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Meds Epilepsy

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Marijuana-Based Medicine Can Reduce Epilepsy Seizures, Researchers Say
Written by David Mills | Published on April 18, 2017


A new study backs up previous research that says cannabis oil can significantly reduce the seizures for people with certain kinds of epilepsy.

Are marijuana-based products the antidote for epileptic seizures?

A study released today is joining a growing chorus of research material that concludes cannabis oil can help reduce seizures for people with certain kinds of epilepsy.

Researchers say cannabidiol cut the number of seizures in half for a sizable number of children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy.

The results of the clinical study were presented today at the American Academy of Neurology 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston. The research was sponsored by GW Pharmaceuticals, a developer of cannabidiol.

“Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control,” said study author Dr. Anup Patel, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus and a member of the American Academy of Neurology, in a press release.


What the research showed:

For their double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers followed 225 people for 14 weeks.

The LGS participants had an average age of 16 and had an average of 85 “drop seizures” a month. They had also tried an average of six epilepsy drugs that didn’t work for them and were taking an average of three epilepsy drugs during the study.

Some of the participants were given a dose of 20 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of cannabidiol daily. Others received a lower dose of 10 mg/kg daily or were given a placebo.

Researchers said those taking the higher dose had an overall decrease of 42 percent in drop seizures. In addition, 40 percent of this group had their seizures reduced by half or more.

The participants taking the lower dose had an average decrease of 37 percent in seizures. About 36 percent of this group experienced a decline in seizures by half or more.

The placebo group saw an overall decrease of 17 percent in seizures. About 15 percent had their seizures decline by half or more.

Researchers added that those in the high-dose group were 2.6 times more likely to say their overall condition had improved than the those taking the placebo.

There were side effects for 94 percent of those taking the higher dose and 84 percent of those taking the lower dose. About 72 percent of the placebo group reported side effects.

However, the side effects were mild to moderate symptoms such as loss of appetite and sleepiness according to the researchers.

The researchers said there are plans to submit a new drug application for cannabidiol to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures,” said Patel. “This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well tolerated. I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients.”
Cont.

A summary of the Epilepsy Foundation's views of Medical Marijuana and Epilepsy can be found in detail here. In short, their stance is:

The Epilepsy Foundation is committed to supporting physician-directed care, and to exploring and advocating for all potential treatment options for epilepsy, including cannabidiol (CBD) oil and medical cannabis. We support safe, legal access to medical cannabis if a patient and their health care team feel that the potential benefits of medical cannabis for uncontrolled epilepsy outweigh the risks.

While not everyone with epilepsy should or would consider medical cannabis as a treatment option, some people living with uncontrolled seizures have reported beneficial effects and reduced seizure activity when using medical cannabis, especially strains rich in CBD. Further research is needed on the effects of medical cannabis on epilepsy, but when prescribed by a treating physician, medical cannabis may be the best alternative for some individuals living with drug-resistant epilepsy and uncontrolled seizures. Legal access to cannabis will support increased research efforts and allow individuals who have failed to gain seizure control an option for treatment.

Learn more about the Epilepsy Foundation's medical cannabis advocacy and public policy priorities here.
 
Last edited:

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Marijuana-Based Medicine Can Reduce Epilepsy Seizures, Researchers Say
Written by David Mills | Published on April 18, 2017


A new study backs up previous research that says cannabis oil can significantly reduce the seizures for people with certain kinds of epilepsy.

Are marijuana-based products the antidote for epileptic seizures?

A study released today is joining a growing chorus of research material that concludes cannabis oil can help reduce seizures for people with certain kinds of epilepsy.

Researchers say cannabidiol cut the number of seizures in half for a sizable number of children and adults with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a severe form of epilepsy.

The results of the clinical study were presented today at the American Academy of Neurology 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston. The research was sponsored by GW Pharmaceuticals, a developer of cannabidiol.

“Our study found that cannabidiol shows great promise in that it may reduce seizures that are otherwise difficult to control,” said study author Dr. Anup Patel, of Nationwide Children’s Hospital and The Ohio State University College of Medicine in Columbus and a member of the American Academy of Neurology, in a press release.


What the research showed:

For their double-blind, placebo-controlled study, researchers followed 225 people for 14 weeks.

The LGS participants had an average age of 16 and had an average of 85 “drop seizures” a month. They had also tried an average of six epilepsy drugs that didn’t work for them and were taking an average of three epilepsy drugs during the study.

Some of the participants were given a dose of 20 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of cannabidiol daily. Others received a lower dose of 10 mg/kg daily or were given a placebo.

Researchers said those taking the higher dose had an overall decrease of 42 percent in drop seizures. In addition, 40 percent of this group had their seizures reduced by half or more.

The participants taking the lower dose had an average decrease of 37 percent in seizures. About 36 percent of this group experienced a decline in seizures by half or more.

The placebo group saw an overall decrease of 17 percent in seizures. About 15 percent had their seizures decline by half or more.

Researchers added that those in the high-dose group were 2.6 times more likely to say their overall condition had improved than the those taking the placebo.

There were side effects for 94 percent of those taking the higher dose and 84 percent of those taking the lower dose. About 72 percent of the placebo group reported side effects.

However, the side effects were mild to moderate symptoms such as loss of appetite and sleepiness according to the researchers.

The researchers said there are plans to submit a new drug application for cannabidiol to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

“Our results suggest that cannabidiol may be effective for those with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome in treating drop seizures,” said Patel. “This is important because this kind of epilepsy is incredibly difficult to treat. While there were more side effects for those taking cannabidiol, they were mostly well tolerated. I believe that it may become an important new treatment option for these patients.”
Cont.

A summary of the Epilepsy Foundation's views of Medical Marijuana and Epilepsy can be found in detail here. In short, their stance is:



Learn more about the Epilepsy Foundation's medical cannabis advocacy and public policy priorities here.
Wonderful. I has been my vague opinion based on some readings that MJ is a very promising approach for epilepsy and other movement disorders. Thanks for posting.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Marijuana extract helps some kids with epilepsy, study says

By Marilynn Marchione | AP May 25 at 10:29 AM
A medicine made from marijuana, without the stuff that gives a high, cut seizures in kids with a severe form of epilepsy in a study that strengthens the case for more research into pot’s possible health benefits.

“This is the first solid, rigorously obtained scientific data” that a marijuana compound is safe and effective for this problem, said one study leader, Dr. Orrin Devinsky of NYU Langone Medical Center.

