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Meds Asthma

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
THC MAKES CANNABIS IDEAL FOR TREATING ASTHMA, STUDY SHOWS


A new clinical study reports that cannabis acts as a bronchodilator, meaning that it dilates the bronchi and bronchioles, increasing airflow to the lungs. This peer-reviewed study was published in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics. It claims that cannabinoids protect the lungs from constriction and can be quite helpful for asthma patients.

The study compared the effects of six cannabinoids – THC, CBD, CBG, CBC, CBD-A, and THC-V – on contractions of the guinea pig-isolated trachea and bronchoconstriction induced by nerve stimulation in anesthetized guinea pigs. A team of researchers at the King’s College London, led by Raj Makwana, discovered the following:


Source)

This is great news for those with asthma, who often suffer from bronchoconstriction, the constriction of the airways in the lungs, nose and mouth due to the tightening of surrounding muscles. Because of this, an asthma attack limits a person’s oxygen intake. Low-level inflammation can also be found in bronchi and bronchioles of asthma sufferers.

Over the last few decades, we’ve come to better understand the role of cannabanoids on the human body. Cannabinoid receptors are present throughout the body. This explains why people can benefit from cannabis in so many different ways.

Cannabinoid receptors have been found in human lung tissue, although in relatively low concentrations, and are thought to play a vital role in the regulation of inflammation, muscular contractions and dilations, and various metabolic processes. ~ Pulmonary Pathology (Source)

Other studies have shown that cannabis has little to no long-term effect on the lungs. For example, researchers out of the University of California, San Francisco, found:

Occasional and low cumulative marijuana use was not associated with adverse effects on pulmonary function. (Source)

Even as early as in 1973, scientists were discovering the bronchodilatory effect of cannabis smoke. A study conducted by Louis Vachon, M.D. et al at Boston University was the first to state:

Marijuana smoke, unlike cigarette smoke, causes bronchodilatation rather than bronchoconstriction and, unlike opiates, does not cause central respiratory depression. (Source)

In addition to air pathway constriction, people experiencing an asthma attack also suffer from significant pain. Numerous studies have shown that cannabis has powerful pain-reducing properties. The positive impact on the respiratory system cannot be denied.

It’s not surprising that anyone with asthma or respiratory issues would be apprehensive about smoking cannabis, but physicians in states where medical cannabis is legal are starting to prescribe it to patients for treating asthma.

Dr. Dustin Sulak, a leading medical cannabis physician, finds that vaporizing cannabis is a highly effective solution for asthma patients. This is because a good vaporizer provides superior temperature control.

“Probably 90% of people with asthma can take a single vaporize inhalation,” Dr. Sulak states.

“If they do it right, they’re going to be able to breathe deeper, expand their lungs, and relieve constriction.”

Dr. Sulak recommends a daily dosing to get a baseline level of medication in your system for better overall asthma control. (Source
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis and asthma? You might be surprised at what happens when you combine the two...
By Rachel Garland
on October 13, 2017

Experiencing coughing, shortness of breath, and chest tightness?

Not a fun experience.

An estimated one out of twelve people suffer from asthma – a chronic respiratory diseasewhich typically becomes present during childhood.

Here's a fact that might surprise you:

While many people experience minimal symptoms with treatment, asthma was linked to over 3,000 deaths in 2010 alone.

So, how does cannabis fit into the picture?

Naturally, many asthmatics choose to stay away from cannabis for fear of exacerbating their symptoms.

But contrary to popular belief, studies have shown cannabis has little to no long-term impact on the lungs.

In fact – recent research is showing cannabis is helpful rather than harmful for asthma patients (especially if you use the best cannabis delivery method for asthma patients).

Cannabis opens rather than restricts the airways
Here's what you need to know:

Essentially, cannabis acts a bronchodilator rather than a bronchoconstrictor.

The science on this is very interesting.

A study in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics showed that cannabinoids protect the lungs.

Using guinea pigs, the researchers measured the ability of cannabinoids to inhibit bronchoconstriction.

The researchers in the study specifically looked at cannbinoids THC, CBD, CBG, CBC, CBD-A, and THC-V.

Surprisingly, the study revealed that THC and THC-V were the only cannabinoids to inhibit constriction, with THC being the most-effective.

The results from this study are astonishing considering that bronchoconstriction is one of the biggest problem plaguing asthma sufferers.



During an asthma attack, the bronchioles (air passageways in the nose and mouth) become constricted. As a result, the rate of oxygen flow is severely restricted.

Cannabis helps to open up these airways.

Several studies have shown that cannabis improves bronchoconstriction while resting and during an asthma attack.

Dr. Rachel Knox, co-founder of American Cannabinoid Clinics, talked to Green Flower about the plant’s efficacy for asthma patients.

“THC is actually a very potent bronchodilator and that’s exactly what we need when we’re treating asthma,” she says.

“When we are suffering from an asthma attack, those bronchioles are squeezing on themselves, making it very hard to breathe. Well, enter THC. It opens those bronchioles right up and we can breathe better.”

That's not all...

Cannabis possesses powerful anti-inflammatory effects -- great for asthma

These mushroom-shaped crystals are the trichomes, which contain most of the plant's active cannabinoids. Very important for both cannabis and asthma.
Why is inflammation important here?

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the lungs’ airways, and cannabis happens to be a powerful anti-inflammatory agent.

Essentially, this inflammation of the air passages causes a temporary narrowing of the lungs, which reduces the amount of oxygen carried throughout the body.

For asthma sufferers, this makes breathing difficult, to say the least.

In fact, inflammation is not only present during an asthma attack but also when resting.

Low-level inflammation can also be found in bronchi and bronchioles of asthma sufferers. And when an asthma attack does occur, inflammation increases further.

In severe cases inflammation can even cause total loss of breath.

Cannabis is a well-known anti-inflammatory, interacting with cannabinoid receptors throughout the body, including the lungs.

A study in the journal Mediators of Inflammation revealed that the cannabinoid CBD contains potent immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory responses.

