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Law Germany

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Angela Merkel's party mulls legalizing cannabis in Germany
Prominent members of the ruling Christian Democratic Union (CDU) have begun to openly discuss legalizing marijuana in Germany. The move would be a historic policy turn for the
conservative party.

Germany's center-right Christian Democratic Union (CDU) is openly considering a momentous u-turn in the party's attitude to the legalization of cannabis.

"Cannabis could be freed for personal use, of course with controlled production and distribution," CDU interior policy spokesman Marian Wendt told the RND network on Friday. "The resources freed in the police and judiciary should be used to fight the illegal trade."

Wendt's statement came after the German government's drug commissioner, Daniela Ludwig, also signaled a more liberal new drug policy in the conservative party.

Ludwig, of the CDU's Bavarian sister party, the Christian Social Union (CSU), told the Neue Osnabrücker Zeitung newspaper earlier this week, "We need to stop with the ideologically charged black-or-white debates, because we won't get any further."

Instead, the new drug commissioner said the focus of drug policy should be on practicality. "At the end of the day, what is the best way to protect the health of people, especially young people, and which path makes the most sense for the situation in this country?"

German drug czar Daniela Ludwig (privat)
Germany's new drug czar Daniela Ludwig has a more liberal take
Ludwig also said that the party had been "thinking about" legalization "for years." "Of course you don't get addicted from trying it once," she added. "That's exactly why we looked at different projects for controlled distribution."

Change of tack

This struck a markedly different tone to that of her predecessor, Marlene Mortler, also of the CSU, who last year said in a statement, "The constant debate about legalization is heading the wrong way. It suggests to young people especially that cannabis is not a dangerous substance — that is simply not true!"

At the moment, cannabis in Germany is only legal for strict medicinal use. The plant may only be grown, sold, owned, imported or exported with the permission of the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices. Seriously ill people can be prescribed cannabis-based drugs.

In practice, however, the state usually does not prosecute the possession of 6 grams or less, a limit agreed by state interior ministers last year.

Angela Merkel's party is the last of the major political parties in Germany that maintains a strictly prohibitive drug policy, against legalization policies laid out by the Social Democrats, the Greens, the Free Democrats, and the Left party.

Last year, official government figures said that some 4 million Germans use cannabis, with 17% of 18-25-year-olds saying they had used it in the past 12 months.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member

Germany Rejected Its Recreational Cannabis Bill


The people of New Zealand just voted down a measure to legalize cannabis through a referendum. New Jersey just legalized it recreationally also through its own referendum. Germany didn’t put the question to its people, but last month the government of Germany rejected its recreational cannabis bill.


A little about Germany and cannabis


As per the title, recreational marijuana is not legal in Germany. In fact, possessing it at all can garner a person up to five years in prison according to the German Federal Narcotics Act, though conversely, it’s not technically illegal to use it, since there is no stated law against it. If caught with small amounts, offenders are usually put in a program over anything more serious, at least for first-time offenders. The term ‘small amount’ is not very well defined, though, and can mean anywhere from about 6-15 grams depending on where in Germany the possession takes place. Plus, the amount is judged by quantity and potency over actual weight, meaning the THC content helps define the amount in the end.


Sale and supply crimes are predictably illegal, and offenders can receive up to about five years in prison. This sentence goes up from 1-15 years depending on the circumstances of the case. Cultivation on a personal level is also illegal and garners the same punishment as sale and supply crimes.


Germany rejected recreational cannabis



In terms of CBD, while Germany already had been permitting it, the recent decision of the CJEU (Court of Justice of the European Union) in the case of France vs the EU, makes it that much more clear. EU standard has now been found to trump local member state laws when it comes to the import and export of CBD between member states. As per EU standards, Germany does not allow more than .2% THC in CBD oil preparations.






Technically, the medical use of a cannabis drug has been legal since 1998 in Germany when dronabinol was rescheduled. It wasn’t until 2017, however, that Germany further legalized medicinal cannabis. As of 2017, new legislation opened the door for more disorders and sicknesses to be relevant for treatment.


