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Meds SAFETY ALERT!!

BD9

Leaf Dawg
Marijuana products recalled in Michigan

http://www.abc57.com/news/marijuana-products-recalled-in-michigan


The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) has issued two health and safety advisories because of the sale of marijuana that failed laboratory testing.

The following two businesses carry products affected by the recall.

Patients or caregivers who have affected medical marijuana products should return them to the store where they were purchased for proper disposal.

Products sold between 12/18/2018 and 1/3/2019 at The Green Mile Detroit, located at 6650 E. Eight Mile Road in Detroit, are affected by the recall, including:

  • Gelato
1A405010000076E000000140

Failed for total yeast and mold.

  • Superman OG
1A405010000076E000000141

Failed for chemical residue.

  • Mimosa
1A405010000076E000000125

Failed for bile-tolerant gram-negative bacteria and total coliforms.

  • Girl Scout Cookies
1A405010000076E000000126

Failed for total yeast and mold.



Products sold between 12/12/2018 and 12/29/2019 at Compassionate Care by Design, located at 401 N. Sage Street in Kalamazoo, are affected by the recall, including:

  • Critical Cali
1A4040100000515000000014



  • GMO
1A4040100000515000000015



  • Silver Haze
1A4040100000515000000016



  • GSC
1A4040100000515000000017



  • Critical Kush
1A4040100000515000000018



  • Blueberry
    1A4040100000515000000019


  • Skunk #1
1A4040100000515000000020



  • Chunk D
1A4040100000515000000021



  • Amnesia Lemon Kush
1A4040100000515000000022



  • Special Kush
1A4040100000515000000023



  • Purple Punch
1A4040100000515000000024
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
Marijuana products recalled in Michigan

http://www.abc57.com/news/marijuana-products-recalled-in-michigan


The Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs (LARA) has issued two health and safety advisories because of the sale of marijuana that failed laboratory testing.

The following two businesses carry products affected by the recall.

Patients or caregivers who have affected medical marijuana products should return them to the store where they were purchased for proper disposal.

Products sold between 12/18/2018 and 1/3/2019 at The Green Mile Detroit, located at 6650 E. Eight Mile Road in Detroit, are affected by the recall, including:

  • Gelato
1A405010000076E000000140

Failed for total yeast and mold.

  • Superman OG
1A405010000076E000000141

Failed for chemical residue.

  • Mimosa
1A405010000076E000000125

Failed for bile-tolerant gram-negative bacteria and total coliforms.

  • Girl Scout Cookies
1A405010000076E000000126

Failed for total yeast and mold.



Products sold between 12/12/2018 and 12/29/2019 at Compassionate Care by Design, located at 401 N. Sage Street in Kalamazoo, are affected by the recall, including:

  • Critical Cali
1A4040100000515000000014



  • GMO
1A4040100000515000000015



  • Silver Haze
1A4040100000515000000016



  • GSC
1A4040100000515000000017



  • Critical Kush
1A4040100000515000000018



  • Blueberry
    1A4040100000515000000019


  • Skunk #1
1A4040100000515000000020



  • Chunk D
1A4040100000515000000021



  • Amnesia Lemon Kush
1A4040100000515000000022



  • Special Kush
1A4040100000515000000023



  • Purple Punch
1A4040100000515000000024

This was bound to happen once testing started. Same thing happened in Cali after testing started. It might take a few rejections for the grow ops to get their shit together. All in all it says testing works
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
I've renamed this thread to cover all safety alerts that the community may need to see.

Cannabis-lookalike found in Ontario contains carfentanil

may27_part02_08-798x418.jpg
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
I came across this article at rxleaf.com and wanted to share. I only have permission to link the article (can't copy and paste)....

Dank Vapes: Bad Cartridge Nearly Kills Man

Counterfeit Dank Vapes (and others) are sending young people to hospital with severely damaged lungs.....

There is a big push now on vaping, but I doubt people understand it's ejuice that's the real problem not those that vape unadulterated products.

