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Meds Cannabis Root

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
CANNABIS ROOT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE. HERE IS HOW

The weed root is the most underutilized part of the weed plant. Save it because it could come in handy!


We use almost every part of the weed plant: leaves, seeds, flowers, resin, fiber. During historical times, cannabis root was highly valued by our ancestors as they used them for medicine.

The Roots of Weed Therapy
Hemp root was first recorded in Chinese medical literature about 5,000 years ago. The document states that the juice of hemp root is an effective diuretic. Ancient Chinese used it to stop hemorrhages in women after they gave birth. Chinese literature also documents the use of hemp root to manufacture gunpowder.

Around 77-79 CE, Pliny, a Roman historian, published known uses of hemp root in his book Natural Histories. He said that when hemp was boiled in water, it was useful in treating joint stiffness as well as gout and similar disorders. Pliny also wrote that raw hemp root could be applied topically to soothe burn wounds.

Between the 9th and 18th CE, manuscripts in Azerbaijani also documented the popular uses of hemp roots as a decoction to treat wounds and cure fevers. It was used by Azerbaijani to treat toothaches, ulcers, and abscesses.

Throughout history there have been other little known documented uses of cannabis root. While herbal uses from the ancient and medieval times have survived to present day, it seems that the numerous useful properties of cannabis root aren’t mentioned as often as other plants. But that doesn’t mean that hemp root does not have any healthy uses.

Cannabis Roots as Medicine
Analysis of chemical compounds in these roots show why they are considered such important healing and anti-inflammatory herbs.

Cannabis roots are made up of lipids and sugars.

The ethanol extract of hemp root contains terpenes that have many benefits:

Friedelin: antioxidant and protects the liver

Epifriedelanol: can prevent the growth of tumors

Pentacyclic triterpene ketones: can kill cancer cells, reduce inflammation, act as a diuretic, and reduces bacteria

The alkaloids found in cannabis roots have the following benefits:

Piperdine: is used by pharmaceutical companies as a chemical building block to create medicine used in psychiatry


Pyrroldine: also used by pharmaceuticals as a building block in the manufacture of stimulant medications

Small quantities of choline as well as atropine are found in cannabis roots. Choline is an essential nutrient that plays an important role in maintaining health cell membranes. Post-menopausal women are at high risk for a choline deficiency, so they can benefit from consuming cannabis root tea. Altopine on the other hand can be used to relax eye muscles, and can be used to increase heart rate during resuscitation, and it also has bronchodilatory properties.

Modern Day Uses
Many people who grow cannabis and use the root to relieve many ailments and disorders. It is easy to make home-brewed cannabis root tea, all you have to do is place dried, powdered hemp root in a slow cooker for 12 hours. Anise, cinnamon, and other aromatic herbs can also be added if you a huge fan of the taste of pure hemp. Once it is done, strain the tea and drink.

Cannabis root is also used in many tinctures and liniments which are applied directly to the skin. You can use a dry, powdered form of the root as a poultice to soothe skin disorders such as dermatitis, cuts, and burns. Cannabis root used in salves, oils, and balms can also be used to treat herpes, blisters, pimple, acne, arthritis, hemorrhoids, dysmenorrhea, asthma, sore throat, colds, headaches, tension pains, migraines, and chronic inflammation of the larynx.

If you are growing your own cannabis, be sure not to throw out the roots! Take advantage of the amazing plant and dry the roots for medicinal use.

For tea, once dried, break down the roots into chunks and use a mortar and pestle or blender to grind them finely into a powder. Add the ground roots to a slow cooker, add some oil or fat, and let simmer for 12 hours.
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
CANNABIS ROOT CAN SAVE YOUR LIFE. HERE IS HOW

The weed root is the most underutilized part of the weed plant. Save it because it could come in handy!


We use almost every part of the weed plant: leaves, seeds, flowers, resin, fiber. During historical times, cannabis root was highly valued by our ancestors as they used them for medicine.

