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Law South Carolina

Baron23

Well-Known Member
This is kind of a Darwin Award thing to me....like, how can somebody so stupid still be able to walk and breath at the same time much less get elected as South Carolina AG.


SC police, doctors fighting medical marijuana; AG calls it US’s ‘most dangerous drug’

COLUMBIA — Flanked by lawmakers, law enforcement officials and doctors in white lab coats, S.C. Attorney General Alan Wilson called marijuana “the most dangerous drug” in America while denouncing legislation Wednesday that would allow patients to obtain it with a doctor’s prescription.

Various speakers, which included State Law Enforcement Division Chief Mark Keel and leaders from the S.C. Medical Association, suggested the use of medical marijuana would cause a litany of problems in South Carolina: addiction, increased traffic accidents and — without specifically citing any peer-reviewed research — an increase in the number of overdose deaths.

While standing in the center of the Statehouse lobby, Wilson rattled off slang describing the high from marijuana.

“They use words like stoned, high, wasted, baked, fried, cooked, chonged, cheeched, dope-faced, blazed, blitzed, blunted, blasted, danked, stupid, wrecked — and that’s only half the words they use,” Wilson said. “Are these consistent with something that describes a medicine?”

Wilson classified marijuana as the most dangerous drug because he said it was “the most misunderstood drug.”

Dr. March Seabrook, the S.C. Medical Association president, focused his opposition on the lack of medical and regulatory oversight of marijuana. The trade group for doctors, he said, supports more research on marijuana and the use of cannabis oil for childhood seizures, a treatment approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration last year.

After the news conference, the Medical Association said it disagreed with Wilson’s assessment that marijuana is “the most dangerous drug” in the country. Still, Seabrook argued the new legislation “will not improve the health of South Carolina.”

Medical marijuana supporters at the Statehouse said Wilson’s comments and the overall tone at the news conference played on the public’s fears.

“This is just hysteria,” said state Sen. Dick Harpootlian, a Columbia Democrat and former prosecutor.

Nationwide, 33 states have set up regulations to allow for the legal use of marijuana for medical purposes. So far this year, 15 S.C. lawmakers, including many of Charleston County’s legislative delegation, sponsored a bill to add South Carolina to that growing list.

The newly proposed legislation would allow patients to obtain up to two ounces of marijuana every two weeks — an amount that Wilson said is too much for a patient to use in that time.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

South Carolina Voters Support Legalizing Medical Marijuana By A Five-To-One Ratio, New Poll Finds


South Carolina voters support legalizing medical marijuana by a ratio of five to one, according to a new poll.

As lawmakers consider bills to enact the policy change this year, the survey shows 72 percent of respondents back the reform, while just 15 percent are opposed.

“The results of this poll reinforce what advocates have known for years—that the overwhelming majority of South Carolinians support a compassionate medical cannabis program,” Judy Ghanem, whose daughter suffers from a rare genetic disorder, said in a press release. “Voters understand that medical cannabis can provide life-changing relief, and that the law should not stand in the way.”

“My daughter and thousands of other South Carolinians deserve the right to the same medical option that is now legal in 36 states,” she said. “It is past time lawmakers listen to voters and adopt the S.C. Compassionate Care Act to stop needless suffering.”

Rep. Bill Herbkersman (R) and Sen. Tom Davis (R) prefiled companion versions of that legislation in December. The next month, the measures were formally introduced and referred to the Medical, Military, Public and Municipal Affairs Committee and Medical Affairs Committee, respectively.

“I feel there is a very good chance we get something passed this session,” Davis said. “This bill has been fully vetted after five years of testimony and input by various stakeholders. The time has come for lawmakers to get out of the way and allow patients, in consultation with their physicians, to legally and safely access medicinal cannabis.”

Under the proposal, patients would be eligible for medical marijuana if a physician certifies that they have at least one qualifying condition such as epilepsy, autism, chronic pain, glaucoma or post-traumatic stress disorder. The House version stipulates that doctor could make the recommendation for any condition they see fit.

A Medical Cannabis Advisory Board would be established, and regulators would be authorized to add conditions.

Patients could purchase and possess up to two ounces of marijuana per 14-day period, but they would be prohibited from cultivating cannabis for personal use.

Support for medical marijuana legalization among South Carolina residents has been notable stable, as a 2018 Benchmark Research poll similarly found 72 percent support for the reform, including nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of Republicans.

Also that year, 82 percent of voters in the state’s Democratic primary election voted in favor of medical cannabis legalization in a nonbinding ballot advisory vote. Lawmakers prefiled four marijuana measures for the 2019 session, but they did not advance.

The latest survey was released by the advocacy groups SC Compassionate Care Alliance and Compassionate SC. It involved interviews with 801 registered South Carolina voters from February 16-19.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

South Carolina Senators Approve Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill In Committee


A South Carolina Senate committee on Wednesday approved a bill to legalize medical marijuana in the state.

The Compassionate Care Act, sponsored by Sen. Tom Davis (R), would allow patients with qualifying conditions to possess and purchase up to two ounces of cannabis every two weeks.

Members of the Senate Medical Affairs Committee passed the bill in a 9-5 vote.