I just hope we don't suffer because of other people's problems.
 

elykpeace

exVASted
Dispensarys are still using Mct oil in vape carts. Bud tender told me it makes it smoother to hit and it's for greater bioavailability... Pretty sure you shouldn't breath coconut oil in. Even one dispensary issues vitamin e.. That and plant based terpenes aren't frowned upon. I want cannabis oil. All that other stuff makes my nose bleed.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Dispensarys are still using Mct oil in vape carts. Bud tender told me it makes it smoother to hit and it's for greater bioavailability... Pretty sure you shouldn't breath coconut oil in. Even one dispensary issues vitamin e.. That and plant based terpenes aren't frowned upon. I want cannabis oil. All that other stuff makes my nose bleed.
Vaping coconut oil can cause lipid pneumonia....

There is a big push now on vaping, but I doubt people understand it's ejuice that's the real problem not those that vape unadulterated products.

I just hope we don't suffer because of other people's problems.
True... but this article was in regard to counterfeit cannabis oil cartridges that were sold on the street.

I've had an experience buying a vape cartridge at a dispensary that was made by a well known cartridge maker; Platinum Vapes... and that cartridge contained coconut oil. It was the carrier oil used for all their cartridge products. It's made me very leary of any cartridge purchased... there's been no guarantee that they've used safe products to thin their oil. Hopefully with the new testing laws here in Michigan these cartridges will be safer in the future.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Vaping Sicknesses Rising: 153 Cases Reported in 16 States



Image
CreditCreditRichard Vogel/Associated Press

WASHINGTON — Sixteen states have now reported 153 cases of serious, vaping-related respiratory illnesses in the past two months, and many of the patients are teenagers or young adults.

In a statement on Wednesday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said that all of the cases occurred in people who acknowledged vaping either nicotine or tetrahydrocannabinol, known as THC, the high-inducing chemical in marijuana.

Federal and state officials say that they are mystified as to what is causing the illnesses, but that it does not appear that an infectious disease is responsible. No one product or device is common among the cases, the agency said. It also was unclear whether a contaminant in a used cartridge or a home-brewed concoction of vaping liquids contributed to some of the ailments.

The patients, most of whom were adolescents or young adults, were admitted to hospitals with difficulty breathing. Many also reported chest pain, vomiting and fatigue.

The most seriously ill patients had serious lung damage that required treatment with oxygen and days on a ventilator. Some are expected to have permanent lung damage. Some severe cases were earlier reported in Wisconsin, Minnesota, Illinois and California.

In an email, the C.D.C. said that while more study was needed, vaping either cannabis or nicotine could be dangerous.

“E-cigarettes are still fairly new, and scientists are still learning about their long-term health effects,” said Brian King, deputy director for research translation in the agency’s smoking and health office. “Adverse respiratory effects associated with e-cigarette use could be the result of a variety of factors, including intended and unintended constituents of these products.”Mr. King said numerous ingredients in e-cigarette aerosol could harm the lungs, including ultrafine particles that could be inhaled deeply, heavy metals like lead, volatile organic compounds and cancer-causing agents.The C.D.C. urged doctors to report suspected cases to their state health agencies. The Food and Drug Administration is also collecting information about illnesses related to e-cigarettes and vaping.

“Oftentimes people are vaping both nicotine and the THC products, so it’s unclear which may be responsible,” said Dr. Michael Lynch, medical director of the poison center at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center. “Probably this has been happening occasionally and we haven’t been aware of it, because the association with vaping wasn’t necessarily made. Now people are on the lookout, which is good, because we want to make sure we have an understanding of how prevalent an issue this is.”
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
About a year ago I became interested in the different flavored vape cartridges. Some had awesome flavor while others tasted terrible. Some brands that I tried I noticed I was getting one cold after another then a nasal infection which I don’t normally get. I have a drawer with slightly used carts, I will probably throw them away. Probably not fit for human consumption. In WA state everything is tested so these concentrates passed the analytical testing process. My body told me they weren’t good for me.

I had settled on a concentrate that works and most important doesn’t cause any side effects that I notice. I chose not use the carts for safety reasons. I’m curious why a lot of the lung problems mostly have been in just a few states? I wonder that might get worse? It’s a scary thing. Why mostly young people? Plenty older folks use concentrates with vaporizers.
 
Last edited:

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Contaminants? Really? No shit, Sherlock. After days of breathless reporting, it finally occurred to someone to try to correlate the illnesses with what they are vaping.....and in all instances found, it was NEVER a tested, regulated, med program cart.