The Roots of Weed Therapy
Hemp root was first recorded in Chinese medical literature about 5,000 years ago. The document states that the juice of hemp root is an effective diuretic. Ancient Chinese used it to stop hemorrhages in women after they gave birth. Chinese literature also documents the use of hemp root to manufacture gunpowder.

Around 77-79 CE, Pliny, a Roman historian, published known uses of hemp root in his book Natural Histories. He said that when hemp was boiled in water, it was useful in treating joint stiffness as well as gout and similar disorders. Pliny also wrote that raw hemp root could be applied topically to soothe burn wounds.

Between the 9th and 18th CE, manuscripts in Azerbaijani also documented the popular uses of hemp roots as a decoction to treat wounds and cure fevers. It was used by Azerbaijani to treat toothaches, ulcers, and abscesses.

Throughout history there have been other little known documented uses of cannabis root. While herbal uses from the ancient and medieval times have survived to present day, it seems that the numerous useful properties of cannabis root aren’t mentioned as often as other plants. But that doesn’t mean that hemp root does not have any healthy uses.

Cannabis Roots as Medicine
Analysis of chemical compounds in these roots show why they are considered such important healing and anti-inflammatory herbs.

Cannabis roots are made up of lipids and sugars.

The ethanol extract of hemp root contains terpenes that have many benefits:

Friedelin: antioxidant and protects the liver

Epifriedelanol: can prevent the growth of tumors

Pentacyclic triterpene ketones: can kill cancer cells, reduce inflammation, act as a diuretic, and reduces bacteria

The alkaloids found in cannabis roots have the following benefits:

Piperdine: is used by pharmaceutical companies as a chemical building block to create medicine used in psychiatry


Pyrroldine: also used by pharmaceuticals as a building block in the manufacture of stimulant medications

Small quantities of choline as well as atropine are found in cannabis roots. Choline is an essential nutrient that plays an important role in maintaining health cell membranes. Post-menopausal women are at high risk for a choline deficiency, so they can benefit from consuming cannabis root tea. Altopine on the other hand can be used to relax eye muscles, and can be used to increase heart rate during resuscitation, and it also has bronchodilatory properties.

Modern Day Uses
Many people who grow cannabis and use the root to relieve many ailments and disorders. It is easy to make home-brewed cannabis root tea, all you have to do is place dried, powdered hemp root in a slow cooker for 12 hours. Anise, cinnamon, and other aromatic herbs can also be added if you a huge fan of the taste of pure hemp. Once it is done, strain the tea and drink.

Cannabis root is also used in many tinctures and liniments which are applied directly to the skin. You can use a dry, powdered form of the root as a poultice to soothe skin disorders such as dermatitis, cuts, and burns. Cannabis root used in salves, oils, and balms can also be used to treat herpes, blisters, pimple, acne, arthritis, hemorrhoids, dysmenorrhea, asthma, sore throat, colds, headaches, tension pains, migraines, and chronic inflammation of the larynx.

If you are growing your own cannabis, be sure not to throw out the roots! Take advantage of the amazing plant and dry the roots for medicinal use.

For tea, once dried, break down the roots into chunks and use a mortar and pestle or blender to grind them finely into a powder. Add the ground roots to a slow cooker, add some oil or fat, and let simmer for 12 hours.

Brilliant @momofthegoons, a very useful article...
I feel ashamed for not knowing this already..

Now this means I will have absolutely no waste whatsoever, as I utilise every other part of my plants...
I even reuse the grow medium in my garden for the strawberries....

I'm really looking forward to harvest now, (not that I'm wasnt anyway), to see what I can make with my roots and how effective it is....

I will be adding lemon grass, ginger, and local organic honey to my root tea....
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
I managed to aquire a root from an amnesia kush plant that I helped my novice friend harvest.... his first effort...

It's been air drying for a couple days now...
It's pretty dry, im gonna powder it and make tea tonight....

I'll report back....
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
It wasn't dry enough....
More time needed
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
And another article about the benefits of cannabis root.....

