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Tips Cannabis Vaping Temperatures

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
There's a lot of information out there about what temperatures are best when vaporizing. The best temperature for vaping herb is dependent on what you are vaporizing for; whether it be pain, anxiety, appetite, etc. One factor that can have an effect on what temperature you use is how moist your herb is. Dryer herb will need a lower temperature so that it doesn't combust. Fresh herb will often contain more moisture. To deal with this, it is recommended to do what‘s called a flavonoid run. Put the vaporizer at a lower temperature (around 138° – 148°C/280° - 298°F .), to dry the herb a bit. After this run, your herb should be dry enough to vaporize efficiently at THC and other cannabinoid temperatures. The temperatures below are an approximate guideline and not absolute.


Cannabanoids - The range of temperature in which all cannabinoids evaporate lies between 157 and 220 degrees Celsius (315° - 428°F). All cannabanoids have different boiling points. Lower temperatures will have more of a heady effect, and higher temperatures will have a more body effect.

THC - 157 °C (315°F).
The most famous cannabinoid. It has both euphoric and analgesic effects, inducing a great sense of relaxation.

CBD - 160 - 180 °C (320° - 356°F).
The cannabinoid most sought after by medical users for its vast array of medicinal applications. It partly counters the effects of THC, effectively countering feelings of anxiety and paranoia.

Delta-8-THC - 175 – 178 °C (347° - 352°F).
This cannabinoid is very similar to THC, but it is more stable and less psychoactive. It has great anti-vomiting properties.

CBN - 185 °C (365°F).
CBN is often found in quite small amounts, however, its effects can still be felt. It breaks down THC and is highly associated with a sedative effect.

CBC - 220 °C (428°F).
This cannabinoid has anti-inflammatory and anti-fungal properties.

THCV - 220 °C (428°F).
THCV has been shown to moderate the psychoactive effects of THC, but more research is required.
Combustion: Dry weed can begin to combust at around 200 °C. The maximum heat weed can take before starting to burn is around 230 °C., depending on how humid it is.

Flavonoids - Flavonoids are also thought to have secondary health benefits.

Beta-sitosterol - 134 °C (273°F).
This flavonoid is thought to have anti-inflammatory qualities.

Apigenin - 178 °C (352°F).
Apigenin is thought to be estrogenic, anxiolytic and have anti-inflammatory properties.

Cannflavin A - 182 °C (360°F).
This flavonoid is a COX inhibitor.

Quercetin - 250 °C (482°F).
Quercetin is an antioxidant and anti-viral flavonoid. It boils at , well out of the cannabis vaporization temperatures.

Terpinoids - Terpinoids contribute to what gives plants their unique aroma.

Beta-caryophyllene - 199 °C (390°F).
Thought to be anti-inflammatory and anti-malarial.

Alpha-terpinol - 156 °C (313°F).
This terpenoid is an antioxidant, sedative, antibiotic and anti-malarial.

Beta-myrcene - 166- 168 °C (331° - 334°F).
This is analgesic, an antibiotic and anti-inflammatory.

Delta-3-carene - 168 °C (334°F).
This terpenoid has anti-inflammatory properties.

1,8-cineole - 176 °C (349°F).
1,8-cineole increase cerebral blood flow, acts as a stimulant, and is anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and an antibiotic.

D-limonene - 177 °C (351°F).
Perhaps surpringsingly, D-limonene appears naturally in cannabis. It has anti-mutagenic, antidepressant and immune system potentiating properties.

P-cymene - 177 °C (351°F).
P-cymene is an antibiotic and an anticandidal agent.

Linalool - 198 °C (388°F).
This is an antidepressant, sedative and immune system potentiator.

Terpinol-4-ol - 209 °C (408°F).
This is an antibiotic and an AChE inhibitor.

Borneol - 210 °C (410°F).
Borneol is an antibiotic.

Alpha-terpineol - 217 °C (423°F).
This terpenoid is a sedative, antibiotic, antioxidant and AChE inhibitor.

Pulegone - 224 °C (435°F).
Pulegone is a sedative and potentially has memory boosting properties.
 
Last edited:

OldOyler

Well-Known Member
There's a lot of information out there about what temperatures are best when vaporizing. The best temperature for vaping herb is dependent on what you are vaporizing for; whether it be pain, anxiety, appetite, etc. One factor that can have an effect on what temperature you use is how moist your herb is. Dryer herb will need a lower temperature so that it doesn't combust. Fresh herb will often contain more moisture. To deal with this, it is recommended to do what‘s called a flavonoid run. Put the vaporizer at a lower temperature (around 138° – 148°C/280° - 298°F .), to dry the herb a bit. After this run, your herb should be dry enough to vaporize efficiently at THC and other cannabinoid temperatures. The temperatures below are an approximate guideline and not absolute.
Awesome mom!

