionally dab this material as well.
 

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
My go to recently for absolute stealth is an ecig mod with Xtractology prefilled tanks. They have travelled the friendly skies with me several times. These are filled with thc distillate which is thinned with terps which are also added to approach specific strain flavor profiles. This distillate is also available in syringes so you can fill you own tanks. I also will occasionally dab this material as well.
Xtractology's product you mention is one I have heard about before, and strikes me as reasonably safe :biggrin: I believe their products are available with the requisite test results that I recommend above to make sure too :science:
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
I saw this article today and thought it might pertain here. :smile:

New Study Reveals the Safest Marijuana Oil Agents for Vaporizing

A new study by the Medical Marijuana Research Institute tested marijuana oil thinning agents, which are mixed together in the production of vaporizer cartridges used for vaporizing marijuana oil.

Vaporization creates an inhalable aerosol by heating marijuana to a temperature at which the plant’s chemical compounds boil. Because the marijuana is not heated to the point of combustion, fewer carcinogens and irritants are produced. Compared with smoking, vaporization is associated with fewer respiratory issues in marijuana users, which some researchers suggest is a result of lower exposure to toxic substances.

Published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, the study analyzed four marijuana oil thinning agents – propylene glycol [PG], vegetable glycerin [VG], polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400], and medium chain triglycerides [MCT] – which were all heated to 230 degrees Celsius, the maximum temperature at which the plant’s chemical compounds vaporize but do not combust. The resulting vapors were then tested for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein.


The Institute stated: “Formaldehyde production from PEG 400 isolate was particularly high, with one inhalation accounting for 1.12 percent of the daily exposure limit, nearly the same exposure as smoking one cigarette. Because PG and PEG 400 are often mixed with cannabis oil, individuals who vaporize cannabis oil products may risk exposure to harmful formaldehyde levels.”


A large discrepancy was found between the two types of thinning agents: the natural agents (MCT and VG) and the petroleum-based agents (PEG 400 and PG). The study concluded that medium chain triglycerides (MCT) and vegetable glycerin (VG) are by far among the safest thinning agents available to individuals who vape marijuana oil.
 

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
I saw this article today and thought it might pertain here. :smile:

New Study Reveals the Safest Marijuana Oil Agents for Vaporizing

A new study by the Medical Marijuana Research Institute tested marijuana oil thinning agents, which are mixed together in the production of vaporizer cartridges used for vaporizing marijuana oil.

Vaporization creates an inhalable aerosol by heating marijuana to a temperature at which the plant’s chemical compounds boil. Because the marijuana is not heated to the point of combustion, fewer carcinogens and irritants are produced. Compared with smoking, vaporization is associated with fewer respiratory issues in marijuana users, which some researchers suggest is a result of lower exposure to toxic substances.

Published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, the study analyzed four marijuana oil thinning agents – propylene glycol [PG], vegetable glycerin [VG], polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400], and medium chain triglycerides [MCT] – which were all heated to 230 degrees Celsius, the maximum temperature at which the plant’s chemical compounds vaporize but do not combust. The resulting vapors were then tested for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein.


The Institute stated: “Formaldehyde production from PEG 400 isolate was particularly high, with one inhalation accounting for 1.12 percent of the daily exposure limit, nearly the same exposure as smoking one cigarette. Because PG and PEG 400 are often mixed with cannabis oil, individuals who vaporize cannabis oil products may risk exposure to harmful formaldehyde levels.”


A large discrepancy was found between the two types of thinning agents: the natural agents (MCT and VG) and the petroleum-based agents (PEG 400 and PG). The study concluded that medium chain triglycerides (MCT) and vegetable glycerin (VG) are by far among the safest thinning agents available to individuals who vape marijuana oil.
This is fascinating! Thanks for sharing Mom! I'd not yet seen a comparison of emissions of a toxic byproduct between different ejuice solvents like this.