5 Reasons To Love Cannabis Roots And How To Effectively Use Them

One of the many beautiful things about cannabis is that the entire plant is useable – roots and all. Cannabis root has been used in medicines for thousands of years in salves, teas, and other preparations. Unlike the flowering tops of the plant, cannabis root will not cause a high. However, there may be some good reasons to keep a few root preparations in your medicine cabinet. Here are five reasons to love cannabis roots and how to use them at home.

Cannabis roots as medicine

Unfortunately, cannabis roots are the least studied parts of the plant. This is a shame, as humans have relied on hemp root medicines for centuries. Ancient Chinese texts provide some of the earliest records of cannabis root as medicine. The Shennong pên Ts’ao ching, which is dated to 2,700 BCE, recorded the use of hemp root pastes for pain.

Later on in the 1600s, cannabis root was reportedly used in Indonesia as a solution for gonorrhea. Additional texts site the use of hemp root for gout and painful diseases. In veterinary medicine, hemp root has been included in herbal cocktails given to sheep showing signs of disease. Here are five reasons love hemp root:


1. Pain relief

As suggested by a 1957 paper, cannabis root was boiled along with leaves into a poultice to treat skin abrasions in India. The paper cites that root was used on ailments like rashes and hemorrhoids as a painkiller and a sedative. Additional texts articulate that hemp root was commonly used as a folk medicine for arthritis and joint pain.

2. Women’s health

Cannabis and women’s health go way back. Evidence suggests that juices containing hemp root were used to relieve hemorrhage during difficult pregnancies in ancient China. In a 2002 review, neurologist and medical researcher Dr. Ethan Russo quotes:

The juice of the root is… thought to have a beneficial action in retained placenta and post-partum hemorrhage.

Concoctions using cannabis seeds and flowers were also used to help the labor process in many cultures throughout the centuries. This includes the vapor of the cannabis plant to ease tensions during a difficult childbirth.


3. Beneficial terpenes

Just like flowers and leaves, cannabis roots contain chemical compounds that are expected to have healing properties. Some of these compounds include terpenes, which are the aroma molecules that give the herb such a unique fragrance. Unlike the terpenes found on cannabis flowers, which can have floral and sweet scents, the terpenes found in cannabis root are different.

A 2016 review cites evidence that hemp root contains the terpenes friedelin and epifriedelanol. These terpenes are not found in abundance in other parts of the cannabis plant. These compounds are more bitter, deterring potential predators.

In the past, pharmaceutical researchers have investigated friedelin for its painkilling and anti-ulcerative properties. Friedelin has also been used as a topical anti-inflammatory in animal models. Additional evidence suggests that the terpene epifriedelanol has potential as an anti-tumor agent.


4. Potentially anti-cancer

Interestingly, extractions from the Malaysian plant Phyllanthus watsonii successfully halted the growth of colon cancer cells in laboratory models. The extract contained the terpenes friedelin and epifriedelanol, among other compounds.

There were also signs of a phenomenon known as apoptosis, which is a fancy term for cell-suicide. Normal cells will undergo apoptosis if they are damaged or diseased. Cancer cells, however, stop responding to signals that tell them to self-destruct.

Cannabis root not only contains both friedelin and epifriedelanol, but also contains compounds called pentacyclic triterpene ketones. These fat-soluble molecules have also been found to trigger apoptosis in cancer cells in early laboratory models.


5. Nutrients

Chemical investigations of cannabis roots have shown that they may contain trace amounts (2.0 μg/g) of cannabinoid acids.

The plant itself is famous for producing THC, the compound responsible for the psychoactive “high”. However, raw cannabis is not psychoactive. Instead, the plant is coated with the precursors to THC and other compounds. These precursors are cannabinoid acids.

Raw cannabinoid acids have been found to be anti-inflammatory, anti-nausea, and potentially anti-cancer.

Plant root systems both find and store nutrients that keep the plant healthy and alive. It’s no surprise then that the roots can also contain trace amounts of choline, which is an essential nutrient that has several vital functions in the body.