In addition, the findings also showed that CBD reduces mucus hypersecretion – a hallmark characteristic of asthma.

While the study has not yet been replicated on humans, the researchers concluded CBD could be a powerful treatment for asthma as it regulates exaggerated inflammatory responses in the body.

Here's another important benefit for cannabis and asthma:

Cannabis reduces muscle spasticity
What's the story here?

Bronchospasm, otherwise known as bronchial spasms, are a sudden constriction of the muscles in the lungs. Causing difficulty in breathing, reactions range from mild to severe.

For those with asthma, this likely comes as no surprise. Bronchospasms are a hallmark symptom of the condition.

But cannabis has shown to be incredibly effective for alleviating, and even eliminating muscle spasms.

How is this possible?

According to Dr. Jessica Knox, it has to do with two components in specific cannabis strains – CBD and alpha-pinene.

“Alpha-pinene and CBD have some muscle spasm relief effect which is crucial to hitting those bronchial muscles and helping them relax so that you can breathe better,” Knox says.


α-Pinene is a terpene found in specific strains of cannabis. For example, ‘Jack Herer’ is one of the most high-volume sources of pinene. It is also found in the oils of many coniferous trees, most notably the pine tree, and is also found in the essential oil of rosemary.
By relaxing the muscles in the lungs, the airways expand, allowing for an increase in airflow.

A study in 2014 also indicated cannabis’ effectiveness for alleviating muscle spasms in the lungs.

In fact, the researchers believe this mechanism may explain the acute bronchodilation (expansion of the bronchial air passages in the respiratory tract) produced when ingesting cannabis.

Cannabis alleviates asthma-related pain
If you're still asking yourself whether cannabis is good for asthma, or if you should consume cannabis with asthma...

Don't forget about the pain relief.

While pain is not a primary symptom associated with asthma, over 75% of people who experience an asthma attack also experience chest pain.

For those with severe forms of asthma, this pain can be uncomfortable and even debilitating.

However, it is important to note though that there are no pain receptors in the lungs.

Asthma sufferers primarily experience pain because they are unable to breath properly.

When normal airflow is interrupted, additional stress is placed on accessory muscles such as the sternocleidomastoid and scalene.

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU: How to Find Your Ideal Cannabis Vaporizer


During an asthma attack, these muscles must contract to help expand the ribcage.

Because there is additional stress on these muscles, asthma sufferers often experience pain. This is primarily due to the fact that these muscles are rarely (if ever) used for normal breathing.

It is essentially the same principle that applies after a tough workout for the first time. When a muscle is worked that has not been used, pain ensues.

While there have yet to be any studies that specifically address whether or not cannabis is effective at treating asthma-related pain – we do know that cannabis can reduce pressure and muscle spasticity in the lungs.

This in turn allows for better airflow, causing less stress on accessory muscles.

Not to mention the numerous studies indicating the powerful pain-relieving effects of cannabis.

Best delivery method for cannabis and asthma?

Vaporizing is much gentler on your lungs and can deliver the medication without increasing irritation.
Is cannabis good for asthma? Science and a lot of asthma patients who've tried it are saying yes.

However, many asthma suffers are still hesitant to try cannabis. After all, isn’t smoking cannabis the last thing someone with asthma should do?

While studies as early as the 1970s suggest smoking cannabis widens rather than restricts the airways, thanks to technology, there are more treatment options than ever before.

One of those options is vaporization. Dr. Dustin Sulak, a leading medical cannabis physician, finds that vaporizing cannabis is a highly effective solution for asthma patients. This is because a good vaporizer provides superior temperature control.

“Probably 90% of people with asthma can take a single vaporize inhalation,” Dr. Sulak states.

“If they do it right, they’re going to be able to breathe deeper, expand their lungs, and relieve constriction.”

Dr. Sulak recommends a daily dosing to get a baseline level of medication in your system for better overall asthma control.

For quick onset relief, such as in the case of an asthma attack, he recommends a tincture or vaporizer. These are much gentler on the system and can deliver the medication without increasing irritation.

However, Dr. Sulak suggests that above all, patients listen to their bodies.

“It’s very important to realize that your body talks to you. So if you are using a vaporizer as a method to treat your asthma and it’s causing you to cough or worsening your symptoms, vaporizing may not be for you,” he adds.

In those cases, Dr. Sulak recommends an edible or tincture (best administered sublingually).


 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
How Cannabis Can Rapidly Treat Asthma and Lungs Conditions



By:Dr Alla


Studies have shown that cannabinoids found in marijuana can protect your lungs, alleviate discomfort and constriction from asthma.
Facts are, 1 out of 12 people now suffer from asthma (chronic respiratory disease that is present during childhood). While many experience little to no symptoms with treatment, it still correlates with over 3,000 deaths a year. Many asthma sufferers fear smoking marijuana because they believe it will agitate the condition.


There are new studies that are proving cannabis has almost no impact at all on lung health in the long-term. The study further concluded that cannabis is helpful than terrible for those who suffer from asthma.

Cannabis opens rather than restricts the airways.
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics has published a study that proved cannabinoids are good for the lungs. By using guinea pigs, researchers measured the ability of cannabinoids to inhibit bronchoconstriction. Researchers in this study looked specifically at CBD, CBG,THC, CBD-A, and THC-V cannabinoids. The study showed that THC-V cannabinoids were able to prevent constriction, with THC being highly effective. Cannabis is now seen as a bronchodilator than a bronchoconstrictor.

Results from this amazing study has many baffled, considering that bronchoconstriction is the leading problem with asthma sufferers. When in an asthma attack, the bronchioles (air passages in mouth and nose) close up. With that, oxygen isn’t able to pass through airways. As the study proves, cannabis is able to help open up the airways, while others have proved that cannabis helps with constriction of the bronchioles while in an asthma attack or resting.

Co-founder of The Canna MDS and current Medical Chair of the Minority Cannabis Business Association, Dr. Rachel Knox, spoke with Green Flower on Cannabis’s benefit to patients with asthma. She said: “THC is actually a very potent bronchodilator and that’s exactly what we need when we’re treating asthma. When we are suffering from an asthma attack, those bronchioles are squeezing on themselves, making it very hard to breathe. Well, enter THC. It opens those bronchioles right up and we can breathe better.”