While this study lets us know of formaledhyde levels from these various carriers, we need to keep in mind that formaldehyde is not the only dangerous compound that comes off of these compounds. For example, MCT we would expect more problems with heating and inhaling so much lipid material. VG we would be more concerned with glycidol which is reliably produced by heating VG in an ecig cart (and is regarded by regulators and researchers to be a probable carcinogen).
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Thanks to @Killick for steering me towards this article.....

Research Study Tests Thinning Agents Used In Vaporizable #Cannabisoil To Determine If Any Produce Harmful Compounds

Study Finds that Two of the Four Thinning Agents That Were Tested Produce Elevated levels of Formaldehyde When Heated to 230⁰C


ARIZONA - May 16, 2017 (Investorideas.com Newswire) A newly-released study by the Medical Marijuana Research Institute, which tested cannabis oil thinning agents, revealed that medium chain triglycerides (MCT) are among the safest thinning agents available to individuals who vape cannabis.

Published in The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine, the study analyzed four cannabis oil thinning agents – propylene glycol [PG], vegetable glycerin [VG], polyethylene glycol 400 [PEG 400], and medium chain triglycerides [MCT] – which were all heated to 230 degrees Celsius, the maximum temperature at which the plant's chemical compounds vaporize but do not combust. The resulting vapors were then tested for formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein.

Conducted by Matthew D. DiDonato, Ph.D. and William D. Troutt, NMD, who co-founded the Medical Marijuana Research Institute and who have more than 15 years of cumulative research experience, the study revealed a large discrepancy between the two types of thinning agents – the natural agents (such as MCT and VG) and the petroleum-based agents (such as PEG 400 and PG).

The study revealed that: "Formaldehyde production from PEG 400 isolate was particularly high, with one inhalation accounting for 1.12 percent of the daily exposure limit, nearly the same exposure as smoking one cigarette. Because PG and PEG 400 are often mixed with cannabis oil, individuals who vaporize cannabis oil products may risk exposure to harmful formaldehyde levels."

The Medical Marijuana Research Institute is the research arm of Harvest, Inc., a Tempe, Ariz.-based cultivator, producer and distributor of medical cannabis products, including Dream Steam, a vaporizable cannabis oil product that utilizes MCT.

"As the use of medical marijuana grows, so too does the demand for safe methods of consumption," said Steve White, CEO of Harvest, Inc. "Even though Arizona doesn't mandate that cannabis be tested, or enforce any kind of safety standard for cannabis, we have strict quality-control measures in place to ensure that we're producing the safest, highest-quality products. We feel it's our responsibility to not only conduct our own internal testing, but also to have our products independently inspected on a regular basis. As a leader in the medical marijuana industry, it's important for us to test all cannabis products so that we are producing the safest ones in the market. This recent study validated that thinning cannabis oil with MCT is a safer alternative to a petroleum-based additive that produces harmful levels of formaldehyde when heated for vaporizing."

Cannabis use in the United States has more than doubled between 2002 and 2013, and is expected to continue its growth trajectory. While 86 percent of medical cannabis consumption takes place through smoking, a concern about negative respiratory and health effects have increased interest in cannabis vaporization as a potentially safer alternative to smoking cannabis.

Vaporization creates an inhalable aerosol by heating cannabis to a temperature at which the plant's chemical compounds boil. Because the cannabis is not heated to the point of combustion, fewer carcinogens and irritants are produced. Compared with smoking, vaporization is associated with fewer respiratory issues in cannabis users, which some researchers suggest is a result of lower exposure to toxic substances.

"We're in the business of helping people battle painful medical conditions and debilitating diseases; we're not in the business of adding to or creating any health issues," said White. "It's one of the reasons we feel so strongly that the potential health effects of petroleum-based thinning agents need to be front and center when it comes to regulating cannabis."

The article goes on to talk about Harvest, Inc. The
company currently has dispensary, cultivation, and production licenses in Arizona, Illinois, Maryland, and Nevada, and plans to expand its reach into more states across the country. If you are interested in reading further, click the link in the title.

 

NorVape

New Member
Interesting!

I've made a couple of solutions like this in the past my self, to have access to medicine in situations where this is the only solution.