These functions include supporting liver health, nerve health, and brain health. The compound is also vital for the health of cell membranes, which partly determine how well a cell is able to receive chemical messages.

However, it’s important to keep in mind that different root samples may contain different nutrients depending on the soil and the microbes within the soil. In terms of vitamins, minerals, and cannabinoid acids, cannabis leaves and flowers hold the greatest amount of nutrients.


How to use cannabis root

There are several different ways to use cannabis root. It can be dried and saved for a later date or it can be mashed while fresh and used right away. Here are four ways to use hemp root:

1. Teas

Cannabis roots can be boiled to create a powerful tea. This tea will be significantly more bitter than tea made with leaves or flowers. Adding a little fat to the tea while brewing (via milk, coconut oil, etc.) may potentially help release some of the fat-soluble terpenes and ketones present in cannabis roots. Though, a plain tea is also thought to be beneficial.

2. Powders

One of the most traditional ways to prepare cannabis root is to dry the roots and grind them into a fine powder. This powder can then be used as a supplement added to foods, beverages, or used to fill capsules.

3. Topical

Both powdered and boiled cannabis root can be applied directly to the skin for the treatment of rashes, inflammation, pain, and abrasions. Cannabis root can also be mixed with a carrier oil to improve absorption into the skin. Coconut oil and olive oil are two common household oils to consider.

4. Tincture

Cannabis root tinctures can be made by slowly simmering cannabis roots for an extended period of time. After several hours in a slow cooker, the roots will create a goop that can be added into the tincture. Alcohol, vegetable glycerine, and apple cider vinegar are three common tincture bases. Though, alcohol is one of the most popular options.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
How to Prepare Cannabis Roots for Your Healing

Cannabis roots are ancient medicine, first recorded about 5000 years ago for aiding in labor and delivery. Today, you can harness the medicinal power of cannabis roots with a few easy, DIY steps.
Cannabis roots are good medicine for everything from stiff joints and minor infections to treating skin inflammation. There are trace amounts of cannabinoids within the roots, but this is not the medicine we are after when preparing cannabis roots for consumption.


Image credit: Lifestyle discover

Medicinal Compounds in Cannabis Roots
These important terpenes: friedelin, pentacyclic, triterpene ketones, and epifriedelanol have significant health benefits. Friedlein is an antioxidant that protects the liver; Epifriedelanol has anti-tumor benefits; the other twohave been shown to kill cancer cells, reduce inflammation, and relieve pain.

These have been used for millennia, having appeared in text from Classical Greece’s Pliny the Elder and in ancient Chinese medicinal manuscripts.


Image credit: Royal Queen Seeds

History of Cannabis Roots as Medicine
For centuries, Chinese medicine incorporated every part of the cannabis plant in traditional remedies. While the leaves, stalk and seeds all had their therapeutic purposes (from loosening up the bowels to curing postpartum depression), the ancient medicine men of the east found that the roots of Cannabis sativa were very effective during labor and delivery and as a way to cure painful blockage of the bladder.

For these practices, the Chinese had two ways of preparing the root. The first, and more straight-forward method, was to pummel fresh roots with a mortar and pestle to extract juices that could then be taken orally. The second way was to boil the root so that the essential elements could seep out into a tea-like broth through a process called decoction. It’s the same method that the Greeks would later popularize.


Image credit: Pong Pong

Proper Cleaning of the Cannabis Roots
The best method for decoction in today’s world a bit of elbow grease. First, it’s best to use fresh roots that are still full of nutrients — this means roots from plants that have been grown in clean soil. Cannabis is a powerful soil cleaner, which is great for crops, but terrible for folks who want to ingest roots free of heavy metals.

To properly decoct your roots, gently pull them from the ground, taking care to break as few strands as possible in the process. Once the roots are free, separate them from the stalk and leaves with a sharp knife. Then the cleaning begins. Soap isn’t necessary and actually may damage the roots in the process, so lukewarm to warm water is the best bet to rinse the soil from the cannabis roots. Take your time on this part, cannabis roots are notorious difficult to clean. Some modern practitioners recommend using a soft-bristled toothbrush to help separate the dirt from the roots. It’s an arduous process, but it’s worthwhile to get a clean and safe product.