He said research into promising medical uses has been hampered by requiring scientists to get special licenses, plus legal constraints and false notions of how risky marijuana is.

“Opiates kill over 30,000 Americans a year, alcohol kills over 80,000 a year. And marijuana, as best we know, probably kills less than 50 people a year,” Devinsky said.

The study was published Wednesday by the New England Journal of Medicine.

For years, desperate patients and parents have argued for more research and wider access to marijuana, with only anecdotal stories and small, flawed studies on their side. The new study is the first large, rigorous test — one group got the drug, another got a dummy version, and neither patients, parents nor doctors knew who took what until the study ended.

It tested a liquid form of cannabidiol, one of marijuana’s more than 100 ingredients, called Epidiolex, (eh’-pih-DYE’-uh-lehx). It doesn’t contain THC, the hallucinogenic ingredient, and is not sold anywhere yet, although its maker, GW Pharmaceuticals of London, is seeking U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval.

The company paid for, designed and helped run the study, and another doctor involved in the study has related patents.

Patients in the study have Dravet (drah-VAY) syndrome , a type of epilepsy usually caused by a faulty gene. It starts in infancy and causes frequent seizures, some so long-lasting they require emergency care and can be fatal. Kids develop poorly, and their mental impairment seems related to the frequency of seizures — from 4 to as many as 1,717 a month in this study.

Allison Hendershot’s 12-year-old daughter Molly was four months old when she had her first. It lasted an hour and a half, and emergency room doctors medically induced a coma to stop it. Molly, who lives in Rochester, New York, has tried more than half a dozen medicines and a special diet, but her seizures continued.

“We literally could not count how many” before she started in the study, her mom said.

It included 120 children and teens, ages 2 to 18, in the U.S. and Europe. They took about a teaspoon of a sweet-smelling oil twice a day (drug or placebo) plus their usual anti-seizure medicines for 14 weeks. Their symptoms were compared to the previous four weeks.

Serious seizures with convulsions dropped from around 12 a month to about six for those on the drug and did not change in the others. Three patients on the drug became seizure-free during the study.

It’s no panacea, though. Diarrhea, vomiting, fatigue, sleep problems and other issues were more frequent in the drug group. Twelve patients quit the study — nine on the drug and three in the placebo group.

Hendershot thinks her daughter got the dummy medicine because they saw no change in her seizures until the study ended and all participants were allowed to try the drug.

By the second day they saw a difference, and “she went seizure-free for two months. It was pretty remarkable,” Hendershot said.

The fact the drug came from marijuana “did not matter to me at all,” she said. “If it helps, we’re happy. I think people hear ‘cannabis’ or that it comes from marijuana and immediately there’s a stigma attached to it.”

For those who swear marijuana helped them, “anecdote has been confirmed by data,” Dr. Samuel Berkovic writes in a commentary in the medical journal. He is an epilepsy researcher at the University of Melbourne in Australia, where medical marijuana was legalized last year, and has worked with Devinsky in the past.

The drug is being tested in a second large study in kids with Dravet syndrome, and in studies of some other types of epilepsy.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Medicinal marijuana helps Waretown boy




David Mitchell, 63, of Waretown, Ocean Township. Mitchell is a medicinal marijuana user and his son, Ashton 7, who has epilepsy, which helps him. July 25, 2017 (Craig Matthews/Staff Photographer)

OCEAN TOWNSHIP — No one has to tell David Mitchell about the positive effects medicinal marijuana can have on a person’s quality of life.

Mitchell has seen it work wonders for his 7-year-old son, Ashton, who has epilepsy and cerebral palsy, is blind and nonverbal and uses a wheelchair.

“Prior to the introduction of medical marijuana in the summer of 2015, my son was hospitalized every month in the ICU for a week to two weeks because of seizures. The seizures were uncontrollable once they started. The last one in (August) 2015 lasted over 10 hours,” said Mitchell, 63.


The 10-hour seizure tweaked something in Ashton’s brain, so when he enters the deepest part of his sleep cycle, his brain forgets to tell his lungs to breathe — so he is on oxygen and a ventilator, Mitchell said.

Ashton has gone into cardiac arrest due to the intensity of his seizures, and his father has had to perform lifesaving CPR on him several times.

It was at this point that David Mitchell and his wife, Dana, Ashton’s mother, decided to give medicinal marijuana a try.


“The pharmaceuticals were not working. We talked about it. We talked to his doctors about it. We registered in the (New Jersey Medicinal Marijuana) program. My wife had to register as his caregiver,” David Mitchell said. “A person with epilepsy, it’s a struggle every day of their life.”

The closest marijuana dispensary to where they live is the Compassionate Care Foundation in Egg Harbor Township.

The Mitchells had to decide what strain of marijuana to give their son. They picked a strain called Shark Shock, which has medical uses for pain, stress and muscle spasms.

Mitchell buys the marijuana as buds. He uses a device called the Magical Butter Machine to extract the essence of the cannabis into coconut oil. He combines the cannabis and coconut oil with chocolate pudding to feed to his son.

When Mitchell makes a batch of medicinal marijuana, he ends up with 600 milliliters, which lasts about five weeks.

Ashton receives three doses a day: once at breakfast, a smaller dose at 3 p.m. and a nighttime dose at 7 p.m.

Ashton has been on medicinal marijuana since August 2015, but he also is still on pharmaceuticals, Mitchell said.


“From 2015 until now, he still has breakthrough seizures. ... But he has probably had (only) a half-dozen since that time,” said Mitchell, who added only two of the half-dozen seizures lasted more than 5 minutes.

Mitchell said he has noticed he has been able to sometimes talk his son out of a seizure since he has been taking the medical marijuana, and he could not do that previously.

Ashton can hear. He has learned about 40 language signs, using his sense of touch. He can crawl. He can say hi, bye and Mom and Dad.

“The medical marijuana truly works. It keeps it (the seizures) at bay,” said Mitchell, who added his son has the worst type of cerebral palsy. “He used to sleep in the fetal position. Three days after introducing medical marijuana, he slept with his legs straight.”

The Mitchells have a Facebook group page dedicated to their son called “givingourallforashton,” which chronicles his triumphs and his lulls.

“The medical marijuana has helped him tremendously,” Mitchell said. “It (cannabis) is an amazing medicine. That’s what people have to understand.”
 