Cannabis possesses powerful anti-inflammatory effects
Inflammation in the airways restricts airflow to the lungs, by making them close and making breathing much difficult. Even in the bronchioles and bronchi can suffer low-level inflammation. Inflammation isn’t only just in asthma attacks, but also while in asthma attacks while resting. When these attacks occur, inflammation becomes worse leading to total loss of breathing.

Cannabis would help with this as it has anti-inflammatory properties that intercept with cannabinoid receptors in our bodies, involving our lungs too. An example, the Journal Mediators of Inflammation, showed that cannabinoid CBD has potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses.

The study also concluded that CBD helps eliminate mucus hyper secretion -a top problem with asthma. This study hasn’t been conducted on humans, but researchers have stated that CBD is an effective treatment for asthma as it maintains balance with the inflammatory responses in our bodies.

Bronchospasms, also known as bronchial spasms, causes difficulty in breathing by constricting the lung muscles. Cannabis is effective at treating and stopping muscle spasms. How is it possible? by calming the lung muscles, the airways open up, allowing an increase in the flow of oxygen. Dr. Jessica Knox says it has to do with two components in specific strains of cannabis-alpha-pinene and CBD.

ALPHA-PINENE AND CBD HAVE SOME MUSCLE SPASM RELIEF EFFECT WHICH IS CRUCIAL TO HITTING THOSE BRONCHIAL MUSCLES AND HELPING THEM RELAX SO THAT YOU CAN BREATHE BETTER.

In 2014, a study was conducted that proved the effectiveness of cannabis in treating muscle spasms in the lungs. The researchers believe this may explain the acute bronchodilation (expanding of the bronchial air passages in the respiratory tract) that is produced when consuming cannabis.

Cannabis alleviates asthma-related pain
About over 75% of patients with asthma, experience chest pains during an attack. It’s imperative to note that there are no pain receptors in our lungs. Due to the inability to breathe, sufferers will feel pain until airflow is back to normal. In severe cases, the pain is chronic and hard to bear. When our airflow is hindered, it adds on more stress on accessory muscles such as our sternocleidomastoid and scalene.

When in an asthma attack, those muscles contract to further expand our ribcage. With the added stress on those muscles, sufferers from asthma will experience pain. The primary cause to this is, is that these muscles aren’t regularly used for breathing. It’s the same scenario when you have a vigorous, beginner workout. When you utilize a muscle that hasn’t been used much, pain occurs.

There has yet to be any scientific study that addresses whether or not cannabis is really effective in alleviating chest pain from asthma, however we do know that cannabis is able to reduce muscle spasticity and pressure in asthmatic lungs. This will bring in air flow, allowing these accessory muscles to relax. There have been many studies out there have proved cannabis has powerful pain-alleviating effects.

Best method for treating asthma with cannabis?
It’s clear that the impact of cannabis on asthma patients is obvious. Still, many asthma sufferers still feel hesitant in smoking cannabis. Seriously though, isn’t that the last thing someone with asthma would want to do?

There are studies from the 1970’s that prove cannabis widens, and doesn’t restrict the airways. With modern technology, there are effective treatment options available. One of the new options, is vaporization.

A leading medical cannabis physician, Dr. Dustin Sulak, says he has found that vaporizing cannabis is a highly effective treatment for patients with asthma.
Source:Healthvirals.com
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
I don't agree with the idea that you should treat an asthma attack by vaping or smoking. I have asthma. When it's bothering me vaping makes me worse, as in non stop coughing and trouble breathing, congestion and so on. It's obvious the vapor irritates me. It might be the tiny bits that get by, idk, but I do a little better with concentrates when my asthma gets bad. And if it's too bad I just use cannacaps and let my lungs and pipes heal. Vaping might work on an asthma attack for some, but not me, as much as I'd like that to be true.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
I don't agree with the idea that you should treat an asthma attack by vaping or smoking. I have asthma. When it's bothering me vaping makes me worse
I can see how that would be the case. But the above article left out an important quote that was in the preceding article:

“Probably 90% of people with asthma can take a single vaporize inhalation,” Dr. Sulak states.

“If they do it right, they’re going to be able to breathe deeper, expand their lungs, and relieve constriction.”
He's talking about one hit, done correctly. That's probably a relatively small amount. And what 'correctly' is I'm not sure because they don't elaborate other than to say use a vaporizer. Perhaps moist, warm heat? Like a bubbler with warm water? And a very small hit?

I don't have asthma so I have no way of knowing if this could possibly work.
 

BD9

Leaf Dawg
I don't agree with the idea that you should treat an asthma attack by vaping or smoking. I have asthma. When it's bothering me vaping makes me worse, as in non stop coughing and trouble breathing, congestion and so on. It's obvious the vapor irritates me. It might be the tiny bits that get by, idk, but I do a little better with concentrates when my asthma gets bad. And if it's too bad I just use cannacaps and let my lungs and pipes heal. Vaping might work on an asthma attack for some, but not me, as much as I'd like that to be true.
I was kind of wondering about his as well. Even with my non asthmatic lungs sometimes it hurts a little when I have a hit.
I wonder if they mean a vaporizer like what you would put Vicks Vapo rub in? A warm mist type vaporizer?
Have you tried cannabis tea? In the simplest of terms, just pouring boiling water over a big bud? Hmm..........



I can see how that would be the case. But the above article left out an important quote that was in the preceding article:



He's talking about one hit, done correctly. That's probably a relatively small amount. And what 'correctly' is I'm not sure because they don't elaborate other than to say use a vaporizer. Perhaps moist, warm heat? Like a bubbler with warm water? And a very small hit?

I don't have asthma so I have no way of knowing if this could possibly work.
I thought the same thing when i saw correct. I thought to myself, WTF is the correct way?
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
I don't know if there are different types of asthma, but I know there are different causes. Mine is an environmental asthma. Ussually it bothers me when my allergies are bad. I have what is commonly called hay fever. Or I'm allergic to certain plants and pollens. at times this can start an asthma attack.