Image credit: Grow Barato

Preparing the Root for Making Medicine
Once the roots are clean, dry them off and store them in a dark, cool place for 48 hours to fully dry them out. Once dry, you have two choices: You can choose to boil the roots in water or grind them into a powder. Both methods work, but mashing the roots into a powder allows you to use them in other ways (more on that later).

The standard unit for any decoction is 1 ounce of dried herb to one cup of boiling water. If you find your final product is too weak or strong, you can adjust the amounts on the next try. (If you can’t wait two days for the roots to dry out, double the amount used.) Once you’ve decided on the amount to use, add your roots to the appropriate amount water and put it on the stove over medium heat. Let the concoction simmer until about one-quarter of the water has evaporated.

Once the water is evaporated, strain the mixture and serve. You can save your decoction for up to 72 hours in the fridge.


Image credit: iSmoke

Creating Balms for Soothing Inflammation
Cannabis roots for balms also have a long history of use. To make your own, you’ll follow the steps above to extract, clean, and dry the roots of your cannabis plant. Once you have dry roots, you’ll grind them into a fine powder.

Once you have a powder, you can mix this with any kind of oil or fat and place it in a slow cooker for 12-18 hours. Use the powder from 1 to 2 root balls, 4cups of fat (like coconut oil), and 2 cups of water. Beeswax can be added to the mixture in order to harden the balm until it is ready for use. This just makes it easier to transport and store.

Once that’s done, you’ll have a root salve that can treat skin disorders like acne and blisters. It can also be rubbed on the temples for headaches and on the chest to soothe congestion, as well as on achey joints.


Image credit: Yahoo! News

Cannabis Root Tea
Another modern recipe calls for placing powdered cannabis root into a slow cooker for 12 hours, with the option of adding other herbs like anise and cinnamon to the mix. The resulting concoction can be strained and used like regular, but with the medicinal benefits of cannabis roots.

A Word of Caution About Cannabis Roots
There is a compound within the root, called alkaloid (pyrrolidine and piperidine) that is toxic at high levels. These can irritate the lining of your stomach and even be damaging to your liver. For this reason, long term use of cannabis root medicine is not recommended.


Image credit: Canna Obscura

Every part of the cannabis plant can used for nutritional or medicinal benefit. When you take down your plant, consider using all of the parts, even the cannabis roots.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
This article explains some of the things that Cannabis root will help...

Cannabis Roots Have Health Benefits in Modern Medicine



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The cannabis root contains important medicine that can fight cancer and inflammation, pain and fever, and so much more.

Using the roots of cannabis for medicinal purposes is a tradition that reaches deep beneath the surface of history. Sadly,this traditional medicine has been lost in many western cultures after decades of prohibition stigmatized its use. Recently, however, researchers have begun to investigate the ways in which we can use every part of the cannabis plant to treat a variety of ailments and conditions.

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If you’re planning to grow your own cannabis plants, you’ll want to know the extent to which you can use this wonderful plant. You may already know about the stems and buds and leaves, but dismissed the roots. However, they have their important medicinal uses!

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Menstruation, Childbirth, Menopause
Roots have been used across the world to help with women’s pain in labour and during menstruation. These contain friedelin, a compound that is also used as an aphrodisiac in India, Sri Lanka, Java, and West Africa. Friedelin is able to balance estrogen levels during menopause and to encourage menstruation. Lignans are also present in the root and these can be used in treating cancer.

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In Chinese medicine, women going through a difficult labour were once given a juice or decoction made from cannabis root. The juice would also be used to encourage expulsion of a retained placenta and to stop postpartum hemorrhage.

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Reducing Fever
The anti-inflammatory properties of friedelin have been explored recently by modern science, but they were no secret to the Persian philosopher Ibn Sina in his Canon of Medicine from the 12th century and to medical practitioners in Argentina. They were used either orally or topically. Research has shown that the cannabis root is similar to paracetamol in its abilities to break a fever. You can boil them down to create a juice.