Reflections

Member
My son has been having seizures since he was 6 months old. He is now 31 years old.
The first 3 he had were considered febrile seizures,since he got them when got sick and his temp rose past 102 or more,so they had me medicate with tylenol whenever he started to shows ANY signs of getting sick. The fourth seizure happened when he was 17 and it was a real bad one. He just had heart surgery for wpw that we found he had when playing football and the coach over extended him. He had the seizure 4 days after surgery so we attributed it to that. Now he is in the data base where they have to report to the dmv..meaning he cant drive for 7 years due to the surgery.

So he waits 7 years seizure free so he can get his license to drive. He doesnt have seizures every day..or every year...He gets his license and drives for years.. then on Christmas morning at 8 am ,he is playing a video game and has a violent seizure...scared us to death..took him to ER. It is so scary viewing them and trying to help..

So the Drs said we need to medicate him if he wants to drive,and my son decided to do.
He has had alot of bad reactions to the medication. His stomach is trashed with IBS teeth going bad,loss of hair and psorrissis,not to mention personality changes,just to name a few. He got to a point where he was so tired of the pills that he wanted to quit them.So we worked with the neurologist on weening him off of them. Lowering the dosage according to dr and a week later he had another seizure.

He hates his meds and we have mentioned how marijuana can perhaps be better,but he was raised under the DARE program at public schools and is totally against drugs..I wish I could change his mind..but he works also and they do drug tests, I dont think that the part they use in the plant can be detected by tests..can they? Since he went back on his meds since he had last seizure trying to quit them..been about another 4 years.. he hasnt had one but the other side effects from his epilepsy pills are running rampant.. All of the other anti-seizure drugs have bad side effects...sighs
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
What a heart breaking story @Reflections . I can't imagine watching anyone, much less my child, go through that. And your poor son...

I dont think that the part they use in the plant can be detected by tests..can they?
I don't think that the person in the above article (if that's the one you're citing) used only CBD. If there is any THC in the product your son ingested there is a chance it would show up in a drug test. However CBD products would not. I would make sure the products were tested though to double check if his job would be on the line. I know my CBD salve doesn't contain anything that shows on a urine test. He could use something like that, at the very least, for his psoriasis.

I think many of the people using cannabis for epilepsy use it in conjunction with their other meds.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis oil treating Epilepsy, 173 years ago

William Brooke O’Shaughnessy
Everyday I read articles about scientific breakthroughs concerning the medical properties of cannabis, this morning I read an article on how CBD is “a wonder medicine for pediatric epilepsy’ and how Amylea Nunez, aged two months was the youngest patient to be prescribed cannabis oil. However, she is not the youngest and cannabis oil as a treatment in paediatric epilepsy is not a new discovery, it is merely a rediscovery.

Dr WB O’Shaughnessy
In 1840, Victorian Doctors were treating people with extracts of cannabis for many illnesses, including tinctures for treating children with epilepsy.

One of my favourite pioneers was Dr William Brooke O’Shaughnessy MD, an irish physician, surgeon, Professor of chemistry, scientist and innovator, he was a pioneer of ‘intravenous therapy’ and he is the man credited with introducing cannabis to Western medicine.

O’Shaughnessy graduated in 1829 with a Medical Doctorate from the University of Edinburgh. In 1831, at the young age of 22, he investigated cholera and his early work led to the development of intravenous fluid and electrolyte-replacement therapy.

In 1833, O’Shaughnessy moved to Calcutta, India to work for the British East India Company and during his time there he developed new cannabinoid extraction techniques which he used is preparations to treat patients suffering from, cholera, tetanus, analgesia, rheumatism and epilepsy in infants.

In India, he initially studied botanical pharmacology and chemistry, publishing his first paper on medical cannabis in 1839.

In his paper “On the preparations of the Indian hemp, or Gunjah” published in the Provincial Medical Journal, London on February 4th, 1843, O’Shaughnessey relates the case of a baby just over a month old who he administered an ethanol (alcohol) cannabis based tincture.

Please remember this was written 173 years ago.

Case of Infantile Convulsions, 1843

“A very interesting case of this disease has recently occurred in my private practice, the particulars of which I have the permission of the family to insert in this paper. A female infant, forty days old, the child of Mr. and Mrs. J. L., of Calcutta, on the 10th of September had a slight attack of convulsions, which recurred chiefly at night for about a fortnight, and for which the usual purgatives-warm baths and a few doses of calomel and chalk-were given without effect. On that day the attacks were almost unceasing, and amounted to regular tetanic paroxysms. The child had, moreover, completely lost appetite and was emaciating rapidly”


“I had by this time exhausted all the usual methods of treatment, and the child was apparently in a binking state. Under these circumstances I stated to the parents the results of the experiments I had made with the hemp, and my conviction that it would relieve their infant if relief could possibly be obtained. They gladly consented to the trial, and a single drop of the spirituous tincture, equal to the one-twentieth part of a grain in weight, was placed on the child’s tongue at 10pm.”
1/20th of a grain is 3.24mgs

“No immediate effect was perceptible, and in an hour and a half two drops more were given. The infant fell asleep in a few minutes, and slept soundly till 4pm, when she awoke, screamed for food, took the breast free!y, and fell asleep again. At 9am, 1st of October, I found the child fast asleep, but easily roused; the pulse, countenance, and skin perfectly natural. In this drowsy state she continued for four days totally free from convulsive symptoms in any form.

“During this time the bowels were frequently spontaneously relieved, and the appetite returned to the natural degree. October 4th, At 1am, convulsions returned and continued at intervals during the day; 5 drop doses of the tincture were given hourly. Up to midnight there were 30 fits, and 44 drops of the tincture of hemp were ineffectually given.”

“Paroxysms continued during the night. At 11am, it was found that the tincture in use during the preceding days had been kept by the servant in a small bottle with a paper stopper, the spirit had evaporated and the whole of the resin had settled on the sides of the phial. The infant had in fact becn taking drops of mere water during the preceding day.”
Always shake cannabis preparations before use and store in the fridge.

“A new preparation was given in 3 drop doses during the 5th and 6th, and increased to 8 drops with the effect of diminishing the violence, though not of preventing the return of the paroxysm. On the 7th I met Dr. Nicholson in consultation, and despairing of a cure from the hemp, it was agreed to intermit its use, to apply a mustard poultice to the epigastrium, and to give a dose of castor oil and turpentine.”

“The child, however, rapidly became worse, and at 2pm, a tetanic spasm set in, which lasted without intermission till 6.30pm. A cold bath was tried without solution of the spasm; the hemp was, therefore, again resorted to, and a dose of 30 drops, equal to one and a-half grains of the resin, given at once.”