Also I often vape a little nicotine in the night time, whit good equipment. I actually really enjoy the synergy between canna and nicotine, as long as the canna doses is far larger than the nic doses. Faaar larger haha.

What I've noticed is: I can't stand PG or PEG. I mean, physically - it makes my throat hurt. Unfortunately, these are the only dillutants that I know of that one could easily use for DIY. I've bought some terps, but haven't had the time to read up properly yet.

VG is clearly less healthy than vaping herbs, oils or hash, and I cannot understand how people can chain vape this stuff. Well, I mean, compared to a cigarette habit, this is healthy, so I guess it makes some sense then. Just as these canna cartridges would be a step up for some of my spliff chain smoking friends.

When VG is used in moderation, I feel no side effects, and my doctor can not see any ill effects from it when we run tests (I have asthma). I treat it like smoking a pipe in the night time, not a substitute for chain smoking cigarettes, which probably helps.

Actually I find the use of MCT interesting, as I've read reports on this omitting the lipid problem, but I fear it is used by people who do not understand it properly, and I know for sure that I have no business using it as a layman.

So - what is the safest way to create ones own e juice blend with cannabis?

A shame that it's easier to make portable changa than canna etc, because a medicated ecig that actually worked properly would be of great assistance to a lot of my friends, and yes, even though it's not a safe as a proper vape, deffo safer than hashish mixed with Lucky Strikes in a XL skin :smoke:
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Some of us have discussed the additives used in making these disposable pre-filled vape cartridges. I thought this was a good summary of what's available out there right now and what to watch for.

Everything You Need to Know About Pre-Filled Oil Vape Cartridges

When it comes to ease of use, portability, and functionality, one cannabis product stands tall above the rest. You may know them as pre-loaded cannabis oil vape cartridges, hash oil vape pens, or even disposable wax pens. These relatively new and exciting devices have permeated the cannabis concentrate market over the last several years, quickly becoming the go-to concentrate-based product for both the novice and accustomed cannabis fans.

However, when it comes to choosing the right pre-loaded disposable pen, various factors stand in the way of making a decision. Although many of these products seem aesthetically similar at first glance, there are a myriad of nuances that distinguish them from one another.

Understanding the differences between these disposable pens can help you make an educated decision on which product is right for your consumption.

Why Choose a Pre-Filled Oil Vape Cartridge?
If you’re new to pre-filled oil vape cartridges, there are many benefits to using them that I’ve outlined below.

Ease of Use
Deciding to use a pre-filled cannabis oil vape cartridge takes the guesswork completely out of the equation. Contrary to other methods of using hash oil such as a dab rig and nail setup, or even manual portable vape pens which require self-loading, pre-filled “carts” require little to no effort whatsoever. At most, these products may require you to press a button to inhale. In fact, most of the time you don’t even have to worry about the battery life—many products are designed so that charging the battery isn’t even necessary.

Portability
Pre-filled oil vape carts are the easiest method of enjoying hash oil while on the go. Their sleek and minimalist design allows for discreet vaping, free of the distracting qualities that larger setups or raw cannabis products may carry (such as noticeable smoke or odor).

Dosing
For uninitiated cannabis concentrate users, dosing can be a major concern. Nobody wants an overwhelming experience when attempting to enjoy cannabis oil products responsibly. Unlike dabbing, using a pre-loaded vape pen allows for a highly controlled dose with each inhalation. This gives the user full autonomy of how much or little to consume.

The Types of Pre-Filled Cartridges Available
Familiarize yourself with the many types of pre-filled oil vape cartridges on the market so you can purchase the one that best fits your needs or preferences.

Cartridge/Battery Combos vs. Disposables
When choosing a pre-filled vape pen, there are several hardware options. Some products are offered in tanks that typically come formatted with a 510 threaded standard vaporizer battery insert. These tanks can fit on any battery that contains the 510 threading, and nowadays almost all battery tanks come in this format. The exception to this is when you purchase pre-loaded tanks designed by companies to fit their personalized batteries. An example would be the PAX Era Pods, which are designed to be used with their vaporizer/battery systems.