Direct quote from the state of Maryland's cannabis commission issued yesterday regarding cases of vape related acute lung illness from vape carts"

"At this time, none of the reported cases involve Maryland medical cannabis patients

It finally occurred to someone that people have been inhaling nicotine and THC for thousands of years so....maybe....just maybe....its adulterants in illegal, boot leg, POS, carts sold by total fucking scumbags.

Now, fucking Dank Vape....which isn't even a cart company....they seem to print boxes for counterfeiters under that brand name....seem to be highly prevalent in these cases of illness.

Check it out


Yeah...and I don't do bathtub gin or crystal meth brewed by the Outlaws in a Motel 6 either. FFS.




As vaping-related lung illnesses spike, investigators eye contaminants

State and federal health authorities are focusing on the role of contaminants or counterfeit substances as a likely cause of vaping-related lung illnesses — now up to 354 possible cases in 29 states, nearly double the number reported to be under investigation last week, The Washington Post has learned.

Officials are narrowing the possible culprits to adulterants in vaping products purported to have THC, the component in marijuana that makes users high, as well as adulterants in nicotine vaping products.

The sudden onset of these mysterious illnesses and the patients’ severe and distinctive symptoms have led investigators to focus on contaminants, rather than standard vaping products that have been in wide use for many years.

The investigation is “starting to point to what solvents are being used, and that can vary a lot” — especially in counterfeit or black-market products, including potentially mislabeled solvents that consumers buy themselves to make do-it-yourself “home brews,” said an official at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which is heading the investigation.

The CDC and Food and Drug Administration issued a statement Friday morning warning that “anyone who does use e-cigarette products should not buy these products off the street (e.g., e-cigarette products with THC or other cannabinoids) and should not modify e-cigarette products or add any substances to these products that are not intended by the manufacturer.”

Vaping refers to the increasingly popular practice of inhaling vapor from an e-cigarette device, which frequently involves heating a liquid that can contain nicotine, marijuana or other drugs. Those active ingredients are delivered in solvents.


The national health alert about the illnesses — a sign of growing urgency about a health threat that has claimed one life, while hospitalizing scores of others — cautions that officials are a long way from understanding what exactly is making so many people sick. The victims report vaping different products, purchased in different places and used for different lengths of time. Many of those who have gotten ill say they have vaped products containing marijuana, but some also used traditional nicotine e-cigarettes. Some report using both.

The last week’s dramatic increase in reported cases is probably the result of increased awareness, said the CDC official. The official, who was not authorized to speak on the record, predicted that state officials will eliminate some of the unconfirmed cases.

In the meantime, federal and state officials are urging the millions of Americans who use e-cigarettes to stop vaping until the cause of the illnesses is identified. They have suggested that those using e-cigarettes quit smoking conventional cigarettes and contact their doctors about alternatives, such as patches or nicotine gums.

Some of those warnings have drawn criticism from both industry and health groups for being overly alarmist and broad about which products might be dangerous.

“People need to stop using these illicit THC products now — and it’s the CDC’s responsibility to say what we do know,” said Michael Siegel, a professor of community health services at Boston University, who believes that e-cigarettes can be helpful to those trying to quit smoking.

“Yes, there are unknowns. Yes, there may be other products implicated as well. But a large number [of confirmed cases] seem to involve THC oils purchased from ‘pop-up shops,’ ” he said, referring to unlicensed shops that move frequently, advertise by word of mouth and often fail to follow safety regulations.

The complex investigation has also been hobbled by the patchwork of state and federal regulatory authorities involved and the sheer number and kinds of businesses, legal and illicit, selling vaping products. Nicotine vaping products are lightly regulated in the United States, although tougher rules are due to kick in over the next year. Yet e-cigarette use has surged, especially among teens and young adults who have embraced the sleek, high-nicotine model of Juul, the leading brand.

A growing number of Americans are also vaping marijuana, which is legal in some states but prohibited under federal law.

Some marijuana vaping devices, such as vape pens, are a fairly recent phenomena and among the most popular devices for vaping cannabis. The vape pens are a potential target for black-market sellers because they’re cheap and easy to fill with counterfeit substances, according to officials and industry sources.