:thumbsup:
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
Hi @momofthegoons, and other familiar faces....

Wasn't it recently established that all them temps related to the boiling point of cannabinoids, were in a vacuum....????

Anybody know any more on this....???
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
I will throw this out there too, which is just my opinion.
Also what is 375 degrees on one vaporizer might feel differently using the same temp and bud in a different vaporizer. There are other factors at play such as a longer or shorter air path. A shorter air path may feel more harsh. So you might decide to vaporize at a lower temp.
 

GreenHopper

20 going on 60
That was a good short article, really liked the rig they were using in the pic, needs a clean but nice and dinky:

 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Found another article on vaporizing temperatures.

Vaporizing 101: What Temperature Is Best?

Getting the correct temperature is important when using a marijuana vaporizer.

These days, it’s become common knowledge that vaporizing is the healthiest way to consume marijuana. What’s lesser known is the role that temperature plays in determining the effects a user will experience.

Heating marijuana to the correct temperature will ensure that the cannabinoids and terpenes are vaporized efficiently, leading to optimal recreational and medicinal effects.

Ideal Temperature

The ideal temperature for vaporizing cannabis is around 175 – 200°C (347 – 392°F), says Dr. Ian Mitchell, an emergency physician and clinical assistant professor at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver.

However, he notes that a recent study that examined the cannabinoid extraction of different vaporizers used 210°C (410°F) as a set point.

“In general, I would say 210°C is the best balance between efficient evaporation of terpenes and cannabinoids and smoothness of the vapor,” says Dr. Arno Hazekamp, who studies medical cannabis as the head of research at Bedrocan BV in the Netherlands.

High vs. Low Temperatures

If a user vaporizes cannabis below 180°C (356°F), they will mainly inhale terpenes because cannabinoids won’t evaporate at low temperatures, according to Dr. Hazekamp. But lower temperatures can be ideal for those who want a less intense and more awake high.

Higher temperatures tend to yield more cannabinoids, as studies by researchers in the Netherlands have shown.

In one experiment, the Volcano vaporizer only yielded 24% of cannabinoids when set at a temperature of 170°C (338°F). However, the yield jumped to 77% when the vaporizer was set to 230°C (446°F).

According to Dr. Mitchell, the best extraction of THC occurs around this temperature, although lower temperatures are likely healthier for users.

Users should take caution not to vaporize at or above 235°C (455°F) since the vapor will become harsh and could start to burn. “When that happens, you are creating the same toxic compounds as during smoking,” explains Dr. Hazekamp.

Vaporizing CBD and THC

Although some users may try to adjust the vaporizing temperature according to whether they want to feel the effects of CBD or THC more, it’s unlikely to make a significant difference.

The boiling points of these two cannabinoids are only 10°C (18°F) apart and most vaporizers do not offer that level of accuracy.

“If you are seeking to separate out THC and CBD, you are much better off controlling those in your cannabis sample rather than try to do it by differential volatility,” says Dr. Mitchell.

Dr. Hazekamp agrees and maintains that users should vaporize around 210°C (410°F) to feel the effects of both cannabinoids. “It is easy to remember and why bother with two temperatures?”

Other Things To Consider

Although specific temperature ranges are commonly recommended to those just starting out, other factors could affect the ideal temperature to vaporize. For instance, Dr. Hazekamp points out that the moisture content of the cannabis is something to consider.

“After all, when you heat cannabis in a vaporizer, the first thing to boil off is the remaining water in the plant,” he says.

Another factor is the type of vaporizer used, according to Dr. Hazekamp. For example, convection-style vaporizers (such as the Volcano and other desktop models) can be more efficient because heat is transferred more directly. However, they can also evaporate cannabis even when a user is not inhaling.

Dr. Mitchell adds that cheaply made vaporizers (such as vape pens and other conduction-style vaporizers) tend to have hotspots, which can make it difficult to keep a consistent temperature.
 

Vicki

Herbal Alchemist
Would dabbing even be considered vaporizing because it is such high temps, even with enails?
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
That's a good question. Everywhere I have looked, dabbing is defined (or described) as " the flash vaporization of cannabis concentrates once applied to a hot surface and inhaled."

Imo, the problem is that some dab at higher temps than would be considered 'true' dabbing. So unless you are using a temperature controlled nail, you can heat the nail to temperatures above the suitable temperature range for proper dabbing. A torch can heat a nail in excess of 1000° easily; which is why it's so important to let it cool down prior to dabbing when using a manual torch method. And you don't have the control you have with an enail or the ability to vape your dabs and get the full benefits of the terpenes, essential oils and taste of your concentrate. At those high temps, the essential oils that form the psychoactives in your concentrates are destroyed.