What about Germany’s market?


The thing about Germany is that it already has one of the biggest cannabis markets in the EU, and even in the world, though right now it’s all a medicinal market. In 2019, for example, Germany was the biggest importer and exporter of cannabis oil in the EU. Though the country can’t compete just yet with the US in terms of imports – the US for 2019 imported approximately $893 million worth of cannabis oil making it the clear leader, Germany did get the #2 spot with $240 million worth of oil imported that year. When it comes to exports, Germany led the EU with about $230 million worth of cannabis oil exports, but that was only 4th place in the world. Topping the export list was China, sitting pretty with just under $1 billion worth of cannabis oil exports that year.


Cannabis oil is only part of it. Most of the legal cannabis world still revolves around dry flowers, and Germany just happens to have a massive cannabis flower market as well. And one that is only looking to grow and expand out more. In July, Germany released data on its medical cannabis imports for the first two quarters of the year. While Q1 showed an increase of 16%, Q2 showed a massive 32% increase, and this at the height of the Coronavirus pandemic measures being taken all over the world. To give an idea of what this means via comparison, in 2018, Germany imported about 3.1 tons of cannabis flowers, this was increased to 6.7 tons in 2019, and it looks like it will go much higher than that by the end of 2020. During this time, Germany had such an issue with supply problems that it requested extra cannabis flowers from the Netherlands to help close the gap. Part of the reason for the need for more medical cannabis is simply the increasing number of Germans receiving it as treatment. As of June 2019, about 60,000 Germans were registered with the medical marijuana program in the country, and that number is sure to be way higher by now.


parliament vote



Up until recently, Canada and the Netherlands were Germany’s two biggest and main suppliers of cannabis flowers. However, more recently, it looks like Germany has received flowers from Uruguay (through a secretive back-door move using Portugal to import), and Spain via Linneo, a Spanish cannabis producer. Canada, however, is still the main importer to Germany, with several new companies opening shop in Germany, or planning new exports to the country. To give an idea of how out-of-whack prices have gotten in Germany, consider that the current retail price of a gram of cannabis is about €20. Then consider that this is a medical price, not even a recreational price.


What’s the deal with recreational?


Everything so far should give some idea of how big Germany’s cannabis market is, and how quickly it’s growing. As the biggest market in the EU, it’s not that surprising that the question of a recreational legalization would come up, since, obviously, Germany is pretty okay with use of the plant. However, this sentiment did not come through as a recreational legalization as last month Germany rejected its recreational cannabis bill.


Germany has six main political parties. The Left (holds 69 seats and is in favor of legalizing), the Social Democratic Party of Germany (about 152 seats, technically in favor of legalization, but voted with coalition partner instead – the Union, which includes the Christian Democrats led by Angela Merkel), the Union (two parties making up 264 seats, against legalization), the Greens (67 seats, and in support of legalization), the Free Democratic Party (holds 80 seats, but did not vote on the measure), and Alternative for Germany (somewhere in the neighborhood of 89-94 seats, and against legalization).


On October 29th, the proposed bill for an adult-use recreational cannabis market in Germany was firmly rejected in parliament, despite having plenty of support from different factions of Germany’s parliament. One of the big reasons for this is the coalition between the Union and the Social Democratic Party of Germany. The Union is itself is a coalition between the Christian Democratic Union of Germany (led by Angela Merkel) and the Christian Social Union in Bavaria. The Social Democratic Party of Germany, which though technically is in favor of cannabis reform, tends to vote with its coalition partner, the Union. Together they hold enough seats that any initiative will fail without at least some of their support. In this way, by having the two parties paired together, Germany rejected its recreational cannabis bill squarely.


recreational marijuana



In a way, the coalition is a strange one. The Union, is known as a center-right party associated with Christian movements. The Social Democratic party is center-left. Technically, the two groups have very different stances, and while they might overlap on some issues, they actually seem quite at odds when it comes to cannabis, making their vote together a bit of a headscratcher. Nevertheless, by being joined together, the Social Democrats voted with the Union making for an unbeatable force.