Distillate Cartridges vs. CO2
Hash oil tends to be a highly viscous substance, making it substantially difficult to use with standard vaporizer hardware. This has led the pre-loaded vaporizer market in a series of directions to design a product that functions properly with standard atomizers.

Methods have been taken to “cut” or infuse standard hash oil with various substances such as polyethylene glycol (PEG), propylene glycol (PG), vegetable glycerin (VG), or even medium chain triglycerides (MCT) such as coconut oil in order to maintain a less viscous and lasting consistency conducive to standard atomizer functionality.

While the use of such agents has been subject to controversy, market innovators have found several ways to mitigate this concern by developing alternative extraction techniques. An example of this is the use of distillates in pre-loaded vape pens.

Distillation takes the standard CO2 extraction process used in most disposable pen varieties and refines the oil once more through a fractioning process to produce a substance with a much higher cannabinoid purity. Distillate, being less viscous, is much easier to use in pre-loaded vape pens and does not require cutting agents.

There are several ways to use terpenes with pre-filled vaporizer cartridges. Food-grade terpene flavorings, for example, are arguably the most prevalent as well as the lowest quality when it comes to flavor and experience. Terpenes are found all over nature, and can also be synthesized in a lab.

Take d-limonene for example, a popular terpene additive that is found in some cannabis varietals. Many manufacturers use food-grade d-limonene as the sole flavoring additive for their pre-loaded cartridges. Although this helps to cut the viscosity of the oil as well as offer a mild flavor enhancement, infusions such as this tend to be one-dimensional and offer little to nothing in enhancing experience to the user.

When shopping for cartridges, oftentimes these types of pens will be labeled as “lemon/lime”-flavored to represent this additive being used. Many other food-grade terpenes are used in this respect, which is why it’s important to check with your budtender and read labels carefully when buying terpene-infused cartridges.

Products Labeled by Effect
Many times, pre-filled oil vape cartridges are labeled and marketed by their supposed effect on the user. Products of this variety tend to claim they provide “relaxing” or “energetic” effects, with some often being labeled as indica, sativa, or even hybrid. When infused into a product, these terpene combinations are designed to give effects similar to what you would find in particular cannabis strains.

Whether they’re infused with food-grade terpenes or naturally-derived terpenes extracted from cannabis strains, many of these products incorporate carefully mixed combinations similar to what would be traced in a strain or strain type. How well these infusions imitate the strain varieties they mimic is debatable; however, products with terpene combinations tend to give a more enhanced experience than a similar product containing one or no terpenes.

Cannabinoid-Specific Cartridges
Although many hash oil pen varieties are labeled by flavor or effect, some focus on cannabinoid concentration. Aside from the typical high-THC product that most pens offer, there are some manufacturers that offer products containing elevated levels of cannabidiol (CBD).

High-CBD pens may or may not contain added flavorings, but they do guarantee a ratio of THC to CBD that can range from 2:1 all the way to 20:1 and greater. These types of pens offer great medicinal value to those looking for CBD in an easy-to-consume product.

Full-Spectrum Cartridges
The pinnacle of pre-loaded oil cartridges in terms of overall quality rests with full-spectrum extracts. These products are created using the entire spectrum of bioavailable molecules found within a given cannabis strain. A full-spectrum oil does not add, reintroduce, or remove any active compound within a strain and offers a flavor and effect far superior and multidimensional to most competitors.

Pre-filled full-spectrum cartridges are hard to come by and are only offered in certain markets; their price tends to reflect their rarity as well. If you’re fortunate enough to live in a market where these products are available, it’s highly recommended to fork up the extra cash to give one a shot. In terms of strain comparability, the flavor on a full-spectrum cart is incredibly similar to what you would experience in a strain.

All in all, there are many types of pre-filled oil cartridge varieties to consider, each one with its pros and cons. If you’re interested in learning more about these types of products, alway ask your local budtender before committing to a purchase. Oftentimes labels only offer a fraction of the information compared to the knowledge and expertise of a cannabis professional such as a budtender. Regardless of your taste, there’s bound to be a hash oil cartridge option available to suit your individual needs.
 