“You see poll after poll—even in South Carolina, even in the most conservative parts of South Carolina—showing that upwards of 70 percent, in some cases 80 percent, of South Carolinians want doctors to be able to provide this to their patients if in the doctor’s opinion, it can be of benefit,” Davis said.

He also repeatedly made the case that his legislation “is the most conservative medical cannabis bill in the country.”

“I have promised this committee that I was going to come up with a bill that was truly a medical bill,” Davis said. “That it was not a slippery slope to recreational use—was not a wink and a nod to recreational use.”

For the initial rollout, regulators would approve 15 licenses for vertically integrated marijuana businesses that would control production, distribution and sales. More than 100 dispensaries would be licensed to operate under the bill.

The Senate version of the legislation would ban smokable marijuana products, while a separate House bill that’s pending would give patients that option. Home cultivation would be prohibited under both versions.

Additionally, the Senate version lists specific types of conditions that qualify for cannabis treatment, whereas the House measure would also allow physicians to recommend marijuana to any patient with a debilitating condition that the doctor is qualified to treat.

The sponsor offered an amendment to the legislation that the panel adopted. It would allocate revenue to cover implementation as well as drug prevention education. Another component specifies that health insurers aren’t required to cover medical cannabis.

The amendment would require “material conformance” with the requirements of the medical marijuana law by before reciprocity for out-of-state patients is grants. It also stipulates that the state law would be repealed if it is deemed to be preempted by federal law in court.

South Carolina is one of a select few states without an effective medical cannabis program, though it does have a limited CBD law on the books.

A poll released in February found that South Carolina voters support legalizing medical marijuana by a ratio of five to one. But the state does not have a citizen-led initiative process that has empowered voters in other states to get the policy change enacted.

Support for medical marijuana legalization among South Carolina residents has been notably stable, as a 2018 Benchmark Research poll similarly found 72 percent support for the reform, including nearly two-thirds (63 percent) of Republicans.

Also that year, 82 percent of voters in the state’s Democratic primary election voted in favor of medical cannabis legalization in a nonbinding ballot advisory vote. Lawmakers prefiled four marijuana measures for the 2019 session, but they did not advance.

“I feel there is a very good chance we get something passed this session,” Davis said after prefiling this latest legislation in December. “This bill has been fully vetted after five years of testimony and input by various stakeholders. The time has come for lawmakers to get out of the way and allow patients, in consultation with their physicians, to legally and safely access medicinal cannabis.”

The sponsor also said that if the legislature doesn’t advance the reform, he’d propose a bill to put the question of medical marijuana legalization to voters through a referendum.

A coalition of advocates for health care and criminal justice reform, as well as veterans groups, have recently stepped up their push to get medical cannabis legalized in South Carolina.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

South Carolina Senator Threatens To Block ‘Every Single Other Bill’ If Medical Marijuana Doesn’t Get A Vote


If other South Carolina senators move to block a bill to legalize medical marijuana, its sponsor said on Tuesday that he would use his power to stop every other piece of legislation on the chamber’s calendar in protest.

“We’re going to get this bill passed,” Sen. Tom Davis (R), who filed the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act, said at a press conference with supporters. “And if there are some up on the Senate floor that are still in this reefer madness, drug war mentality and block and stand in the way of this bill, I will exercise my rights as a senator to respond in kind to every single other bill on this calendar.”

Sen. Greg Hembree (R) said on Monday that he intended to block the cannabis legislation, which is on the Senate calendar after clearing the Senate Medical Affairs Committee in a 9-5 vote last week, from proceeding further. If he uses his authority to stop consideration as a single senator, it would require a three-fifths majority of the chamber to move ahead on the bill.

Davis, at the press conference, said that federal prohibition was imposed under the Nixon administration in order to “punish” the president’s political enemies—but even so, the senator is singularly focused on lifting that prohibition for medical use. He has taken pains to argue that his measure is not a “slippery slope” to legalize marijuana for recreational purposes.

“We need to get this bill passed. I understand what South Carolinians want,” he said. “They want to empower doctors, they want to help patients, they do not want recreational use.”

The senator’s legislation would allow patients with qualifying conditions to possess and purchase up to two ounces of cannabis every two weeks.

During last week’s committee hearing, Davis repeatedly made the case that his bill “is the most conservative medical cannabis bill in the country.”

For the initial rollout, regulators would approve 15 licenses for vertically integrated marijuana businesses that would control production, distribution and sales. More than 100 dispensaries would be licensed to operate under the bill.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Sen. Tom Davis (R), who filed the South Carolina Compassionate Care Act, said at a press conference with supporters. “And if there are some up on the Senate floor that are still in this reefer madness, drug war mentality and block and stand in the way of this bill, I will exercise my rights as a senator to respond in kind to every single other bill on this calendar.”

"But as we enter the last week of the legislative session, there’s still a question as to whether the discussion around the Compassionate Care Act will take place this year or next."​

Well, I'm guessing that this guy Davis has retreated and not exercised his right to block everything if he doesn't get a vote on med MJ.