Approx: 100mgs

“Immediately after this dose was given the limbs relaxed, the little patient fell fast asleep, and so continued for 13 hours. While asleep, she was evidently under the peculiar influence of the drug. On the 8th October, at 4am, there was a severe fit, and from this hour to 10pm, 25 fits occurred, and 130 drops of the tincture were given in 30 drop doses”

Dr O’Shaughnessy (quite correctly) increased the dose

“It was now manifestly a struggle between the disease and the remedy; but at 10pm, she was again narcotised, and from that hour no fit returned”

“The child is now 17/12/1842 in the enjoyment of robust health, and has regained her natural plump and happy appearance. In reviewing this case several very remarkable circumstances present themselves. At first we find 3 drops, causing profound narcotism, subsequently we find 130 drops daily required to produce the same effect”

He was learning about how tolerance builds, hence the requirement to increase the dose (slowly).

“Should the disease ever recur, it will be a matter of much interest to notice the quantity of the tincture requisite to afford relief. The reader will remember that this infant was but 60 days old when 130 drops were given in one day, of the same preparation of which ten drops had intoxicated the student Dinonath Dhur, who took the drug for experiment”

Dr O’Shaughnessy concludes:

“The preceding cases constitute an abstract of my experience on this subject, and constitute the grounds of my belief that in hemp the profession has gained an anti-convulsive remedy of the greatest value”

The Doctor explains how he prepares his preparations


“The resinous extract is prepared by boiling the rich, adhesive tops of the dried gunjah, in spirit, until all the resin is dissolved. The tincture thus obtained is evaporated to dryness by distillation, or in a vessel placed over a pot of boiling water. The extract softens at a gentle heat, and can be made into pills without any addition”

The alcohol he used was 84.5% ethanol, he was preparing what many people today would refer to as a FECO extraction (full extract cannabis oil).

“Doses, ec.-In tetanus a drachm of the tincture is every half hour until the paroxysms cease, or catalepsy is induced”
A drachm is 1.77 grams and tetanus is also referred to as lockjaw

“In hydrophobia I would recommend the resin in soft pills, to the extent of 10 to 20 grains to be chewed by the patient, and repeated according to the effect”
10 to 20 grains is 0.65 grams to 1.3 grams, and from Dr O’Shaughnessy’s description of the pill making process it is actually cannabis oil as we now know it, 1.3 grams is a very significant dose. Hydrophobia is a common symptom of Rabies.

“With the alcoholic extract made from the tops in the way I recommend the practitioner has only to feel his way, and increase the dose until he produces intoxication as the test of the remedy having taken effect”
“Of all powerful narcotics it is the safest to use with boldness and decision”

I fully concur
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
And here is the story, referenced above, about Amylea Nunez who was the youngest patient to be prescribed cannabis at 2 months of age.
http://www.alternet.org/drugs/infant-overcomes-seizures-youngest-patient-cannabis-oil
Infant Overcomes Seizures After Becoming Youngest Patient to Take Cannabis Oil
Amylea Nunez had to leave her home state and go to Colorado to get the treatment she needed.

By Travis Gettys
June 1, 2016, 11:54 AM GMT

An infant is back home after traveling with her family to Colorado, where she became the youngest patient to be treated with a controversial cannabis oil.

Amylea Nunez suffered from frequent and debilitating seizures that sometimes prevented her from waking up for a full day, and she was diagnosed shortly after her December birth with a rare form of epilepsy, reported KRQE-TV.

“There’s times were she would only wake up every other day,” said her father, Ernie Nunez. “Just sitting there while she’s having a seizure, it’s horrible and there’s nothing you can do. The worst one was an hour long.”

Doctors prescribed eight different medications for the newborn infant, but her condition remained relatively unchanged.

Amylea was flown from New Mexico to a hospital in Aurora, Colorado, where the baby’s parents begged doctors to prescribe cannabis oil.

Doctors were reluctant to give the drug to such a young patient, but they eventually agreed — although physicians wouldn’t administer cannabis oil themselves.

Amylea began cannabis oil at two months old, and she lifted her head for the first time three months later.

“It was kind of like I could tell the doctors, ‘Look what she’s capable of,’ compared to them saying she’s never going to be able to hold up her head,” said her mother, Nicole Nunez.

She came back home to Albuquerque last week, at six months old, and her family said the baby still requires special care.

“We still have to get her back to eating by mouth because the seizures did so much to her ability to be able to actually take a bottle like a normal baby,” said Ernie Nunez.

The family is applying for a medical marijuana card in New Mexico, and they hope to change state laws to help other children suffering from seizures.

Amylea is still taking a hemp oil called Haleigh’s Hope, and she and her family must still return to Colorado for checkups.

Her parents encouraged others to consider cannabis oil to treat some childhood illnesses.

“Always speak up for your kids,” said Nicole Nunez. “I’m very glad I fought.”

 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
CBD for epilepsy? The current science behind using CBD for seizure control.
By Rachel Garland on October 25, 2017

If you’ve come this far you’ve no doubt heard about people using cannabis-derived CBD for epilepsy.

Does it really work? What have scientists found so far about using CBD for seizure control?

Each year approximately 150,000 Americans are diagnosed with epilepsy.

In fact, 1 in 26 people will experience recurring seizures during their lifetime.

While the seizures themselves are usually not harmful, the danger lies in the complications that can occur.

Depending on where or what someone is doing when a seizure strikes, there is a risk of sustaining serious injuries such as a head injury, broken bones, or even drowning.

Therefore, preventing seizures from occurring is vital.

Evidence indicates cannabis is an effective treatment for reducing seizures.

Considering that Americans alone spend more than $15.5 billion treating epilepsy every year, why not consider cannabis and CBD for epilepsy?

What causes an epileptic seizure?


In order to understand how cannabis and CBD helps seizures, it’s important to know how a seizure develops in the first place.

Seizures are caused by a sudden rush of electrical activity in the brain.

This surge of electrical impulses can spread to the muscles, causing convulsions or twitching.

While we still know very little when it comes to identifying why epileptic seizures occur, there are some known risk factors such as:

  • Brain tumors
  • Low levels of sodium or blood sugar
  • Head injuries
  • Stroke
  • Low oxygen during birth
Not everyone who experiences a seizure is epileptic.

Epilepsy is diagnosed by recurrent seizures.

However, patients with epilepsy may experience more than one type of seizure.

Seizures generally fall into one of two categories – generalized and partial.

Generalized seizures are characterized by electrical impulses throughout the brain while partial seizures occur in a select portion of the brain.