DieHard

Active Member
Company Rep
That is excellent info Mom. One thing to remember is to not be afraid to ask: what's in it? Is there a carrier liquid (PG, VG, some terpenes). If terpenes, what are they sourced from?
 

2clicker

we out there
great thread by a great dude (IM me for my paypal :wave:)!!!

i used to make and vape liquid concentrates and while they can be stealthy... they are always a disappointment for me. always have to keep puffing. flavor always disappears well before the tank is empty. tanks still leak IME. so i gave up on it. load as you go is the way to go IMO. always tastes fresh, will medicate you quickly/stealthily, and never leaks.

i didnt come into a thread to only take shots at the topic at hand. i just never had the experience i was looking for with liquids. devils advocate if you will...? lol sorry @herbivore21!

this forum needs a DIY concentrate coil/atty build thread. ill get one going when i get a chance to sit down at my computer.
 

herbivore21

Well-Known Member
great thread by a great dude (IM me for my paypal :wave:)!!!

i used to make and vape liquid concentrates and while they can be stealthy... they are always a disappointment for me. always have to keep puffing. flavor always disappears well before the tank is empty. tanks still leak IME. so i gave up on it. load as you go is the way to go IMO. always tastes fresh, will medicate you quickly/stealthily, and never leaks.

i didnt come into a thread to only take shots at the topic at hand. i just never had the experience i was looking for with liquids. devils advocate if you will...? lol sorry @herbivore21!

this forum needs a DIY concentrate coil/atty build thread. ill get one going when i get a chance to sit down at my computer.
Yes please, my old friend! I look forward to seeing this thread! :biggrin: My thanks for the kind words (what was that paypal again?) and I should add that it is wonderful to see you back! :peace:
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
A lot of people are interested in ecig style cannabis vaporizers as a cheap, solution that can provide many rips without reloading/cleaning anything. As many of you know, there are a number of safety concerns that have emerged over time that relate to these.

I thought it would be worth offering my thoughts on these products.

It is important to start by discussing the kinds of cannabis products that we will typically find in an ecig tank, they are as follows:

1. Distilled cannabis extracts: A cannabis resin 'distillate' is literally cannabis that has been boiled and recondensed. This process can provide us with a product that is nothing but cannabis resin, but still runny and lacking the viscosity that would usually prevent us from putting a straight concentrate into an ecig style tank.

2. Cannabis tinctures: These can be made using a large variety of methods. What all of these tinctures have in common, is that they contain more than just cannabis resin. A cannabis tincture made for ecig use will consist of cannabis resin dissolved in a given solvent or mixture of solvents. The most common solvents are Polyethylene Glycol, Propylene Glycol, Vegetable Glycerine, Ethanol, and even terps (either derived from cannabis, or other plants - these may be 'whole plant' terpene profiles, or single individual terps).

As we see at item #2: Anything in an ecig tank that consists of resin emulsified in added solvents (or even additional terpenes not originally in the resin for use as a solvent) is best described as a tincture. It may or may not be more concentrated with cannabis actives than the flower that it came from, so we do not necessarily consider it the same way as a concentrate.

Many of you know that I use concentrates only, and swear by them as being healthier and more medically effective for my needs than flower. What I use is cannabis resin that has not had anything added to or removed from it, which I vaporize on an e-nail or in a traditional vape.

On the other hand, I do not use and do not trust ecig style pens with cannabis tinctures (or even straight distillates generally, which can be strictly referred to as concentrates) in them. Remember, many cannabis distillates described at #1 above (those without any solvent added) that end up in these ecig tanks are regularly busted with high levels of pesticides etc. These distillates haven't even had solvents added to them (which we know are unsafe for different reasons).

Ecig preparations that comprise nothing but a cannabis concentrate and added terpenes are a challenge at the moment. The problem is not so much that people may use 'food derived terps'. If non cannabis terps are isolated sufficiently, they are the very same isoprene derived molecules that we find in cannabis and cannot be distinguished from the 'real deal'.