“We don’t have the list of conditions so broad to where anybody can walk into a doctor’s office and get an authorization to take cannabis,” Davis says. Those conditions include cancer, multiple sclerosis, a neurological disease or disorder including epilepsy, glaucoma, and PTSD with confirmation that someone has experienced a traumatic event."​
Kind of a shit program anyway.....note what is NOT in this list of eligible maladies.

Medical marijuana steps away from legalization in South Carolina


CHARLESTON, S.C. (WCSC) - A bill that would legalize medical marijuana in South Carolina is on the calendar for debate at the state House.

But as we enter the last week of the legislative session, there’s still a question as to whether the discussion around the Compassionate Care Act will take place this year or next.

State Sen. Tom Davis, who represents Beaufort and Jasper counties, has been working on a bill to legalize medical marijuana since 2015.

“My job is to come up with a bill that empowers doctors and puts medicine in their hands to help their patients,” Davis says.

Over the years, dozens of other states have passed similar bills and Davis says he’s learned from their mistakes.

“South Carolinians do not want to legalize it for recreational purposes,” Davis says. “So the answer to those people who say it’s a slippery slope, I would say, a state’s laws are reflective of what their people want.”

Out of all of the other states’ bills, South Carolina’s is the most conservative, he says. In fact, it lists out the debilitating medical conditions that could qualify.

“We don’t have the list of conditions so broad to where anybody can walk into a doctor’s office and get an authorization to take cannabis,” Davis says.

Those conditions include cancer, multiple sclerosis, a neurological disease or disorder including epilepsy, glaucoma, and PTSD with confirmation that someone has experienced a traumatic event.

Davis also says it’s going to be tightly regulated.

“You only have a specific number of authorized growers - a very finite amount,” Davis says. “A specific number of individuals or entities that can process it. A specific number of dispensaries and we want to limit the number of these establishments because I don’t want the Department of Health and Environmental Control and the State Law Enforcement Division and other regulators to be overwhelmed.”

If the bill passes, how would things change?​


Many might not know – cannabis is already approved to grow in South Carolina. One farm that does is Nature’s Highway Farm in Neeses – just west of Orangeburg. They’re one of hundreds in the Palmetto State that have a permit to grow cannabis – but only plants that contain less than 0.3 percent of THC – which is classified as Hemp.

Andy Fogle says they have hundreds of plants they keep trimming and replicating as part of their hemp-growing process.

“If we allow them to bud, then we’ve lost that genetics, so we have to keep that stuff,” Fogle says.

They have thousands of replication plants that they are waiting on to root and then they will plant those in the field come June.

When it comes to the extraction of the hemp, that goes to another Nature’s Highway facility. They dry the flower and combine it with frozen food-grade alcohol. It’s essentially like a washing machine which washes the oil out of the plant. From there it goes through filters and ultimately ends up in the evaporation room where they separate the oil from the alcohol.

“We’re pumping CBD oil and ethanol that’s mixed together,” Fogle says. “It’s heated up. What’s happening is the ethanol, or alcohol, is evaporating. It’s going up a column as a vapor. In this coil is a chiller and you’ll the see ethanol, or alcohol, is coming back out. Once we get out all the ethanol, there will be nothing but CBD oil left.”

Fogle explains if medical marijuana were to be legalized, this entire process would stay the same. They would just be dealing with a different strain of cannabis.

While Fogle says they would definitely be interested in pursuing a permit to grow medical marijuana, if it’s legalized, Davis reiterates he wants to start out slow.

“I think ultimately what you’ll end up with is maybe between 15 to 30, growers, approximately that number of processors, more dispensers because it’s a broader portion of the state you have to cover there,” Davis says. “It’s going to take a while for DHEC and SLED to become accustomed to this and how they properly regulate and oversee the growing, processing and dispensing.”

DHEC released the following statement on the possible legalization of medical marijuana:



DHEC is charged with implementing the laws made by the state legislature as they pertain to the agency. DHEC is aware of bills that have been introduced that address medical marijuana and has been following the issue. DHEC also has not prepared to implement the bills at this time since legislation has not passed. If any bills are made into law, DHEC will carry out its obligation to implement the law, including any requirements placed on the agency related to applications and licensing.

Davis says the argument against legalization because the federal government has banned or outlawed it isn’t exactly true.

“If you look what Congress has done every single year, the past several years, whenever they pass their annual budget they have a proviso in that budget with the appropriation to the Department of Justice saying none of the money that we’re appropriating to you, Department of Justice, can be used to challenge or attack or undermine laws in states that have authorized the medical use of cannabis,” he says. “So, you’ve got Congress every year saying to the states this is something that’s okay for you to do. You’ve also seen that in the Executive Branch and the Department of Justice. There are written directives to U.S. attorneys throughout the country saying, ‘Do not challenge states that have passed medical cannabis laws.’ And finally, you have the courts, the Judicial Branch, which has repeatedly held that authorizing it for medicinal use is within a state’s power.”

As it stands right now, the Compassionate Care Act has been voted out of the Senate Medical Affairs Committee and is on the calendar to be discussed on the Senate floor.

Davis says he has the votes to get it passed, it’s just a matter of when it’s going to be discussed.
 

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