And I have what is ussually a minor allergy to cannabis. I wear a mask when I trim varieties like chem dawg, because it affects my breathing. It might be the terpenes but idk. But it's worse early and not bad later as the buds cure.

One night after trimming chem dawg to about midnight in my grow area I came back into our house only to have my wife tell me I had to take her to the hospital emergency because her flu was causing non stop vomiting.

I quickly changed my shirt to hide the stench, (perhaps you smelled fresh chem dawg?) loaded her in my truck and off we went. At the hospital the nurses thought I was the patient, lol. Red eyes i guess, but i was not high at all. Anyway my wife got an iv to rehydrate and an anti nausea shot, and I got questioned as to if I had a medical mj card because I smelled so bad, lol.

The dr didn't press the issue, i explained i had just trimmed a very pungent plant, and this is getting way off topic, but that's my chem dawg story, lol. And yes people do have cannabis allergies, google it, lol.
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
This is part of the reason I've been looking into safe carrier solvents suitable for nebulizing... Dr Sulak says that 90% of asthma sufferers can manage one pull on a vape. I was sucking on MiniVAP when I read that, and I'm not sure a lot of COPD or asthma sufferers would be able to use an MV, which is why there are nebulizers...

Here's the video a kind soul (can't recall which one) posted the other day:
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis and asthma: Dos and don’ts from a patient


ASTHMA

The topic of cannabis and asthma is somewhat infamous among patients as well as within the medical community. Many patients are aware of how cannabis can positively impact their lives. Yet, there is also a general taboo around the subject, due to the effects of the plant and its methods of consumption, as opposed to the nature and symptoms of asthma.


Sensi Seeds has already written about the mechanics of how cannabis can help asthma patients, as well as about the principal properties of cannabis responsible for alleviating asthma symptoms.

In this article, we present you with a range of different tips and tricks to better handle cannabis and asthma.

Meet the patient
Mark is a Dutchman and one of the cannabis experts we have the honour of counting in the Sensi Seeds team. He lives in the Netherlands, where the weather can be very humid, and where pollen and various plant matter is known to fly around, even in big cities, and especially in Spring.

Mark has suffered from asthma all his life, and has been medicating with cannabis for more than two decades.
In order to give a concrete reference to our readers, here are a few details about how Mark handles his condition, and the severity of his symptoms.

Pharmaceutical treatment: Ventolin, 1 puff per day, Flixotide, 1 to 2 puffs per day.

Cannabis treatment: Daily vaporisation of dried cannabis flowers (approx. 2 grams per day).

Physical activity: Mostly sedentary, with daily, average pace walking.

Background: From very severe (daily severe difficulties + frequent attacks + regular visits to ER + antibiotic treatments) to manageable (aforementioned treatment + difficulties once to twice per year).

Due to all these years of self-medicating, Mark has accumulated a large amount of empirical knowledge in terms of what works best when it comes to cannabis and asthma. Read his dos and don’ts below.

Cannabis and asthma: What to do?
Choose vaporising
Cannabis has the potential to alleviate symptoms experienced by asthma patients regardless of the method of consumption. However, this does not mean all of these methods are equal in efficiency. It also does not mean that using any of the least asthma-friendly ones is entirely harmless. Key elements to consider are:

  • Optimal safety
  • Potential for instant relief
  • Controllable dosage and efficiency
Smoking cannabis is still an option, but depending on the severity of your condition, it may escalate an existing asthma-related crisis, or even trigger one. Edibles, on the other hand, because of certain variables such as the time they may take to release their effects, can be used as a long-term treatment, but would not be reliable enough in the case of an attack. This is why for emergency treatments, vaporising is definitely the best option for cannabis and asthma. Not only is the release of cannabinoids in the body close to optimal, the risks for the lungs are at an absolute minimum.

Of course, smoking cannabis is not harmful to the average, healthy human body. However, as an asthma sufferer, you need to watch out for anything that can deteriorate the quality of the chemical elements that enter your respiratory system.

Select the best vaporiser possible
Needless to say, the quality of your vaporiser is of the utmost importance, even if you only use it for recreational purposes. To put it simply, a poorly manufactured or non-adapted vaporiser will not vaporise properly, for instance combusting the substance used rather than vaporising it, making the entire experience fairly pointless.

And of course, if you are using such a vaporiser in the context of a respiratory disease, it could turn out to be a hindrance rather than a source of relief.

Buying pen-like items can be tempting for portability reasons. However, the smaller the vaporiser, the more chances key elements will underperform or simply be absent.
Based on this statement, home vaporisers have a tendency to provide satisfying performances. However, a number of portable vaporisers can also be of use. At Sensi Seeds, we are quite partial to two creations from our friends at Storz and Bickel, and many of us highly recommend them – including Mark, our patient here.

Read more about the Crafty and the Mighty in our webshop:

Crafty Vaporizer

Mighty Vaporizer

Learn how to vaporise cannabis
Consumers that use cannabis for recreational purposes often only have one objective in mind when they start vaporising: to inhale some vapour. And surely enough, this sole objective leads most people to acquire over time a satisfactory method of vaporising.

However, when vaporising for medical reasons, it becomes more of a necessity to not only inhale a sufficient amount of vapour, but also to effectively inhale it while not causing more issues. For instance, a violent coughing fit can make an attack go from distressing to life-threatening in a short amount of time.

Mark’s ultimate method for vaporising: Slow and steady wins the race; take small calm ’hits’ from your vaporizer, as if drinking a thick milkshake. Try to get some sort of calm vaping/breathing rhythm going. One hit from the vaporizer through the mouth, followed by three normal breaths (through the nose if possible). A three to five second vapour inhalation seems good enough, close to 10 becomes too much. Hold the vapour for a second or two and calmly exhale.