Former FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb, a harsh critic of San Francisco-based Juul, said he believes it’s unlikely that Juul — or other large national e-cigarette companies — are associated with the recent cases because the illnesses appeared to have developed suddenly and do not appear to be spread evenly across the nation.

Traditional vaping products could cause chronic problems, Gottlieb said, but these patients have acute illnesses.

“What’s likely causing the harm is something that they are putting in to make it easy or cheap to mix,” he added.

Some state health officials and clinicians are increasingly focused on contaminants in THC products.

In a conference call Thursday, Utah health officials told physicians the state department is focusing on THC products, said one doctor who took part in the call. The physician spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak for the health department. Utah has reported at least 21 possible cases in recent weeks. A health department official said they are looking at both THC and nicotine products.

Pennsylvania’s UPMC health system, which includes 40 hospitals, including the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, has treated at least 14 individuals with acute lung injuries related to vaping in recent weeks, doctors said. Several patients told clinicians they bought THC products online from a popular brand called Dank Vapes. Industry sources say marketers often fill an empty cartridge with potentially unsafe ingredients and sell to unsuspecting customers.

“We suspect adulterated or contaminated products, because these [marijuana] products have been out there for some time, and we’ve not seen these cases until this summer,” said Phillip Lamberty, a pulmonologist and critical care specialist at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, who cared for three patients in recent weeks. Two of them used products containing THC, he said. He wasn’t sure what product the third was vaping.

One patient purchased his product from an illicit drug dealer. Another patient told Lamberty he had previously smoked marijuana but bought an online product and vaped THC for the first time about a week before falling ill.

In California’s Kings County, all seven patients who had acute respiratory distress syndrome reported buying marijuana vape cartridges from “pop-up shops,” said Nancy Gerking, the county’s assistant director of public health.

“The patients had switched from regular retailers to the pop-up shops,” Gerking said. The patients “found a difference between the potency of the products,” she said. “They had to use twice as much, so they were taking twice as much of the product into their lungs.”

State health departments are sending samples to the FDA’s forensic laboratory in Cincinnati, where an initial targeted analysis is testing for THC, CBD and nicotine, officials said. The FDA and other labs are also doing more broad-based testing for solvents and possible contaminants to look for any pattern.

Friday’s statement said that “the FDA has received about 80 samples and continues to receive requests from states to send more samples for the FDA to analyze. The samples represent a variety of different types of products and substances — a number of which contained incomplete information about the product. The FDA is analyzing those samples for their contents, whether they contain nicotine, substances such as THC or other cannabinoids, or other chemicals and ingredients.”

Among the possible culprits are oils and “cutting agents” being added to the liquid in vaping devices, especially those containing THC. State officials and marijuana industry sources said black-market dealers appear to be using new substances to thin out THC oil, which is thick, odorless and colorless. Unknown oils, also colorless and odorless, are then being added back to the mixture to give the appearance of purity, according to Alex Traverso, a spokesman for California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control, which regulates commercial cannabis licenses for medical and adult-use cannabis in the state.

“Yes, that is something that is being considered,” the CDC official said when asked about the new cutting agents. During the aerosolization process, the oil heats up and produces the vapor cloud. But when it cools, it returns to its original state, and tiny aerosolized droplets could be inhaled into the lungs. “That could be responsible for problems we’re seeing in these individuals,” the official said.

“People have also talked about some of it getting into the gut,” the official said.

Some patients have complained about vomiting and diarrhea, and the presence of these substances in the gut “may account for the gastrointestinal problems that some people have reported.”

Unlike infectious disease outbreaks, this investigation has been more difficult because investigators don’t have a specific culprit, an established national system of collecting information or even a consistent definition of the illness. Unlike certain infectious diseases, such as measles, which are required to be reported to federal authorities, this illness does not fall in that category. States are not required to report possible cases of vaping-related illnesses to the CDC.

The agency hopes to establish a data-collection system for states by early next week. State and federal officials are hoping to finalize an initial definition of a vaping-related lung injury or illness by week’s end.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Tests reveal CBD products spiked with synthetic cannabis across U.S.
All in all, the investigation’s lab testing indicated synthetic cannabis labelled as CBD products in over a dozen states


Some producers in the U.S. have substituted cheap and dangerous synthetic cannabis for the ultra-popular ingredient, CBD


Some producers in the U.S. have substituted cheap and dangerous synthetic cannabis for the ultra-popular ingredient, CBD Drug Enforcement Agency
An investigation by the Associated Press (AP) has revealed concerning revelations about the sales of products containing supposed cannabidiol (CBD), a psychoactive, but non-intoxicating, cannabinoid derived from the cannabis plant.