Some of the pens will shoot to temps too high for vaporization as well. My understanding is that the high resistance, titanium coils that some manufacturers (Dr. Dabber included) use achieve a lower, more stable temperature and are best for use with concentrates.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
WRT conditions under which cannabinoid boiling pints were measured....,e.g. in a vacuum and pure distillates.....well, its messy.

This is the best table I have found on the subject but best does NOT mean that I have validated the data or know their data to be more accurate than others.

http://vaporizertemp.com/components-cannabis-terpene-boiling-points-effects/

What you will see with this table is that its derived from other various scientific publications and the sources are cited at the bottom. But, it does NOT state the test conditions used for these measurements.

But at least this table cites sources, most of the pretty tables we see on this subject in MJ related publications don't have any references to support their data...just pretty pictures for the poor dumb stoners (sigh).

I have seen one source that said that tests were done under 760 mm of HG (basically a standard atmosphere) while others seem to have been take at vacuum or near vacuum.

Cannabis and Cannabis Extracts: Greater than the Sum of Their Parts? by John M. McPartland and Ethan B. Russo is a major source for many of these tables but this report relied on other sources for the original data. But my brief review of this publication doesn't show any test condition description.

Now there is the below which I think is illuminating:

http://www.gethigh.com/true-boiling-point-thc/

“I have seen conflicting reports about the vaporization point of THC,” says Dale Gieringer, PhD. Specifically, the Wikipedia page for THC says the boiling point for THC is 315 °F, and cites this article called Cannabis and Cannabis Extracts: Greater than the Sum of Their Parts? by John M. McPartland and Ethan B. Russo as a source for that number. That article includes a table with the boiling points of seven cannabinoids and cites three different primary sources for those values.

On the one hand you might think the boiling point of THC is 315 °F, but other sources list a different value. Pubchem, an online database of chemical compounds lists the boiling point of THC as 392 °F at 0.02 mm of Hg (a low pressure). Pubchem cites the National Toxicology Program (NTP) as their source. Looking deeper, we see on page 13 of the NTP’s report on THC lists the boiling point as 200 °C, or 392 °F. There’s one catch to this number though, it’s listed as the boiling point of THC at 0.02 mm Hg, meaning 392 °F is the boiling point of THC under a pressure that’s almost a vacuum.

Here’s a quick reminder from high school chemistry class: boiling points are always lower at lower pressures. According to an article by Dale Gieringer called Marijuana Water Pipe and Vaporizer Study, “the vaporization point at normal atmospheric pressure appears to be unknown, but is thought to be in the range 250-400º.”

So where lies the final verdict on the boiling point (a.k.a. vaporization point) of THC? We don’t know, but it’s definitely higher than 315 °F, and probably ever higher than 392 °F. This isn’t to say that cannabinoids won’t start to vaporize at temperatures as low as 300 °F, but other factors are at play in this scenario. Some people may prefer the taste and milder experience of low-temp vaporizing and low-temp dabbing, but those who want a higher yield on their product should definitely aim for a higher temperature.”​


So, its probably pure samples used (only cause I can't see how else they would be able to do it) and its not clear what the atmospheric pressure that was used during testing for most of these tables we see all over the net on cannabinoid boiling points. Then add in the complexity of over 100 different organic compounds all in a very complex plant matrix and its anybody's guess as to what the REAL temps are in realy world vape conditions.

I may well be wrong, but I continue to believe that all we can say on the subject is a very broad generality: lower temps are more heady, higher temps are more sedative and I'm not even sure about this broad brush of the subject.

Of course I would like to hear what @herbivore21 has to say on the subject.
 

Vicki

Herbal Alchemist
WRT conditions under which cannabinoid boiling pints were measured....,e.g. in a vacuum and pure distillates.....well, its messy.

This is the best table I have found on the subject but best does NOT mean that I have validated the data or know their data to be more accurate than others.

http://vaporizertemp.com/components-cannabis-terpene-boiling-points-effects/

What you will see with this table is that its derived from other various scientific publications and the sources are cited at the bottom. But, it does NOT state the test conditions used for these measurements.

But at least this table cites sources, most of the pretty tables we see on this subject in MJ related publications don't have any references to support their data...just pretty pictures for the poor dumb stoners (sigh).

I have seen one source that said that tests were done under 760 mm of HG (basically a standard atmosphere) while others seem to have been take at vacuum or near vacuum.

Cannabis and Cannabis Extracts: Greater than the Sum of Their Parts? by John M. McPartland and Ethan B. Russo is a major source for many of these tables but this report relied on other sources for the original data. But my brief review of this publication doesn't show any test condition description.