Optimise your vaporising experience
Once you have found the vaporiser of your dreams, and you have mastered the vaporising rhythm that suits you best, very little remains in your way. Yet, even the smallest things can become obstacles!
Avoid the most basic consequences vaporising can have on your respiratory system by always having the necessary elements to counter them:

  • Itchy/dry throat: always have a big bottle of water nearby and take sips regularly (do not wait for your throat to itch or until you cough).
  • Go easy on your lungs: start vaporizing at a lower temperature such as 180C. Work your way up if needed, but do not exceed 220C. A flow of air that is too warm is not recommended for your lungs.
  • Inhalation of plant matter: ensure your vaporiser’s accessories include mesh filters to prevent bits from travelling to your lungs, especially if you suffer from hay fever, a common sister disease of asthma.
  • Regarding hay fever: do not rub your eyes after you have handled cannabis flowers
  • Keep your vaping equipment as clean as possible using alcohol and lint-free cloths
Customize your vaporiser with a water pipe
Many vaporisers, especially home vaporisers, have the necessary connections allowing them to be hooked to an additional device. Connect a water pipe to your vaporiser, and vaporise through the warm water. This will help you inhale when your lungs are already in a bad shape.
However, ensure that the water does not get too hot as it could have the opposite effect. If you feel like your lungs are filled with mucus, opt for a dry vaporising session instead. Warm, dry air is good for the lungs.



Choose the best cannabis possible
There is a very wide range of medicinal properties attributable to cannabis. Unsurprisingly, not all cannabis strains are completely beneficial to the vaping asthma patient. Once you have found the perfect vaporiser, it is therefore very important to consider which cannabis strain will benefit you the most, and in which state you should consume it.

Mark’s advice on choosing your cannabis: I prefer well-cured strong indicas, they work best for me, muscle/mind relaxing wise. Cannabis strength depends on the cannabis tolerance of the patient. Fresh weed works less well, there’s too much water in it (for the same reason, do not rely on cannabis oil to medicate). And fresh weed is less strong in effect so you need to consume more. Asthma attacks can be scary, so go for a strain that keeps you calm.

Cannabis and asthma: What not to do?
Don’t smoke tobacco, or even cannabis
Smoking tobacco can be extremely harmful to one’s lungs, mostly on a long term basis. To asthma sufferers, its negative effects can have quite immediate impact.
Depending on the severity of your asthma, it can also be damaging to smoke cannabis. Vaporising can provide somewhat of a similar experience, with virtually no danger.

Don’t use cannabis “dabs” (for medicating)
Dabs are becoming increasingly popular. Medicinal cannabis dabs are also gaining ground, but in the context of asthma, they simply don’t fit the bill. Dabbing does not equate vaporising, as it can potentially expose your lungs to an overwhelming experience. Besides, the potency of most dabs can be a hazard, especially if you are already in a state of major stress and/or anxiety.

Don’t give up on your pharmaceutical treatment
It may be tempting to give up on pharmaceutical drugs altogether, especially when cannabis-induced results exceed expectations. However, existing anecdotal evidence, including this article, is not enough to guarantee safety in all possible asthma-related situations.
Asthma is by nature unpredictable, as it depends on literally hundreds of factors ranging from environmental ones to dietary habits, and even psychological states. Ironically enough, you could even experience a small panic attack following the realisation that your inhaler is not in your pocket, which could in turn trigger an asthma-related issue. Do not underestimate the multiple effects your prescription drugs can have on you, including the placebo effect.

Know your limits
If cannabis, for one reason or another, appears to be aggravating your state rather than improving it, stop consuming it. This could happen for a number of reasons.
Please refer to Mark’s step-by-step method for vaporising, as described above. For instance, if you are inhaling massive vapour clouds because of increasing confidence in your treatment, it could be damaging to your lungs, especially during an attack.

Choose the first time you experiment with cannabis wisely
Waiting until your asthma symptoms manifest to try to medicate for the very first time is not recommended.

Instead, make sure to experiment in a peaceful, safe context, and while you are not experiencing any major respiratory issue. You need to acquire sufficient knowledge about your body, and how it responds to various degrees of cannabis intake. This means that you should be ready to counter any issue that could arise due to your lack of experience: possible coughing, inappropriate dosage, etc. Once you have a clear understanding of how vaporising can affect your breathing, throat and mouth, you can ease into using it to palliate to symptoms such as short breath, wheezing, tightness in the chest area, for recovering after a severe attack, and even to actually counter a full-blown asthma attack.

Don’t prioritise your desire to medicate with cannabis over your life
We understand the thrill of finding a solution to a medical problem that is all-natural, non-invasive, and possibly, overall more efficient. However, in the same way you should never solely rely on an inhaler to keep you healthy and safe, cannabis should not become your lifesaver. Keep your inhalers handy. And if you are experiencing a critical asthma-related issue, don’t try to talk yourself into good health. Try to gage the situation objectively, and if necessary, call a doctor.
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
Cannabis and asthma: Dos and don’ts from a patient


ASTHMA

The topic of cannabis and asthma is somewhat infamous among patients as well as within the medical community. Many patients are aware of how cannabis can positively impact their lives. Yet, there is also a general taboo around the subject, due to the effects of the plant and its methods of consumption, as opposed to the nature and symptoms of asthma.


Sensi Seeds has already written about the mechanics of how cannabis can help asthma patients, as well as about the principal properties of cannabis responsible for alleviating asthma symptoms.

In this article, we present you with a range of different tips and tricks to better handle cannabis and asthma.

Meet the patient
Mark is a Dutchman and one of the cannabis experts we have the honour of counting in the Sensi Seeds team. He lives in the Netherlands, where the weather can be very humid, and where pollen and various plant matter is known to fly around, even in big cities, and especially in Spring.

Mark has suffered from asthma all his life, and has been medicating with cannabis for more than two decades.
In order to give a concrete reference to our readers, here are a few details about how Mark handles his condition, and the severity of his symptoms.

Pharmaceutical treatment: Ventolin, 1 puff per day, Flixotide, 1 to 2 puffs per day.

Cannabis treatment: Daily vaporisation of dried cannabis flowers (approx. 2 grams per day).