Turns out, some producers in the U.S. have substituted cheap and dangerous synthetic cannabis (aka Spice or K2) for the ultra-popular ingredient that is outselling common supplements such as vitamins C and D in parts of the world, including the U.K. Unlike CBD, synthetic cannabis is both psychoactive and highly intoxicating.

A reporter for the AP purchased five vaporizer cartridges in Los Angeles that were alleged to contain CBD extract—but lab tests indicated that two of the cartridges contained synthetic cannabis.

Similarly, authorities in Alabama revealed that more than two dozen cannabis products alleging to contain CBD actually contained synthetic cannabinoids.


All in all, the investigation’s lab testing showed synthetic cannabis labelled as CBD products in more than a dozen U.S. states.

“People have started to see the market grow and there are some fly-by-night companies trying to make a quick buck,” Marielle Weintraub, president of the U.S. Hemp Authority, told AP.

The practice of swapping out CBD for cheaply produced synthetics is believed to have contributed to dozens of people ending up in emergency rooms, even putting some users in a coma.

“It’s Russian roulette,” James Neal-Kababick, director of Flora Research Laboratories, which tested the products for the investigation, told AP.
In New Zealand, where the real thing is prohibited, synthetic cannabis has become a health crisis and is being blamed for a number of deaths, hospitalizations and deadly vehicular crashes, such as the one in Taranaki that killed seven people, including an eight-year-old child and a five-month-old baby.

The AP investigation comes on the heels of news reports of individuals experiencing lung disease—or, in a couple of reported cases, death—thanks to suspect vape cartridges. The American Medical Association, in fact, has urged Americans to stop using vapes of any kind for the time being. The cause so far remain unknown.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
EXPERTS WARN OF COVID-19 CBD SCAMMERS

There will always be those looking to take advantage of dark times, and the people pushing their cannabis products as a COVID-19 cure or reliever definitely fall into that category.

Over the past couple of weeks, the nation’s oldest cannabis reform organization NORML has twice warned consumers about shady companies looking to take advantage of the crisis currently unfolding across the globe. Los Angeles County Public Health officials announced there are now 1,465 cases of COVID-19 in L.A., and the death toll has risen to 26 as of early Friday afternoon.

NORML first warned consumers about scammers last week. In an email going over organizational efforts to continue advocacy through telecommuting and best practices for consumers, executive director Erik Altieri noted: “We also encourage everyone to remain vigilant of online misinformation (like any claims cannabis or CBD can help cure or protect against this virus) and to beware of potential scammers promoting similar claims.”

But this would not prove enough. Unfortunately, after multiple reports of frauds at the intersection of cannabis and coronavirus, NORML had to speak more directly to the issue a week later.

NORML told its membership in an email some predatory marketers are seeking to profit by selling coronavirus-inspired snake oil products based on unsubstantiated claims and that some of those trash heaps are explicitly targeting cannabis consumers.

“If something sounds too good to be true, it likely is. During these difficult times, we encourage people to be skeptical of any unsubstantiated claims, particularly those circulating online, surrounding the use of cannabis or any other uncorroborated treatment for COVID-19,” Altieri wrote.

We asked Altieri if it seemed like a growing problem over the last week causing NORML’s follow-up email on the subject.

“It should be of no surprise that similar folks who had no qualms with taking advantage of patients and other concerned individuals during good times, have no problem doing so during a health crisis,” Alteri told L.A. Weekly in an email.

Alteri admits it is hard to quantify if there is a higher volume of scams related to CBD and cannabis occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic than before, but it would seem obvious that it is even crueler now.

“People are nervous about the state of the world and their own health, combined with social distancing and isolation, they are now more than ever seeking out answers or products that give them a sense of control and safety,” he said, “Unfortunately, answering this call for knowledge is an army of snake oil salesmen who lack any real moral center and are putting their ‘customers’ and the general public at great risk with their false promises and bogus products.”