One problem can arise when non cannabis terps are not sufficiently isolated and so other molecules from the original food product are present (some of these may not be safe to inhale). Another problem is when even perfectly isolated terps from cannabis or anything else are added in unsafe individual levels (ie: too much of a single terpene) or unsafe overall levels (too many terps as a total % of the entire product).

Be on the lookout for unusually high spikes of a given terp. A lot of individual terps commonly found in cannabis can cause harmful side effects in higher concentrations.

From an extractors point of view, I've said it many times:

If you want to take some awful material that no scrupulous retailer would sell (and nobody in their right mind would buy) and turn it into something that looks like relatively clean resin, distill it. Many less than prudent manufacturers have already figured this out and in most markets, regulation has not caught up. Buyer beware is the order of the day.

My advice is as always - don't buy products that are sold in ecig tanks if there is ANY other option.

Even if there is no other option, NEVER BUY ANYTHING IN AN ECIG TANK IF THERE ARE NO TEST RESULTS for pesticides, microbials, residual solvents, terps (this is important for some of the considerations mentioned above) etc. Also as above, never buy anything with PG/VG/PEG/ethanol - all of these are unsafe to heat and inhale.

I hope that this is helpful for you all. :peace:
Very well said!

Here's my take on the subject:

I love wax (consecrate) to the MAX.

What I do is use a MOD 100W, 200W and some pens!

30 watts with a ATOMIZER (GOON, KENNEDY 24 - 25 mm) whatever your MOD can handle?

My mix is:

EJUICE = 3grams use a flavor you like. (CUTTWOOD brand's UNICORN MILK) whatever?
KIEF = 2 grams I warm the e juice for 10 seconds in my MIRCO-WAVE before adding the KIEF!
COIL'S x 2 Tiger or Tank (whatever)?
24 - 26 gauge wire (stainless is what I use)! Wrap 32
I coat my coil's in {ROSIN, SHATTER, CRUMBLE} size of long grain rice
ORGANIC COTTON for wicking.
e-juice keep's the coil's cool!
It may be weird?

I do flowers in a VAPORIZER through out the day! (every 2 hour's more or less)

420 is the most important time of day!

CANNABIS helps me read fast!



This is part of my program? (right, wrong or indifferent)
Help's my stress!
 
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Disrupt

Well-Known Member
EJUICE = 3grams use a flavor you like. (CUTTWOOD brand's UNICORN MILK) whatever?
KIEF = 2 grams I warm the e juice for 10 seconds in my MIRCO-WAVE before adding the KIEF!
So, you don't actually need concentrate to dissolve in a liquid? How the kief doesn't hopelessly gunk up your coils, I can't imagine. Also, you may as well use 100% VG e-juice. It may not be safe, but if you like e-juice, it's probably the carrier of lowest concern, especially with TC.

My personal favorite brand is Kind Juice. It's a little more expensive, but they use natural flavors in 100% VG, and it tastes great - not like candy or soda pop. Keep in mind that natural flavors are not necessarily safer. KJ's naturally extracted tobacco flavors are a real pleasure to vape, the best I've tasted.
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
So, you don't actually need concentrate to dissolve in a liquid? How the kief doesn't hopelessly gunk up your coils, I can't imagine. Also, you may as well use 100% VG e-juice. It may not be safe, but if you like e-juice, it's probably the carrier of lowest concern, especially with TC.

My personal favorite brand is Kind Juice. It's a little more expensive, but they use natural flavors in 100% VG, and it tastes great - not like candy or soda pop. Keep in mind that natural flavors are not necessarily safer. KJ's naturally extracted tobacco flavors are a real pleasure to vape, the best I've tasted.
I bought cheap generic brand's of ejuice that I did not like.
CUTWOOD is the brand I tried that had a decent taste.
If you know a better solution I'm all hear's!

I use KIEF because it's cheap like me.
I have oil to try Friday? (expensive)
 

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