Physical activity: Mostly sedentary, with daily, average pace walking.

Background: From very severe (daily severe difficulties + frequent attacks + regular visits to ER + antibiotic treatments) to manageable (aforementioned treatment + difficulties once to twice per year).

Due to all these years of self-medicating, Mark has accumulated a large amount of empirical knowledge in terms of what works best when it comes to cannabis and asthma. Read his dos and don’ts below.

Cannabis and asthma: What to do?
Choose vaporising
Cannabis has the potential to alleviate symptoms experienced by asthma patients regardless of the method of consumption. However, this does not mean all of these methods are equal in efficiency. It also does not mean that using any of the least asthma-friendly ones is entirely harmless. Key elements to consider are:

  • Optimal safety
  • Potential for instant relief
  • Controllable dosage and efficiency
Smoking cannabis is still an option, but depending on the severity of your condition, it may escalate an existing asthma-related crisis, or even trigger one. Edibles, on the other hand, because of certain variables such as the time they may take to release their effects, can be used as a long-term treatment, but would not be reliable enough in the case of an attack. This is why for emergency treatments, vaporising is definitely the best option for cannabis and asthma. Not only is the release of cannabinoids in the body close to optimal, the risks for the lungs are at an absolute minimum.

Of course, smoking cannabis is not harmful to the average, healthy human body. However, as an asthma sufferer, you need to watch out for anything that can deteriorate the quality of the chemical elements that enter your respiratory system.

Select the best vaporiser possible
Needless to say, the quality of your vaporiser is of the utmost importance, even if you only use it for recreational purposes. To put it simply, a poorly manufactured or non-adapted vaporiser will not vaporise properly, for instance combusting the substance used rather than vaporising it, making the entire experience fairly pointless.

And of course, if you are using such a vaporiser in the context of a respiratory disease, it could turn out to be a hindrance rather than a source of relief.

Buying pen-like items can be tempting for portability reasons. However, the smaller the vaporiser, the more chances key elements will underperform or simply be absent.
Based on this statement, home vaporisers have a tendency to provide satisfying performances. However, a number of portable vaporisers can also be of use. At Sensi Seeds, we are quite partial to two creations from our friends at Storz and Bickel, and many of us highly recommend them – including Mark, our patient here.

Read more about the Crafty and the Mighty in our webshop:

Crafty Vaporizer

Mighty Vaporizer

Learn how to vaporise cannabis
Consumers that use cannabis for recreational purposes often only have one objective in mind when they start vaporising: to inhale some vapour. And surely enough, this sole objective leads most people to acquire over time a satisfactory method of vaporising.

However, when vaporising for medical reasons, it becomes more of a necessity to not only inhale a sufficient amount of vapour, but also to effectively inhale it while not causing more issues. For instance, a violent coughing fit can make an attack go from distressing to life-threatening in a short amount of time.

Mark’s ultimate method for vaporising: Slow and steady wins the race; take small calm ’hits’ from your vaporizer, as if drinking a thick milkshake. Try to get some sort of calm vaping/breathing rhythm going. One hit from the vaporizer through the mouth, followed by three normal breaths (through the nose if possible). A three to five second vapour inhalation seems good enough, close to 10 becomes too much. Hold the vapour for a second or two and calmly exhale.

Optimise your vaporising experience
Once you have found the vaporiser of your dreams, and you have mastered the vaporising rhythm that suits you best, very little remains in your way. Yet, even the smallest things can become obstacles!
Avoid the most basic consequences vaporising can have on your respiratory system by always having the necessary elements to counter them:

  • Itchy/dry throat: always have a big bottle of water nearby and take sips regularly (do not wait for your throat to itch or until you cough).
  • Go easy on your lungs: start vaporizing at a lower temperature such as 180C. Work your way up if needed, but do not exceed 220C. A flow of air that is too warm is not recommended for your lungs.
  • Inhalation of plant matter: ensure your vaporiser’s accessories include mesh filters to prevent bits from travelling to your lungs, especially if you suffer from hay fever, a common sister disease of asthma.
  • Regarding hay fever: do not rub your eyes after you have handled cannabis flowers
  • Keep your vaping equipment as clean as possible using alcohol and lint-free cloths
Customize your vaporiser with a water pipe
Many vaporisers, especially home vaporisers, have the necessary connections allowing them to be hooked to an additional device. Connect a water pipe to your vaporiser, and vaporise through the warm water. This will help you inhale when your lungs are already in a bad shape.
However, ensure that the water does not get too hot as it could have the opposite effect. If you feel like your lungs are filled with mucus, opt for a dry vaporising session instead. Warm, dry air is good for the lungs.



Choose the best cannabis possible
There is a very wide range of medicinal properties attributable to cannabis. Unsurprisingly, not all cannabis strains are completely beneficial to the vaping asthma patient. Once you have found the perfect vaporiser, it is therefore very important to consider which cannabis strain will benefit you the most, and in which state you should consume it.

Mark’s advice on choosing your cannabis: I prefer well-cured strong indicas, they work best for me, muscle/mind relaxing wise. Cannabis strength depends on the cannabis tolerance of the patient. Fresh weed works less well, there’s too much water in it (for the same reason, do not rely on cannabis oil to medicate). And fresh weed is less strong in effect so you need to consume more. Asthma attacks can be scary, so go for a strain that keeps you calm.

Cannabis and asthma: What not to do?
Don’t smoke tobacco, or even cannabis
Smoking tobacco can be extremely harmful to one’s lungs, mostly on a long term basis. To asthma sufferers, its negative effects can have quite immediate impact.
Depending on the severity of your asthma, it can also be damaging to smoke cannabis. Vaporising can provide somewhat of a similar experience, with virtually no danger.

Don’t use cannabis “dabs” (for medicating)
Dabs are becoming increasingly popular. Medicinal cannabis dabs are also gaining ground, but in the context of asthma, they simply don’t fit the bill. Dabbing does not equate vaporising, as it can potentially expose your lungs to an overwhelming experience. Besides, the potency of most dabs can be a hazard, especially if you are already in a state of major stress and/or anxiety.