Alteri recommends for all Americans to be skeptical of all health claims from unreputable sources and stick to getting advice from agencies like the CDC or their own health care professionals.

The Alleged Culprits

NBC KGW8 in Portland called the Oregon Attorney General’s office about advertising claims around CBD and coronavirus. The AG’s office was quick to jump on the claims as a violation of a “substantiation rule,” set to go into effect in early April that requires scientific evidence to support promotional health claims

“We were very pleased that the store was willing to remove their sandwich board sign when our investigator explained that it could be in violation of Oregon law,” Kristina Edmundson of the AG’s office told KGW8. “Unfortunately, the message is simple: There are no known cures for COVID-19. Please don’t try to sell something that suggests there are!”

The store noted to KGW8 their heart is in the right place and “we want to help people as much as we can.”

The wellness enthusiasts at HerbalAmy.com were hit with a notice from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Federal Trade Commission for improperly marketing a COVID-19 prevention package. The letter was a notice to owner Amy Weidner they had reviewed claims she made about products on her website and social media in February.

“The FDA has determined that your website offers “Coronavirus Protocol” products (Coronavirus Boneset Tea, Coronavirus Cell Protection, Coronavirus Core tincture, Coronavirus Immune System and Elderberry Tincture) for sale in the United States and that these products are intended to mitigate, prevent, treat, diagnose or cure COVID-19 in people. FDA has determined that these products are unapproved new drugs sold in violation of section 505(a) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), 21 U.S.C. § 355(a),” the notice from the Feds read.

Owner Amy Weidner issued a statement explaining the incident from her perspective.

“FDA is very stringent on the wording we can use to describe our herbal products. We quoted a description from the inventor of this particular herbal combinations from Stephen Buhner. He is considered one of the leading experts in herbal products and developed this formula called Coronavirus Protocol. The letter we received from the FDA was simply an administrative warning that we cannot make any claims concerning herbal products. We removed the passage containing Mr Buhners description of the products and are in order to be in compliance with all FDA requirements. The quality of the product was never in doubt and we continue to service clients nationwide,” Weidner wrote on her blog.

The Expert

Michael Backes, the author of Cannabis Pharmacy: The Practical Guide to Medical Marijuana and one of the top cannabis pharmacology minds in general, weighed in about the FDA getting involved and the actual impact of cannabis on the immune system.

“The FDA has sent a lot of warning letters in relation to CBD,” Backes told L.A. Weekly.

He went on to note the nutraceutical industry runs into similar problems all the time around health claims. “So the nutraceutical industry, what they do is they don’t make medical claims. They make what is called structure and function claims.”

That means they can’t say chamomile tea cures insomnia but can say it promotes restful sleep.

“These guys got in trouble because they were making a medical claim about impacting, mitigating or curing COVID-19,” Backes said of the HerbalAmy.com letter. “The FDA hates that and the FDA has gotten really good at monitoring the internet for claims on these products.”

Backes said these things are the last kind of thing you want to see from the FDA saying,” they will show up and shut you down no problem.” And they don’t make the distinction between well-intentioned hippies spreading their cures and the real charlatans.

“There are people making these claims bases on a real desire to help people and there are people making these claims to make a quick buck,” Backes said. “I don’t mind if they go after some people because there is a lot of quack crap out there when it comes to the effectiveness of CBD because the truth is not a lot of people bother to learn or figure out how CBD really works.”

Real Best Practices for Smokers

Backed noted giving your cannabinoid receptors a break for a few days can really help give your immune system a little boost because smoking cannabis slows down your first line of defense against viruses.

“When your body gets a virus, the first thing it does is introduce interferons locally. The problem with people smoking cannabis is that they slow that response down because THC is mildly immunosuppressive,” Backes said. “So you have to be a little careful with it, you don’t want to be taking big fat dabs all day and expect your lungs to respond like the lungs of someone who wasn’t taking big fat dabs all day.”

Backes says most of your brain’s receptors completely rebuild in about 28 days, except for in the hippocampus, which plays a big part in learning and memory.

“That can take up to six months. But the interesting thing is if you take a little CBD tincture every day, people whose hair tested positive for both THC and CBD didn’t have those changes in the hippocampus,” Backes said. “It looks like CBD kind of works like a safety belt for protecting the hippocampus from those changes.”
 

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