What’s next for Germany?


In the wake of the fact that Germany rejected its recreational cannabis bill, it’s hard to imagine what the next step will be. Unlike with a country like New Zealand, it was not the people of the country who voted the measure down, but rather, parliament on its own. This means the people of Germany are not necessarily on board with this decision, and that could mean new measures arising in the near future. It is, after all, already one of the biggest cannabis markets in the world. The step to legalization gets smaller and smaller as Germany gets more and more saturated with cannabis. Personally, I expect something will happen very soon that will tip the balance in the other direction.
 

im not a robot

Well-Known Member


chances are not bad the next german elections could have a positive impact on legalisation efforts in germany. if you can vote in germany this coming weekend, you really should: if the centre-right CDU (main opponent of legalisation) is voted out of government this time, it looks la lot more likely some kind of progress can happen - all other parties likely to form a new government have at least some variation on legalisation efforts / or support of trial projects in their current program.

and if you should feel extra-motivated: der deutsche hanfverband has started a call to write to your local candidates for the bundestag to push interest in this matter across partisan lines - they have pre-formulated letters and a handy search engine to get the contact details of your local representatives. just copy / paste & send. https://hanfverband.de/zeit-fuer-legalisierung

Is cannabis legalization on horizon in Germany? Not so fast, experts say


Canadian cannabis industry executives are paying close attention to Germany’s upcoming election, where pro-cannabis parties are in a good position to unseat the political union that has long opposed any form of recreational legalization.

However, experts are pouring cold water on any expectations of meaningful cannabis reform in the near future, as questions remain over the makeup of the next coalition government and where cannabis law reform would sit on the list of priorities.

The election is Sept. 26.

“If there would be a coalition of pro-cannabis parties, it is unlikely that a recreational cannabis law would be the highest priority,” Nikolaas Faes, Paris-based senior analyst for Bryan, Garnier & Co., wrote in a research note.

“More likely it could well be 2024 before a recreational cannabis law is passed – and coming in effect in 2025 – but in the meantime all the parties concerned, seem to be willing to allow cities to establish model projects.”

Some cannabis industry executives, such as Canada-based Tilray CEO Irwin Simon, have claimed to have “intel” suggesting cannabis could be legalized this year, but experts say there is no chance of that happening.

In the meantime, Germany’s medical market continues to grow.

Faes pegs the medical market there at about 300 million euros ($354 million), making it the second-biggest federally regulated medical market in the world, behind Canada.

Germany is on pace to become the biggest fully legal medical market in the world by next year.

Oliver Zugel, founder and CEO of Bogota, Colombia-based FoliuMed Holdings, told MJBizDaily that most of the political parties in Germany are considering adult-use trials or legalization “in some shape or form.”

But Zugel, who does business in Germany, said the likeliest timeline is for recreational cannabis trials to be launched in major cities by 2026, the end of the next legislative period.

‘Big differences’

Even if Germans elect a majority of Bundestag representatives this month who favor of legalization, that doesn’t mean legalization is guaranteed in the next legislative period, Alfredo Pascual, vice president of investment analysis at Seed Innovations, told MJBizDaily.

Last year, for instance, the German federal parliament rejected a bill to legalize a “strictly controlled” adult-use cannabis market, even though a majority of the Bundestag members belonged to a political party favoring some type of reform.

The latest polls indicate the next Bundestag will likely have about two-thirds of members of parliament representing parties in favor of some type of legalization while the rest will represent parties favoring the status quo.

“The parties that support legalization have big differences among each other,” said Pascual, a former MJBizDaily journalist.

“On some (non-cannabis) topics, they are diametrically opposed. And even when it comes to (cannabis) legalization, it could mean different things to different parties which are in favor of it.”

The key, experts say, is the composition of the coalition government that will be formed after the election results are known.

And that is where most of the uncertainty lies.