Don’t give up on your pharmaceutical treatment
It may be tempting to give up on pharmaceutical drugs altogether, especially when cannabis-induced results exceed expectations. However, existing anecdotal evidence, including this article, is not enough to guarantee safety in all possible asthma-related situations.
Asthma is by nature unpredictable, as it depends on literally hundreds of factors ranging from environmental ones to dietary habits, and even psychological states. Ironically enough, you could even experience a small panic attack following the realisation that your inhaler is not in your pocket, which could in turn trigger an asthma-related issue. Do not underestimate the multiple effects your prescription drugs can have on you, including the placebo effect.

Know your limits
If cannabis, for one reason or another, appears to be aggravating your state rather than improving it, stop consuming it. This could happen for a number of reasons.
Please refer to Mark’s step-by-step method for vaporising, as described above. For instance, if you are inhaling massive vapour clouds because of increasing confidence in your treatment, it could be damaging to your lungs, especially during an attack.

Choose the first time you experiment with cannabis wisely
Waiting until your asthma symptoms manifest to try to medicate for the very first time is not recommended.

Instead, make sure to experiment in a peaceful, safe context, and while you are not experiencing any major respiratory issue. You need to acquire sufficient knowledge about your body, and how it responds to various degrees of cannabis intake. This means that you should be ready to counter any issue that could arise due to your lack of experience: possible coughing, inappropriate dosage, etc. Once you have a clear understanding of how vaporising can affect your breathing, throat and mouth, you can ease into using it to palliate to symptoms such as short breath, wheezing, tightness in the chest area, for recovering after a severe attack, and even to actually counter a full-blown asthma attack.

Don’t prioritise your desire to medicate with cannabis over your life
We understand the thrill of finding a solution to a medical problem that is all-natural, non-invasive, and possibly, overall more efficient. However, in the same way you should never solely rely on an inhaler to keep you healthy and safe, cannabis should not become your lifesaver. Keep your inhalers handy. And if you are experiencing a critical asthma-related issue, don’t try to talk yourself into good health. Try to gage the situation objectively, and if necessary, call a doctor.
In general a good article, not exactly science, rather one asthma sufferer's experience.

My experience as an asthma sufferer is somewhat diffrerent. One biggy is dabs. I'd much rather do (low temp) dabs when my asthma or allergies are acting up. Low temp dabbing bothers me less than vaping herb. I think part of it is, I just use less to get my desired effect. At times it just makes sense to eat my cannabis.

And although he mentions vaping high end herb, he leaves out terpenes. Something that to me is very important. Those peppery earthy terpenes are not good for me, I do better with the fruity or lemon/citrus type terps. But that's just me and I doubt my condition and usage would be the same for all asthma sufferers.
 

GYOcanada

Member
Low temp solventless dabs all the way! I cured my asthma this way. I used to have it really bad. I couldn't even leave my house without my rescue inhaler without fear I will die from an asthma attack. I was also on a steroid control inhaler but those didn't seem to help all that much. I needed to use them both way more than prescribed.

I agree 100% with @Shredder . Low temp dabs are great for asthma. It's simply the most efficient method of delivery via inhalation. Lots of cannabinoids in one single toke. Vaping flowers was definitely easier on the lungs than combustion but it never helped me fully. My asthma magically disappeared after about a year of low temp dabbing clean homemade solventless extracts. many cannabinoids have natural anti inflammatory properties so steady application to the inside of the lungs can work wonders. It has to be clean though. This is a major problem in cannabis. Too much stuff has been sprayed with pesticides and fungicides. I strongly urge you all to grow your own if at all possible.
 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
I've had pretty serious asthma for years. It can be triggered by heat, cold, allergies, even exercise. I have a Respiratory Alert Service Dog who is Always with me, and two nebulizers at home for when I need higher doses of rescue meds (I was on my way to developing NAS before switching to VAS). For years I went through regular cycles of asthma to bronchitis to pleurisy with frequent bouts of pneumonia. I didn't smoke anything, light candles or fires, grill, wear perfume or use scented products. So, you know, breathing issues.
I didn't smoke long, or much, before I realized I needed to switch to vaping. After I found out what vaping was, that is. It's been almost a year since I bought my first vape. My lungs are better. I didn't get bronchitis or pleurisy last year, my lung capacity has increased, my asthma isn't uncontrolled. I rarely use my rescue inhaler, and my doctor said my lungs sound clear.
I still use asthma meds, but my dosages have been lowered, and one preventative discontinued. I wouldn't use vaping as a rescue, but I do vape, and it seems to help. I prefer lower temps as it's more comfortable and less likely to lead to coughing. As for dabs, I only use rosin from plants we grow so I know there are no pesticides, and I prefer lower temps. So far, no problems or discomfort.
:twocents:
 

Killick

Well-Known Member
I really enjoy reading these success stories. Oddly enough the concept of a rescue inhaler, complete with panic attack issues when realizing you've forgotten to bring it with you, struck a chord with me. I was like that with vapes, back when I was getting off pain meds.

I've made a concerted effort to reduce reliance, and now I tend to use an oil concoction, taking drops sublingua as required. Regular dosing tends to be oil in drinks or food. It's kinda nice saving vaping for evenings...
 

felvapes

Well-Known Member
I have had asthma since I was 2
When a baby and young person I would be hospitalized from it

Had a bad flu in 98 and died from an asthma attack

I smoked weed since I was 12
Smoking weed is no good for asthma
There is benefits, but the smoking negates them

Vaping helps, I have been vaping for near 18 months and it's amazing how much better I breathe and little I use my sprays

I do not thi K that weed is something you can use during an asthma attack even if vaping
It's benefits are not like this and could still irritate when weezing badly

However I do believe that vaping helps the asthma in a preventative manner by relaxing and opening airways as per motg articles

I also think that canna caps is the best way if you are treating asthma alone

I agree that dabbing is better if having a bad few days as it is less breathing in vapour per the effect felt

But again during an actual attack I don't think it will work like a ventolin spray for example

I mean we have two sprays or inhalers usually from doctor

Ventolin (or a few other names) to open up airways by relaxing the muscles that swell up and close the airpath

And a preventer spray like pulmicort or other names

If you take the preventer during an asthma attack it won't help, but if you don't take your preventer you will likely need your ventolin later to stop an attack

I think weed works like the preventers

I occasionally but rarely use my Ventolin now
I rarely if ever need my preventers


Also on the nebuliser posted is what you need if you are having a bad asthma attack and your ventolin does not work

You put a liquid version of ventoliV in the nebuliser and use with a mask so you manage to inhale and absorb the medication better

Much like vaping bud.....
 