How is epilepsy treated?

Current treatments for epilepsy aim to reduce the number of seizures and alleviate related symptoms.

Prescription pills are the most common treatment for epilepsy, typically in the form of anticonvulsants.

Anticonvulsants are prescribed to calm hyperactivity in the brain.

However, they also come with a number of nasty side effects such as:

  • Fatigue
  • Dizziness
  • Drowsiness
  • Skin Rashes
  • Nausea
  • Blurred Vision
  • Tremors
  • Impaired Coordination
  • Weight Gain
  • Depression
  • Memory Problems
  • Headaches
  • Loss of Appetite
Coping with these side effects can seriously hinder a person’s quality of life, and these drugs affect everyone differently.

Some people experience no side effects while other people experience several.

For people who deal with debilitating side effects, the impact is life altering.

And what if there was another option?


Is cannabis good for epilepsy?

Cannabis as a treatment for epilepsy has made it to the mainstream through stories such as Charlotte Figi, a young girl who went from having 300 grand mal seizures a week to only three or four times a month.

But is there any scientific proof to these claims?

There is substantial evidence which indicates cannabis contains anticonvulsant properties.

Although our understanding is still developing, we know that cannabis can reduce the frequency and intensity of epileptic seizures in SOME patients.

The role of CBD for seizure control
One of the reasons cannabis is an effective treatment for epilepsy has to do with a compound known as CBD.

CBD, or cannabidiol, is one of at least 113 active cannabinoids in cannabis.

CBD has gained notoriety over the years due to its extensive medical benefits.

Unlike the other most common cannabinoid in cannabis, THC, CBD does not produce euphoric effects.

Research suggests CBD contains anticonvulsant properties.

How does CBD help seizures? Scientists are looking into it…

A study published in The New England Journal of Medicine revealed a positive correlation between cannabidiol and seizure reductions.

The study involved 120 children and teenagers with Dravet Syndrome – a rare genetic epileptic disorder.

Dravet Syndrome is characterized by frequent and prolonged seizures. Often severe, this disorder typically responds poorly to prescription drugs.

During the study, the researchers divided the group in half.

One group received CBD, the others a placebo.

Over the course of a 14-week period, the group who received the CBD saw a significant decrease in the number of seizures.

Children who were given CBD experienced an average number of 5.9 seizures per month, a substantial reduction from 12.4 seizures per month.

The other group of children who were given the placebo showed minimal contrast at 14.1 seizures per month to 14.9.

The principle investigator for the study, Orrin Devinsky, director of the Comprehensive Epilepsy Center at New York University Langone Medical Center even stated:

“This study clearly established cannabidiol as an effective anti-seizure drug for this disorder and this age group.”

More scientific studies on CBD for epilepsy

Another study from the Children’s Hospital Colorado also indicated the therapeutic value of CBD in reducing epileptic seizures.

Patients suffering from epilepsy were given a cannabis extract containing CBD.

Researchers found that 57% of patients experienced some seizure reduction, while 33% experienced seizure reduction by 50% or more.

These results are astonishing and far from alone.

Just take a recent study from Mexico in March of 2017. The study examined the efficacy of CBD in treating patients with Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome, a rare form of epilepsy.

The study involved 38 patients.

Using a pure CBD oil, the researchers found that 86% of patients reported a 50 percent reduction in motor seizures, while more than half of patients reported a 75% decrease in overall seizures, and 13% of patients experienced a total remission of seizures.

It’s also important to note that none of the patients experienced negative side effects.

The bottom line in using CBD for epilepsy

The research clearly indicates cannabis-derived CBD has a positive impact in treating epilepsy, particularly the compound cannabidiol.

Yet, the vast majority of patients with epilepsy still do not have safe access to cannabis medicine.


 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis oil treating Epilepsy, 173 years ago

William Brooke O’Shaughnessy

Everyday I read articles about scientific breakthroughs concerning the medical properties of cannabis, this morning I read an article on how CBD is “a wonder medicine for pediatric epilepsy’ and how Amylea Nunez, aged two months was the youngest patient to be prescribed cannabis oil. However, she is not the youngest and cannabis oil as a treatment in paediatric epilepsy is not a new discovery, it is merely a rediscovery.


Dr WB O’Shaughnessy



In 1840, Victorian Doctors were treating people with extracts of cannabis for many illnesses, including tinctures for treating children with epilepsy.

One of my favourite pioneers was Dr William Brooke O’Shaughnessy MD, an irish physician, surgeon, Professor of chemistry, scientist and innovator, he was a pioneer of ‘intravenous therapy’ and he is the man credited with introducing cannabis to Western medicine.

O’Shaughnessy graduated in 1829 with a Medical Doctorate from the University of Edinburgh. In 1831, at the young age of 22, he investigated cholera and his early work led to the development of intravenous fluid and electrolyte-replacement therapy.

In 1833, O’Shaughnessy moved to Calcutta, India to work for the British East India Company and during his time there he developed new cannabinoid extraction techniques which he used is preparations to treat patients suffering from, cholera, tetanus, analgesia, rheumatism and epilepsy in infants.

In India, he initially studied botanical pharmacology and chemistry, publishing his first paper on medical cannabis in 1839.

In his paper “On the preparations of the Indian hemp, or Gunjah” published in the Provincial Medical Journal, London on February 4th, 1843, O’Shaughnessey relates the case of a baby just over a month old who he administered an ethanol (alcohol) cannabis based tincture.

Please remember this was written 173 years ago.

Case of Infantile Convulsions, 1843

“A very interesting case of this disease has recently occurred in my private practice, the particulars of which I have the permission of the family to insert in this paper. A female infant, forty days old, the child of Mr. and Mrs. J. L., of Calcutta, on the 10th of September had a slight attack of convulsions, which recurred chiefly at night for about a fortnight, and for which the usual purgatives-warm baths and a few doses of calomel and chalk-were given without effect. On that day the attacks were almost unceasing, and amounted to regular tetanic paroxysms. The child had, moreover, completely lost appetite and was emaciating rapidly”
“I had by this time exhausted all the usual methods of treatment, and the child was apparently in a binking state. Under these circumstances I stated to the parents the results of the experiments I had made with the hemp, and my conviction that it would relieve their infant if relief could possibly be obtained. They gladly consented to the trial, and a single drop of the spirituous tincture, equal to the one-twentieth part of a grain in weight, was placed on the child’s tongue at 10pm.”