Now there is the below which I think is illuminating:

http://www.gethigh.com/true-boiling-point-thc/

“I have seen conflicting reports about the vaporization point of THC,” says Dale Gieringer, PhD. Specifically, the Wikipedia page for THC says the boiling point for THC is 315 °F, and cites this article called Cannabis and Cannabis Extracts: Greater than the Sum of Their Parts? by John M. McPartland and Ethan B. Russo as a source for that number. That article includes a table with the boiling points of seven cannabinoids and cites three different primary sources for those values.

On the one hand you might think the boiling point of THC is 315 °F, but other sources list a different value. Pubchem, an online database of chemical compounds lists the boiling point of THC as 392 °F at 0.02 mm of Hg (a low pressure). Pubchem cites the National Toxicology Program (NTP) as their source. Looking deeper, we see on page 13 of the NTP’s report on THC lists the boiling point as 200 °C, or 392 °F. There’s one catch to this number though, it’s listed as the boiling point of THC at 0.02 mm Hg, meaning 392 °F is the boiling point of THC under a pressure that’s almost a vacuum.

Here’s a quick reminder from high school chemistry class: boiling points are always lower at lower pressures. According to an article by Dale Gieringer called Marijuana Water Pipe and Vaporizer Study, “the vaporization point at normal atmospheric pressure appears to be unknown, but is thought to be in the range 250-400º.”

So where lies the final verdict on the boiling point (a.k.a. vaporization point) of THC? We don’t know, but it’s definitely higher than 315 °F, and probably ever higher than 392 °F. This isn’t to say that cannabinoids won’t start to vaporize at temperatures as low as 300 °F, but other factors are at play in this scenario. Some people may prefer the taste and milder experience of low-temp vaporizing and low-temp dabbing, but those who want a higher yield on their product should definitely aim for a higher temperature.”​


So, its probably pure samples used (only cause I can't see how else they would be able to do it) and its not clear what the atmospheric pressure that was used during testing for most of these tables we see all over the net on cannabinoid boiling points. Then add in the complexity of over 100 different organic compounds all in a very complex plant matrix and its anybody's guess as to what the REAL temps are in realy world vape conditions.

I may well be wrong, but I continue to believe that all we can say on the subject is a very broad generality: lower temps are more heady, higher temps are more sedative and I'm not even sure about this broad brush of the subject.

Of course I would like to hear what @herbivore21 has to say on the subject.

Thanks for the detailed reply!
 

420edc

Member
Sponsor

By Ask Project CBD on January 11, 2016

Project CBD received this inquiry from a Canadian citizen:
“I’m wondering the best way to use CBD from flowers. Smoking a high CBD strain (Charlottes Web) still got me stoned despite having very minimal THC. I am thinking about buying a Volcano Digital Vaporizer, but I want to make sure I can effectively get CBD. So, can I vaporize the THC out of cannabis flowers? Can I vaporize at 157°C and let the THC escape and then vaporize between 160°C-180°C to get just the CBD only? Or is that an impossibility and you have to have both THC and CBD together? Much appreciated, thanks for your time!”

Project CBD responds:
Thank you for contacting Project CBD. Check out the boiling point chart of various cannabinoids and terpenes attached below. THC boils at a slightly lower temperature than CBD. However, when vaporizing a strain that contains any THC at all, you still may absorb some effects. Here is why:
CBD doesn’t have a clear set boiling point. It’s more in the 160-180°C range. While THC is listed at 157 Celsius, the fact is that both will sublimate off at a lower temperature. This is similar to the way the snow disappears on a really cold day when the humidity is low and there is sun or wind—the flakes just go directly from solid to gas (water vapor) even though the temperature is seemingly too low for melting.

As great of a product as a Volcano is, it is not perfect. The digital Volcano model provides tolerances at +/- 0.5 degrees Celsius. Nevertheless, beyond that, there are marked temperature gradients in the chamber—one area will be quite hot compared to another, particularly if the herbal material is large or clumped. Thus, you cannot ensure that the herbal material will be exposed to uniform temperatures required for fractionation. Therefore, if there is THC present in the cannabis you are vaporizing, some will likely remain in the vapor even after its boiling point is exceeded.
Separating out cannabinoids from one another is practical only with industrial strength techniques, such as centrifugal partition chromatography. It can’t be done in the kitchen, unfortunately. So your best bet would be to try another strain if you do not like the psychoactivity. Cannatonic (ACDC) is one strain that can have an 18:1 CBD/THC profile. Users generally find that they can also develop a tolerance to psychoactivity over time.

I hope this is helpful. Let me know if you have further questions.
 

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