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Treating Burns
As far back as 1542, Leonard Fuchs, a German physician, wrote of the healing properties of cannabis root in treating burns. In 1640, John Parkinson, an English botanist, agreed with Fuchs’ findings. He wrote about its anti-inflammatory qualities and the soothing effects the root has for burns. Again in 1758, in France Mercandier wrote about the healing properties of raw cannabis root for burns.

To use for burns, pound the raw root into a juice and combine with an ointment, such as aloe vera or petroleum jelly, to help it become spreadable. And apply topically.

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Treating Pain
As mentioned, cannabis root has anti-inflammatory qualities so it can help with pain in joints and across the body. Cannabis root contains monoterpenes that react with the receptors in your body to relieve pain. In particular, carvone and dihydrocarvone interact with the TRPM8 ionotropic receptor to alleviate pain and soothe your joints. These are the same monoterpenes found in spearmint, and give both plants their cooling sensations. There is some evidence to suggest that these may be able to help with osteoarthritis.

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Inflammation
Cannabis bud and leaf help with inflammation, so it makes sense that the roots would as well. Friedelin and epifriedelinol are compounds in cannabis roots that have anti-inflammatory properties. Parker and another English physician, Nicholas Culpeper, both uncovered in the 17th century the anti-inflammatory properties of a decoction of cannabis root. Later in the 18th century, Dr William Salomon, Dr Robert James, and Husain Khan all supported the conclusion that cannabis root can help with inflammation.

Modern science is just remembering what we’ve already known for centuries and this important medicine is getting the spotlight it deserves. If you’re an advocate and grow your own plants, make sure to harvest the roots for their healing properties.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
THE MEDICAL POTENTIAL AND HISTORY OF CANNABIS ROOTS



Cannabis roots may have some potential medical applications. Although research on roots is extremely limited, some compounds held within its contents seem to carry health benefits.

The cannabis plant has so many uses and almost all parts of its anatomy can be used to fulfill some kind of function. The flowers of the plant are the most appreciated and widely used, often to generate psychoactive effects when smoked or ingested in edible form. The cannabinoid-rich resin of these flowers is also exploited to make medicinal products such as oils.

The leaves of the cannabis plant are high in nutrients and can be used in salads and juices. The seeds are packed with healthy fats and protein, making for a powerful superfood. Even the stalks and stems are used on an industrial scale to make fibres, rope, canvas and more. One part of the anatomy that may seem quite neglected, perhaps because it is out of sight most of the time, are the roots.

Cannabis roots serve numerous vital functions that keep plants alive and well. To start, they anchor the plant into the soil to keep it upright. They are also responsible for the uptake of water and nutrients, keeping everything healthy and thriving. Roots can also form symbiotic relationships with fungi in order to maximise nutrient uptake efficiency. The roots also take part in respiration.

When it comes to harvest time, the roots shouldn’t just be thrown away. Although they can and will add nutrients to a compost pile, they have exciting functions that far exceed this purpose.



THE HISTORY OF CANNABIS ROOT USE
Although it's not common to hear of people using cannabis roots much these days, they have a rich history as a medical substance. Chinese texts dating back to 2700 BCE discuss the use of cannabis root as a medicine to reduce pain caused by broken bones and surgeries. The text describes how roots would be dried, then ground to form a paste. The roots were also said to be juiced or boiled to make a tea that was apparently used as a diuretic, to stop bleeding during childbirth and reduce pain from minor injuries.

The exploitation of cannabis root throughout human history does not stop there. A Roman historian by the name of Pliny the Elder is reported to have written about the medicinal use of cannabis around 79 BCE. Although some remain sceptical of Pliny as an accurate source, he detailed that raw cannabis root could be used for the treatment of burns. He also mentions the ameliorative potential of cooked cannabis root on joints and in some cases, gout.