1/20th of a grain is 3.24mgs

“No immediate effect was perceptible, and in an hour and a half two drops more were given. The infant fell asleep in a few minutes, and slept soundly till 4pm, when she awoke, screamed for food, took the breast free!y, and fell asleep again. At 9am, 1st of October, I found the child fast asleep, but easily roused; the pulse, countenance, and skin perfectly natural. In this drowsy state she continued for four days totally free from convulsive symptoms in any form.

“During this time the bowels were frequently spontaneously relieved, and the appetite returned to the natural degree. October 4th, At 1am, convulsions returned and continued at intervals during the day; 5 drop doses of the tincture were given hourly. Up to midnight there were 30 fits, and 44 drops of the tincture of hemp were ineffectually given.”

“Paroxysms continued during the night. At 11am, it was found that the tincture in use during the preceding days had been kept by the servant in a small bottle with a paper stopper, the spirit had evaporated and the whole of the resin had settled on the sides of the phial. The infant had in fact becn taking drops of mere water during the preceding day.”

Always shake cannabis preparations before use and store in the fridge.

“A new preparation was given in 3 drop doses during the 5th and 6th, and increased to 8 drops with the effect of diminishing the violence, though not of preventing the return of the paroxysm. On the 7th I met Dr. Nicholson in consultation, and despairing of a cure from the hemp, it was agreed to intermit its use, to apply a mustard poultice to the epigastrium, and to give a dose of castor oil and turpentine.”
“The child, however, rapidly became worse, and at 2pm, a tetanic spasm set in, which lasted without intermission till 6.30pm. A cold bath was tried without solution of the spasm; the hemp was, therefore, again resorted to, and a dose of 30 drops, equal to one and a-half grains of the resin, given at once.”

Approx: 100mgs

“Immediately after this dose was given the limbs relaxed, the little patient fell fast asleep, and so continued for 13 hours. While asleep, she was evidently under the peculiar influence of the drug. On the 8th October, at 4am, there was a severe fit, and from this hour to 10pm, 25 fits occurred, and 130 drops of the tincture were given in 30 drop doses”

Dr O’Shaughnessy (quite correctly) increased the dose

“It was now manifestly a struggle between the disease and the remedy; but at 10pm, she was again narcotised, and from that hour no fit returned”

“The child is now 17/12/1842 in the enjoyment of robust health, and has regained her natural plump and happy appearance. In reviewing this case several very remarkable circumstances present themselves. At first we find 3 drops, causing profound narcotism, subsequently we find 130 drops daily required to produce the same effect”

He was learning about how tolerance builds, hence the requirement to increase the dose (slowly).

“Should the disease ever recur, it will be a matter of much interest to notice the quantity of the tincture requisite to afford relief. The reader will remember that this infant was but 60 days old when 130 drops were given in one day, of the same preparation of which ten drops had intoxicated the student Dinonath Dhur, who took the drug for experiment”

Dr O’Shaughnessy concludes:

“The preceding cases constitute an abstract of my experience on this subject, and constitute the grounds of my belief that in hemp the profession has gained an anti-convulsive remedy of the greatest value”

The Doctor explains how he prepares his preparations

“The resinous extract is prepared by boiling the rich, adhesive tops of the dried gunjah, in spirit, until all the resin is dissolved. The tincture thus obtained is evaporated to dryness by distillation, or in a vessel placed over a pot of boiling water. The extract softens at a gentle heat, and can be made into pills without any addition”

The alcohol he used was 84.5% ethanol, he was preparing what many people today would refer to as a FECO extraction (full extract cannabis oil).

“Doses, ec.-In tetanus a drachm of the tincture is every half hour until the paroxysms cease, or catalepsy is induced”

A drachm is 1.77 grams and tetanus is also referred to as lockjaw

“In hydrophobia I would recommend the resin in soft pills, to the extent of 10 to 20 grains to be chewed by the patient, and repeated according to the effect”

10 to 20 grains is 0.65 grams to 1.3 grams, and from Dr O’Shaughnessy’s description of the pill making process it is actually cannabis oil as we now know it, 1.3 grams is a very significant dose. Hydrophobia is a common symptom of Rabies.

“With the alcoholic extract made from the tops in the way I recommend the practitioner has only to feel his way, and increase the dose until he produces intoxication as the test of the remedy having taken effect”

“Of all powerful narcotics it is the safest to use with boldness and decision”

I fully concur

 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Perhaps rescheduling CBD is next?

FDA approves first drug comprised of an active ingredient derived from marijuana to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, in patients two years of age and older. This is the first FDA-approved drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from marijuana. It is also the first FDA approval of a drug for the treatment of patients with Dravet syndrome.

CBD is a chemical component of the Cannabis sativa plant, more commonly known as marijuana. However, CBD does not cause intoxication or euphoria (the “high”) that comes from tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

It is THC (and not CBD) that is the primary psychoactive component of marijuana.

“This approval serves as a reminder that advancing sound development programs that properly evaluate active ingredients contained in marijuana can lead to important medical therapies. And, the FDA is committed to this kind of careful scientific research and drug development,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “Controlled clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of a drug, along with careful review through the FDA’s drug approval process, is the most appropriate way to bring marijuana-derived treatments to patients. Because of the adequate and well-controlled clinical studies that supported this approval, prescribers can have confidence in the drug’s uniform strength and consistent delivery that support appropriate dosing needed for treating patients with these complex and serious epilepsy syndromes. We’ll continue to support rigorous scientific research on the potential medical uses of marijuana-derived products and work with product developers who are interested in bringing patients safe and effective, high quality products. But, at the same time, we are prepared to take action when we see the illegal marketing of CBD-containing products with serious, unproven medical claims. Marketing unapproved products, with uncertain dosages and formulations can keep patients from accessing appropriate, recognized therapies to treat serious and even fatal diseases.”

Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic condition that appears during the first year of life with frequent fever-related seizures (febrile seizures). Later, other types of seizures typically arise, including myoclonic seizures (involuntary muscle spasms). Additionally, status epilepticus, a potentially life-threatening state of continuous seizure activity requiring emergency medical care, may occur. Children with Dravet syndrome typically experience poor development of language and motor skills, hyperactivity and difficulty relating to others.

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome begins in childhood. It is characterized by multiple types of seizures. People with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome begin having frequent seizures in early childhood, usually between ages 3 and 5. More than three-quarters of affected individuals have tonic seizures, which cause the muscles to contract uncontrollably. Almost all children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome develop learning problems and intellectual disability. Many also have delayed development of motor skills such as sitting and crawling. Most people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome require help with usual activities of daily living.