“As of now, there are several possible and realistic combinations of parties that could form the next government coalition representing at least 50% of the votes. The majority of these possible combinations would include CDU/CSU, a political force which largely opposes legalization,” Pascual said.

“If the future government coalition includes CDU/CSU, the chances of legalization will largely depend on whether CDU/CSU will have a leading role in that coalition and if and how strong the other coalition parties will negotiate with CDU/CSU on this issue.

“It could be that cannabis isn’t a priority for anyone, as other topics such as climate change have much more importance in the public debate.”

If Germany does pursue legalization, the smart money is on a limited “trial” being rolled out, rather than a Canadian-style system of legalizing marijuana in one shot.

But that could push a fully regulated marijuana market 5-10 years out – or more.

Pascual said a trial is more likely because:

  • There’s much less political risk in doing a limited trial and calling it a scientific experiment than doing full legalization all at once.
  • Similar pilot experiments have already been approved and are starting in neighboring Netherlands and Switzerland, which makes it more palatable for Germans.
  • The parties that support legalization in Germany disagree on how to do it.
  • The party currently leading in the polls, SPD, favors municipal adult-use cannabis experiments but hasn’t shown much support for a fully legalized market right away.
“In the meantime, all the parties concerned seem to be willing to allow cities to establish model projects,” said Faes of Bryan, Garnier & Co.

The ruling CDU/CSU union platform says it “rejects the legalization of illegal drugs.”

However, some senior party members like Erwin Rüddel are among those who have softened their stance, leaving the door open to a potential compromise over a pilot program for regulated marijuana sales.

Switzerland example

If Germany does pursue a pilot recreational cannabis program, it need look no further than Switzerland, where adult-use cannabis experiments are set to get underway next year in some cities, including Zurich.

Switzerland is embarking on a experiment allowing for a fully regulated adult-use cannabis supply chain.

Gavin George, director of research and intellectual property at Switzerland-based genetics breeding company Puregene AG, said Switzerland’s trial system could be a useful model to follow for other European nations considering cannabis law reform.

“We think that Switzerland has taken a very pragmatic approach. The problem with the cannabis industry is there is so much information out there, and very little of it is produced scientifically,” he said in a phone interview.

“The Swiss government is taking a good approach in trying to involve companies that are here locally, will be supplying the market and generating data.”

“We’re running at a million miles an hour to make sure that we’re there and the market is rolled out correctly. We want it to be sustainable, but we also want it to be safe.”
 
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im not a robot

Well-Known Member
yay!
i have not yet found an english site covering this, i think this literally just made the news in the last hour, but it looks like we are indeed going to legalise!
!!


edit:
yay may be a little premature as legislation will still have to pass both houses of parliament, and the conservatives, while no longer in government, still hold a majority in the bundesrat. timing and public opinion (hovering around 50/50 atm i think) will be critical

here is an english sum up from marijuanamoment.net (?)

germany-marijuana.jpg



Party leaders in Germany’s incoming government coalition have reached an agreement to legalize marijuana nationwide.
The legalization legislation is expected to be introduced during the upcoming legislative session. It will also provide broader drug harm reduction services and restrict advertising of tobacco and alcohol, along with cannabis.
As it stands, personal possession of marijuana is decriminalized in Germany, and there is a medical cannabis program in place. But this forthcoming proposal would seek to establish a regulated market for adult-use marijuana.


The governing coalition—comprised of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), the Free Democratic Party (FDP) and the Greens—said that it will be “introducing the controlled distribution of cannabis to adults for recreational purposes in licensed shops,” according to a translation of a multi-party working group report first noted by Funke Media and circulated by Der Spiegel.
The so-called “traffic light coalition” is making the case that regulating marijuana sales will help drive out the illicit market. That will be revisited four years post-implementation, when a review of the social impact of the reform will be required.
And while the lawmakers emphasized that the objective of the reform is not to boost tax revenue for the country, FDP said in its election manifesto that taxing cannabis like cigarettes could generate €1 billion annually.