In the not-so-distant past, an English physician by the name of William Salmon wrote about cannabis root in the 18th century. Salmon mentioned how cannabis root could be employed in the treatment of sciatica and joint pain.

CANNABIS ROOT AS A MEDICINE
Cannabis root has not undergone extensive scientific research at this point in time. However, there are anecdotal accounts of using it for a variety of medical conditions.

It is reported that chemicals within the roots may play a role in protecting the liver. A compound called friedelin was isolated from the roots and is considered to be a free radical scavenger with liver-protective properties.

Other compounds isolated from the roots of the cannabis plant named pentacyclic triterpene ketones are associated with antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects.

Cannabis roots also contain small amounts of choline. Choline is a macronutrient that is involved in numerous biological processes, including nerve function, boosting energy levels, and brain development.



CANNABIS ROOT FORMULAS
Cannabis root can be infused into a tea or tincture and can also be made into a balm used in attempt to heal wounds and burns. Powdered root is used in poultices to sooth certain skin disorders.

Some companies and dispensaries have started exploring the domain of the cannabis root and have begun making and stocking cannabis creams.

A WARNING
Although cannabis root does seem to include some possible health benefits, the alkaloids in its contents may be toxic when used in excess. If you are planning on using this root, it is worth consulting an expert or doctor before taking regular or large doses.
 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
I've heard the root was good to use, I just wasn't sure of how practical it was to harvest. It has occurred to me that it might be easier for indoor hydro growers. Thus far, I've left mine where they grew. Digging up roots during harvest isn't even a remote possibility, with trying to trim and process on my own. Though it occurs to me males are pulled, not just chopped down. There will be roots, and it won't be at a busy time to use them. I will see what I can do when the males show themselves. So much to look forward to in a garden.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
7 Facts you should know about Cannabis roots
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When we talk about the benefits of the cannabis plant, we usually refer to its buds and leaves. This doesn’t mean its roots are of no use to humanity. In fact, there isn’t any part of the cannabis plant which is useless.

Mankind has been using the roots of the cannabis plants for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Given below are a few facts about cannabis roots that each one of us should know:

1) History of Use
The first recorded use of cannabis roots for therapeutic use can be tracked down to 2700 BCE in the Pên Ts’ao Ching – translated as The Classic of Herbal Medicine. The book affirms that the plant was used as an effective remedy for pain; the roots were dried and ground up to create a paste and applied on broken bones.

Another recorded instance comes from 79 CE when the Roman historian Pliny the Elder mentioned in Naturalis Historia that cannabis roots were boiled in water and the liquid was used to treat joint cramps, gout, and bring relief from acute pain.

The 18th century also saw William Salmon, an English physician, use a mixture of barley and cannabis root to treat pelvic joint ache and sciatica.

2) Cannabis roots make for an effective lip balm
When infused with olive oil, dried cannabis roots (powder) can make for a good lip balm. Furthermore, other oils can also be used to make effective topical applications with the same.

3) Might destroy cancer cells
There isn’t much research in this particular area; hence, we can talk about only theoretical aspects. Cannabis roots are rich in pentacyclic triterpene ketones which are believed to cause apoptosis – informally referred to as ‘programmed cell death’ in cancer cells.

4) Reduces Inflammation
Until the 20th century, many physicians in the US recommended decoctions of hemp root for relieving inflammation. Again, pentacyclic triterpene ketones present in the cannabis roots are credited for its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.

5) Ensures healthy cell membranes
The roots of the cannabis plant boast small quantities of choline. In case you didn’t know, choline is an essential dietary nutrient believed to be a precursor to the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, which is vital to the maintenance of healthy cell membranes.

6) Even the roots contain CBD
Well, not just buds and flowers but even cannabis roots contain cannabinoids, although in minute quantities.

7) Possesses liver-protecting properties
A piece of research conducted in the year 1971 found that ethanol extract of the roots of the cannabis plant contains friedelin, an anti-oxidant believed to have hepaprotective (liver-protecting) properties.
 

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