“The difficult-to-control seizures that patients with Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome experience have a profound impact on these patients’ quality of life,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “In addition to another important treatment option for Lennox-Gastaut patients, this first-ever approval of a drug specifically for Dravet patients will provide a significant and needed improvement in the therapeutic approach to caring for people with this condition.”

Epidiolex’s effectiveness was studied in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials involving 516 patients with either Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or Dravet syndrome. Epidiolex, taken along with other medications, was shown to be effective in reducing the frequency of seizures when compared with placebo.

The most common side effects that occurred in Epidiolex-treated patients in the clinical trials were: sleepiness, sedation and lethargy; elevated liver enzymes; decreased appetite; diarrhea; rash; fatigue, malaise and weakness; insomnia, sleep disorder and poor quality sleep; and infections.

Epidiolex must be dispensed with a patient Medication Guide that describes important information about the drug’s uses and risks. As is true for all drugs that treat epilepsy, the most serious risks include thoughts about suicide, attempts to commit suicide, feelings of agitation, new or worsening depression, aggression and panic attacks. Epidiolex also caused liver injury, generally mild, but raising the possibility of rare, but more severe injury. More severe liver injury can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, anorexia, jaundice and/or dark urine.

Under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA), CBD is currently a Schedule I substance because it is a chemical component of the cannabis plant. In support of this application, the company conducted nonclinical and clinical studies to assess the abuse potential of CBD.

The FDA prepares and transmits, through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, a medical and scientific analysis of substances subject to scheduling, like CBD, and provides recommendations to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) regarding controls under the CSA. DEA is required to make a scheduling determination.

The FDA granted Priority Review designation for this application. Fast-Trackdesignation was granted for Dravet syndrome. Orphan Drug designation was granted for both the Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome indications.

The FDA granted approval of Epidiolex to GW Research Ltd.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
Cannabis has so many amazing medicinal properties, some of which are still unknown..
But when it comes to epilepsy, there is absolutley no arguement about its benifits..
Its unbelievable how well it works to give people life back...
Why its took so long to get to this point just annoys me..
It seems to work very well with parkinsons too from my experience..
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Perhaps rescheduling CBD is next?

FDA approves first drug comprised of an active ingredient derived from marijuana to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Epidiolex (cannabidiol) [CBD] oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, in patients two years of age and older. This is the first FDA-approved drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from marijuana. It is also the first FDA approval of a drug for the treatment of patients with Dravet syndrome.

CBD is a chemical component of the Cannabis sativa plant, more commonly known as marijuana. However, CBD does not cause intoxication or euphoria (the “high”) that comes from tetrahydrocannabinol (THC).

It is THC (and not CBD) that is the primary psychoactive component of marijuana.

“This approval serves as a reminder that advancing sound development programs that properly evaluate active ingredients contained in marijuana can lead to important medical therapies. And, the FDA is committed to this kind of careful scientific research and drug development,” said FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, M.D. “Controlled clinical trials testing the safety and efficacy of a drug, along with careful review through the FDA’s drug approval process, is the most appropriate way to bring marijuana-derived treatments to patients. Because of the adequate and well-controlled clinical studies that supported this approval, prescribers can have confidence in the drug’s uniform strength and consistent delivery that support appropriate dosing needed for treating patients with these complex and serious epilepsy syndromes. We’ll continue to support rigorous scientific research on the potential medical uses of marijuana-derived products and work with product developers who are interested in bringing patients safe and effective, high quality products. But, at the same time, we are prepared to take action when we see the illegal marketing of CBD-containing products with serious, unproven medical claims. Marketing unapproved products, with uncertain dosages and formulations can keep patients from accessing appropriate, recognized therapies to treat serious and even fatal diseases.”

Dravet syndrome is a rare genetic condition that appears during the first year of life with frequent fever-related seizures (febrile seizures). Later, other types of seizures typically arise, including myoclonic seizures (involuntary muscle spasms). Additionally, status epilepticus, a potentially life-threatening state of continuous seizure activity requiring emergency medical care, may occur. Children with Dravet syndrome typically experience poor development of language and motor skills, hyperactivity and difficulty relating to others.

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome begins in childhood. It is characterized by multiple types of seizures. People with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome begin having frequent seizures in early childhood, usually between ages 3 and 5. More than three-quarters of affected individuals have tonic seizures, which cause the muscles to contract uncontrollably. Almost all children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome develop learning problems and intellectual disability. Many also have delayed development of motor skills such as sitting and crawling. Most people with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome require help with usual activities of daily living.

“The difficult-to-control seizures that patients with Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome experience have a profound impact on these patients’ quality of life,” said Billy Dunn, M.D., director of the Division of Neurology Products in the FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. “In addition to another important treatment option for Lennox-Gastaut patients, this first-ever approval of a drug specifically for Dravet patients will provide a significant and needed improvement in the therapeutic approach to caring for people with this condition.”

Epidiolex’s effectiveness was studied in three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials involving 516 patients with either Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or Dravet syndrome. Epidiolex, taken along with other medications, was shown to be effective in reducing the frequency of seizures when compared with placebo.

The most common side effects that occurred in Epidiolex-treated patients in the clinical trials were: sleepiness, sedation and lethargy; elevated liver enzymes; decreased appetite; diarrhea; rash; fatigue, malaise and weakness; insomnia, sleep disorder and poor quality sleep; and infections.

Epidiolex must be dispensed with a patient Medication Guide that describes important information about the drug’s uses and risks. As is true for all drugs that treat epilepsy, the most serious risks include thoughts about suicide, attempts to commit suicide, feelings of agitation, new or worsening depression, aggression and panic attacks. Epidiolex also caused liver injury, generally mild, but raising the possibility of rare, but more severe injury. More severe liver injury can cause nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, fatigue, anorexia, jaundice and/or dark urine.

Under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA), CBD is currently a Schedule I substance because it is a chemical component of the cannabis plant. In support of this application, the company conducted nonclinical and clinical studies to assess the abuse potential of CBD.

The FDA prepares and transmits, through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, a medical and scientific analysis of substances subject to scheduling, like CBD, and provides recommendations to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) regarding controls under the CSA. DEA is required to make a scheduling determination.

The FDA granted Priority Review designation for this application. Fast-Trackdesignation was granted for Dravet syndrome. Orphan Drug designation was granted for both the Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome indications.

The FDA granted approval of Epidiolex to GW Research Ltd.