The new report, which was agreed to by the coalition’s working group on health and care, also discusses how the legislation would promote harm reduction, in part by allowing drug-checking services where people could have illicit substances tested for contaminants and other harmful products.
There will also be provisions related to advertising, with the intent being to restrict the promotion of marijuana, tobacco and alcohol to deter youth use, Der Spiegel reported.
“We measure regulations again and again against new scientific findings and align measures for health protection,” the report states.
Bloomberg noted earlier this month that the parties were nearing a deal on the issue.
This reform has been a long time coming in Germany. It was 2017 when members of the Christian Democratic Union and its ally the Christian Social Union entered into talks with Free Democrats and Greens about advancing legalization.
Police unions in Germany have come out against plans to legalize marijuana.
In neighboring Luxembourg, the ministers of justice and homeland security last month unveiled a legalization proposal, which will still require a vote in the Parliament but is expected to pass. For now, the country is focusing on legalization within a home setting. Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal in early 2022, and the ruling parties are friendly to the reform.
If either Germany or Luxembourg moves ahead and enacts the reform, they would be the first in Europe to do so. Canada and Uruguay have already legalized recreational cannabis.
In North America, meanwhile, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee approved a bill in September to legalize marijuana and promote social equity. Senate leadership is also finalizing a comprehensive reform proposal. Several Republican members of Congress introduced a bill on Monday to federally legalize and tax marijuana.
In Mexico, the legislature expected to vote on a bill to regulate cannabis within weeks, a top senator recently said. That comes after the Supreme Court invalidated prohibition on constitutional grounds.
 
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momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
i have not yet found an english site covering this, i think this literally just made the news in the last hour, but it looks like we are indeed going to legalise!
!!
Here you go! Congratulations! :smile:

Germany Set To Legalize Marijuana Nationwide After Major Parties Reach Agreement


Party leaders in Germany’s incoming government coalition have reached an agreement to legalize marijuana nationwide.

The legalization legislation is expected to be introduced during the upcoming legislative session. It will also provide broader drug harm reduction services and restrict advertising of tobacco and alcohol, along with cannabis.

As it stands, personal possession of marijuana is decriminalized in Germany, and there is a medical cannabis program in place. But this forthcoming proposal would seek to establish a regulated market for adult-use marijuana.



The governing coalition—comprised of the Social Democratic Party of Germany (SPD), the Free Democratic Party (FDP) and the Greens—said that it will be “introducing the controlled distribution of cannabis to adults for recreational purposes in licensed shops,” according to a translation of a multi-party working group report first noted by Funke Media and circulated by Der Spiegel.

The so-called “traffic light coalition” is making the case that regulating marijuana sales will help drive out the illicit market. That will be revisited four years post-implementation, when a review of the social impact of the reform will be required.

And while the lawmakers emphasized that the objective of the reform is not to boost tax revenue for the country, FDP said in its election manifesto that taxing cannabis like cigarettes could generate €1 billion annually.



The new report, which was agreed to by the coalition’s working group on health and care, also discusses how the legislation would promote harm reduction, in part by allowing drug-checking services where people could have illicit substances tested for contaminants and other harmful products.

There will also be provisions related to advertising, with the intent being to restrict the promotion of marijuana, tobacco and alcohol to deter youth use, Der Spiegel reported.

“We measure regulations again and again against new scientific findings and align measures for health protection,” the report states.

Bloomberg noted earlier this month that the parties were nearing a deal on the issue.

This reform has been a long time coming in Germany. It was 2017 when members of the Christian Democratic Union and its ally the Christian Social Union entered into talks with Free Democrats and Greens about advancing legalization.

Police unions in Germany have come out against plans to legalize marijuana.

In neighboring Luxembourg, the ministers of justice and homeland security last month unveiled a legalization proposal, which will still require a vote in the Parliament but is expected to pass. For now, the country is focusing on legalization within a home setting. Parliament is expected to vote on the proposal in early 2022, and the ruling parties are friendly to the reform.