The FDA, an agency within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, protects the public health by assuring the safety, effectiveness, and security of human and veterinary drugs, vaccines and other biological products for human use, and medical devices. The agency also is responsible for the safety and security of our nation’s food supply, cosmetics, dietary supplements, products that give off electronic radiation, and for regulating tobacco products.

The key is that this is "derived" not synthesized. That is, it came out of a marijuana plant. Now, approved by the FDA but still a Schedule 1 drug by the DEA and by Fed law which means that they are stating it has no medical value whatsoever.

The double talk is out of control in DC.
 

unklmark68

Active Member
I'm an epileptic, I've been through about every med there is, My original diagnosis was an AVM malformation/front temporal lobe. I was given an 8-10 year life expectancy, Seizures got increasingly worse until an aneurysm showed up a around 8.5 years later. Surgery saved my life but seizures never went away, I tried meds/poison for awhile longer, until someone mentioned medical marijuana. I had smoked dirtweed for years strictly because of being broke all the time on disability. I switched to top shelf herb, and just did micro-doses with what I could afford. Within a couple months my seizures had dropped in half. I had a VNS stimulator/computer implanted, that with herb I'm down to 1-2 seizures a year, before medicating properly, I had 1-2 a month or more. Excuse my language, but Fuck Big Pharma and their Poison. My stomach is much better now, and since I started vaping only, 6 months ago, My lungs feel like they are healing. Marijuana is a Miracle Drug
It gave me my life back again!
 

Kellya86

Herb Gardener.....
I'm an epileptic, I've been through about every med there is, My original diagnosis was an AVM malformation/front temporal lobe. I was given an 8-10 year life expectancy, Seizures got increasingly worse until an aneurysm showed up a around 8.5 years later. Surgery saved my life but seizures never went away, I tried meds/poison for awhile longer, until someone mentioned medical marijuana. I had smoked dirtweed for years strictly because of being broke all the time on disability. I switched to top shelf herb, and just did micro-doses with what I could afford. Within a couple months my seizures had dropped in half. I had a VNS stimulator/computer implanted, that with herb I'm down to 1-2 seizures a year, before medicating properly, I had 1-2 a month or more. Excuse my language, but Fuck Big Pharma and their Poison. My stomach is much better now, and since I started vaping only, 6 months ago, My lungs feel like they are healing. Marijuana is a Miracle Drug
It gave me my life back again!

This is exactly the sort of thing im on about...
Im so happy you found something to improve your quality of life...
Do you happen to be in a legal area, or are you taking a risk just to live..???
 

unklmark68

Active Member
This is exactly the sort of thing im on about...
Im so happy you found something to improve your quality of life...
Do you happen to be in a legal area, or are you taking a risk just to live..???
I'm in N.C. so I'm taking the risk daily. Medicinal has passed the House and the vote is in stage 3 at the NC Senate . Vote has been stalled since Sessions became AG though...
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
I'm an epileptic, I've been through about every med there is, My original diagnosis was an AVM malformation/front temporal lobe. I was given an 8-10 year life expectancy, Seizures got increasingly worse until an aneurysm showed up a around 8.5 years later. Surgery saved my life but seizures never went away, I tried meds/poison for awhile longer, until someone mentioned medical marijuana. I had smoked dirtweed for years strictly because of being broke all the time on disability. I switched to top shelf herb, and just did micro-doses with what I could afford. Within a couple months my seizures had dropped in half. I had a VNS stimulator/computer implanted, that with herb I'm down to 1-2 seizures a year, before medicating properly, I had 1-2 a month or more. Excuse my language, but Fuck Big Pharma and their Poison. My stomach is much better now, and since I started vaping only, 6 months ago, My lungs feel like they are healing. Marijuana is a Miracle Drug
It gave me my life back again!
That's a great story and I'm so happy you are having a good outcome. Really wonderful and keep on trucking on, my friend :thumbsup::headbang:

Oh...and in addition to big Pharma...how about a big "fuck you" call out for Jeffey Sessions, yeah? He ain't my favorite guy, can you tell! haha
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Whole-Plant Marijuana ‘Entourage Effect’ Helps Patients More Than Purified CBD, Study Finds

Patients suffering from epilepsy experience better health outcomes—with fewer adverse side effects—when they use plant-based cannabidiol (CBD) extracts compared to “purified” CBD products, according to a new scientific review.

A team of Brazilian researchers conducted a meta-analysis of studies from 2013 to 2017 that have explored the therapeutic benefits of CBD for epilepsy patients. The results were published in the journal Frontiers In Neurology last week.

While the main purpose of the review was to determine the safety and efficacy of CBD for certain forms of epilepsy, the researchers also distinguished between CBD-rich cannabis extracts and purified CBD products, which contain only trace amounts of other cannabinoids, if any.

Consistent with a growing body of scientific research, the study found that CBD treatment reduces the frequency of seizures, even among patients with treatment-resistant forms of epilepsy. About two-thirds of patients included in studies under review had fewer seizures—and six out of 11 those studies “showed over 80 percent of the patients reporting improvement.”

But in the studies where patients received CBD-rich extracts, that improvement was even greater.
Seventy-one percent of patients treated with CBD-rich extracts reported improvements, compared to just 36 percent of patients who received purified CBD products.


The researchers didn’t expand on possible reasons for the difference; however, cannabis experts have long promoted a concept called the “entourage effect,” which refers to the cumulative effect that cannabis is believed to have when its many ingredients work together.

“CBD-rich extracts seem to present a better therapeutic profile than purified CBD, at least in this population of patients with refractory epilepsy,” the researchers wrote. “The roots of this difference is likely due to synergistic effects of CBD with other phytocompounds (aka Entourage effect), but this remains to be confirmed in controlled clinical studies.”

In other words, because purified CBD generally contains little to no other cannabinoids such as THC or cannabinol (CBN), these products hypothetically wouldn’t perform as effectively as plant-based CBD in epilepsy treatment.

This isn’t the first study to suggest that marijuana works better as a treatment option when a diverse range of its ingredients is present. There’s research going back to at least 1981 that seems to reinforce the theory.

The theory became especially of interest to scientists following the publication of a 2011 study in the British Journal of Pharmacology, however. That study looked at terpenes, compounds of cannabis that influence the flavor and smell of marijuana—and possibly, according to its findings, even the effects cannabis has on consumers.

As drug companies like GW Pharmaceuticals continue to advance products based on components of marijuana, the results of this and future studies on the entourage effect may help better inform patients about their options as they seek out cannabis therapies.

 

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