If either Germany or Luxembourg moves ahead and enacts the reform, they would be the first in Europe to do so. Canada and Uruguay have already legalized recreational cannabis.

In North America, meanwhile, the U.S. House Judiciary Committee approved a bill in September to legalize marijuana and promote social equity. Senate leadership is also finalizing a comprehensive reform proposal. Several Republican members of Congress introduced a bill on Monday to federally legalize and tax marijuana.

In Mexico, the legislature expected to vote on a bill to regulate cannabis within weeks, a top senator recently said. That comes after the Supreme Court invalidated prohibition on constitutional grounds.
 

im not a robot

Well-Known Member
i should add that this news is now regarded as a leak, & not official yet. the coalition contract is due to be published sometime next week, and hopefully it will contain what is outlined above. nothing has yet been said regarding the cultivation of plants for personal use - and i really hope this will be included.

but once all this would be made into legislation and passed in the bundestag (our first house of parliament), it will likely still need approval of the bundesrat (second house of parliament, representatives of the federal states), which could be difficult with the current distribution of power there. timing will be important, as we have a lot of elections for the federal states coming up, and if, hopefully, the conservatives loose enough representation in the bundesrat, this could and should all work out. fingers crossed. for the next couple years i guess.
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member

Germany to legalize recreational cannabis sales, incoming coalition pledges​


By Matt Lamers, International Editor
November 24, 2021
SHARE
Image of Reichstag building in Berlin.

The three parties expected to form the next government in Germany have agreed to regulate the distribution and sale of recreational cannabis, according to a coalition agreement released Wednesday.
Europe’s largest economy taking a step toward marijuana legalization and regulation is being viewed as a significant achievement by social groups that have long advocated for an end to cannabis prohibition.
Businesses also are hoping to profit from sales of the drug under the watchful eye of government regulators.
However, the document contained little in the way of detail.
“We are introducing the controlled distribution of cannabis to adults for consumption purposes in licensed shops. This controls the quality, prevents the transfer of contaminated substances and guarantees the protection of minors,” according to a small section on “Drug Policy” that is part of the 177-page agreement.
It’s unclear where cannabis reform ranks among the coalition’s long list of promises.
The parties also have said they plan to review the law after four years to weigh its social impact.
The three-party coalition is poised to take power from the current conservative government as early as December, also pending ratification of the agreement.
‘Almost no details’
Alfredo Pascual, vice president of investment analysis at Seed Innovations, told MJBizDaily that the agreement is confirmation the incoming government intends to legalize adult-use cannabis.
“But the timeline until a recreational market will be established is largely unpredictable at the moment,” Pascual said.
“With almost no details provided in the coalition agreement document, ‘legalization’ could end up meaning many different things.”
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Pascual noted that an actual legalization bill still needs to be drafted and approved.
Any law and regulations, yet to be drafted, would carve out an addressable adult-use marijuana market for businesses.
Final approval could face resistance by the Bundesrat, which represents the nation’s 16 federated states at the federal level.
The Bundesrat, the second legislative chamber that acts as counterweight to the Bundestag federal parliament, will continue to be controlled by the conservative party of outgoing Chancellor Angela Merkel for at least the next year or two, “maybe longer depending on future local elections results,” said Pascual, a former MJBizDaily journalist.
“There are also international implications, possibly challenges, at the EU and U.N. level that incoming policymakers will have to consider when they go through the actual legalization process.”
The European Union reference is to the Council Framework Decision 2004/757/JHA, and the United Nations reference is to the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.
The agreement between the three parties is available here (in German).
Luxembourg update
Also Wednesday, neighboring Luxembourg released more details about its upcoming cannabis legalization and decriminalization.
Luxembourg has backpaddled on its earlier pledge to establish a regulated market for the sale of adult-use cannabis.
The latest plan will permit the cultivation of up to four plants per household, but sales will not be allowed.
The small country also plans to give a mandate to the Ministry of Justice to prepare a draft bill, in cooperation with five other ministries and judicial authorities.
Possession in public will be allowed so long as it doesn’t exceed 3 grams, per the proposed rules, but consumption in public will not be permitted.
That might portend a heavily bureaucratic system that leaves almost no room for profit by private enterprise.
Luxembourg’s latest announcement is available here.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

It’s Official: New Ruling German Coalition to Legalize Recreational Cannabis Use

The news has been rumbling for a week after a German language magazine first reported the news. Now it is official. Germany will be legalizing recreational use cannabis as early as 2022.

Even the most die-hard “medical only” German voices within the cannabis industry have been posting the news all over their social media including LinkedIn for the past week, even before the news was official. But as of Wednesday, that has changed, officially. The new so-called “Traffic Light Coalition” will indeed be legalizing recreational use cannabis with a bill to do so introduced in the German Bundestag next year.

For those who have fought for the same, in the trenches, for years if not decades, it is an exciting moment. It is also electrifying the industry, which now has over 100 medical cannabis specialty distribution licenses, a growing patient base (estimated 100,000 at this point), and a topic that just will not quit. Particularly as the Swiss (in part, a German language country) are doing the same thing. This is particularly momentous given the timing. Germany might even beat Luxembourg into the recreational discussion within the European Union.

That said, no matter how exciting, the devil, as always, is in the details. How much, what exactly, and how it will be implemented is all still up in the air. Cannabis is still not actually decriminalized, and there are all sorts of strange pieces of case law and to be changed statutes still very much in the room.


What Is Known So Far​

The reason this is such a big deal is that the announcement comes as the three parties who won the most votes in the federal election in September have sealed the deal to work together with a common plank that includes cannabis reform (along with phasing out coal by 2030 while also having at least 15 million electric cars on the road). After that, it is just a matter of crafting the legislation and introducing it into the German parliament. Unlike the U.S., where there have been multiple, unsuccessful attempts to pass a federal legalization bill, this one is almost guaranteed to pass. The Germans are funny like that.

Here is what is actually official. In a statement released by the SDP, Greens and FDP, this is what the coalition plans to do. “We are introducing the controlled supply of cannabis to adults for consumption in licensed stores. This controls the quality [of marijuana], prevents the transfer of contaminated substances and guarantees the protection of minors.”

The government will review the experiment in four years to determine the impact (including economically and socially). That said, there is little chance such a forward step would be rolled back.

Issues And Problems Along the Way​

It is not like this is going to be smooth sailing. There are a few major issues to address. Chief among those is how to amend the country’s federal narcotics law. Cannabis, including CBD, is considered a narcotic. This is already out of step with EU policy on the same (with a pending lawsuit to change that). Regardless, add THC to the mix, and there is going to be some fancy footwork and legal eagling to make the change happen not only in the new legislation, but that which governs and regulates the medical variety.

German Impact​

There is little doubt that Germany’s move to recreational cannabis will forward the debate across Europe—and potentially in the same timeframe as it has impacted the medical conversation. Just four years ago, the concept of using medical cannabis even for pain relief was a very strange, often socially unacceptable topic. Today, there are about 100,000 German patients.

The Germans may not have arrived yet, but they are certainly on the way.


This is absolutely a Colorado if not Canadian tipping point. However, it may also be one that is not just about Germany, or even Europe, but an international and global one.

Coming as it is on the international news of Mexico implementing recreational reform by year’s end and Italians potentially having the ability to vote on legalizing personal possession and home grow as of next spring, not to mention both Luxembourg and Switzerland definitely moving ahead with their own recreational markets, it is clear that full and final cannabis reform is now a mainstream topic and goal on a federal level of many countries.

This will also, undoubtedly spur on the debate in the U.S. If Germany can do this, less than four years after federal legalization of its medical market, what is the U.S. waiting for? Or for that matter China? In the latter case, with a corporate real estate market melting down, perhaps finally, and on a global scale, cannabis will be considered a great if not green and global investment.

In the meantime, the last days of Prohibition have clearly arrived and on a global level.
 

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