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Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
I have had asthma since I was 2
When a baby and young person I would be hospitalized from it

Had a bad flu in 98 and died from an asthma attack

I smoked weed since I was 12
Smoking weed is no good for asthma
There is benefits, but the smoking negates them

Vaping helps, I have been vaping for near 18 months and it's amazing how much better I breathe and little I use my sprays

I do not thi K that weed is something you can use during an asthma attack even if vaping
It's benefits are not like this and could still irritate when weezing badly

However I do believe that vaping helps the asthma in a preventative manner by relaxing and opening airways as per motg articles

I also think that canna caps is the best way if you are treating asthma alone

I agree that dabbing is better if having a bad few days as it is less breathing in vapour per the effect felt

But again during an actual attack I don't think it will work like a ventolin spray for example

I mean we have two sprays or inhalers usually from doctor

Ventolin (or a few other names) to open up airways by relaxing the muscles that swell up and close the airpath

And a preventer spray like pulmicort or other names

If you take the preventer during an asthma attack it won't help, but if you don't take your preventer you will likely need your ventolin later to stop an attack

I think weed works like the preventers

I occasionally but rarely use my Ventolin now
I rarely if ever need my preventers


Also on the nebuliser posted is what you need if you are having a bad asthma attack and your ventolin does not work

You put a liquid version of ventoliV in the nebuliser and use with a mask so you manage to inhale and absorb the medication better

Much like vaping bud.....
I'm glad your asthma is better, @felvapes. Mine is as well. Before vaping, I was going through multiple rescue inhalers a month, frequently using my nebulizer and going to the ER from attacks, taking a daily pill, using two preventative inhalers, was regularly on prednisone to get my asthma under control, and my respiratory alert Service Dog was constantly giving me warnings and alerts. Now my attacks are rare. The pill and one preventative inhaler was dropped, I didn't use my rescue inhaler at all last month, and can't remember the last time I used the nebulizer or prednisone. The dosage on my remaining preventative was cut in half last week, and my pulmonologist is now a stranger to me. My asthma and allergy specialist wants to do testing to see how much my lungs have improved, after we finish testing to see why my allergies have improved so much. I just had blood drawn Monday for the allergy testing, so the respiratory tests will be scheduled soon. The last few times my Service Dog has given me alerts it's been for my asthmatic cat, whom he also feels he's supposed to watch over.
Twice I've started a T-break, just to stop when I started feeling that tightness in my lungs. I figure it's vaping, or going back to the arsenal of medications, round the clock HEPA filters, daily vacuuming, etc. Do I get high? Yup. Am I a stoner? Yup. Is my asthma vastly improved? No question. I'd rather vape, than fear every breath might be my last breath.
 

felvapes

Well-Known Member
I'm glad your asthma is better, @felvapes. Mine is as well. Before vaping, I was going through multiple rescue inhalers a month, frequently using my nebulizer and going to the ER from attacks, taking a daily pill, using two preventative inhalers, was regularly on prednisone to get my asthma under control, and my respiratory alert Service Dog was constantly giving me warnings and alerts. Now my attacks are rare. The pill and one preventative inhaler was dropped, I didn't use my rescue inhaler at all last month, and can't remember the last time I used the nebulizer or prednisone. The dosage on my remaining preventative was cut in half last week, and my pulmonologist is now a stranger to me. My asthma and allergy specialist wants to do testing to see how much my lungs have improved, after we finish testing to see why my allergies have improved so much. I just had blood drawn Monday for the allergy testing, so the respiratory tests will be scheduled soon. The last few times my Service Dog has given me alerts it's been for my asthmatic cat, whom he also feels he's supposed to watch over.
Twice I've started a T-break, just to stop when I started feeling that tightness in my lungs. I figure it's vaping, or going back to the arsenal of medications, round the clock HEPA filters, daily vacuuming, etc. Do I get high? Yup. Am I a stoner? Yup. Is my asthma vastly improved? No question. I'd rather vape, than fear every breath might be my last breath.
I like the idea of a service dog for this wow
I want....
Lol at him looking after the cat too hahahaha

Glad you off the prednisone
That stuff is the worst shit in the world

Works great when you need it but fucks the bodies own immune system etc

The body just shuts off coz we putting steroids in

I've had prednisone for asthma and eczema and other ailments over the years and hate them - also it's so hard to sleep on them

I had an archilles tendon snap and detach because of prednisone too

I also have not had to take them for a long time for my asthma or my eczema

Vaping is so good
We get the meds from weed with out the detrimental side from smoking

So glad to hear of your health improvements @Madri-Gal , I feel we are on the same healing journey ATM

Yes weed gets me stoned, yes I enjoy this
But weed IS a medication for me at the same time for a number of ailments and Vaping makes.it all positive and possible compared to smoking just covering up the problems by getting us stoned
 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
I like the idea of a service dog for this wow
I want....
Lol at him looking after the cat too hahahaha

Glad you off the prednisone
That stuff is the worst shit in the world

Works great when you need it but fucks the bodies own immune system etc

The body just shuts off coz we putting steroids in

I've had prednisone for asthma and eczema and other ailments over the years and hate them - also it's so hard to sleep on them

I had an archilles tendon snap and detach because of prednisone too

I also have not had to take them for a long time for my asthma or my eczema

Vaping is so good
We get the meds from weed with out the detrimental side from smoking

So glad to hear of your health improvements @Madri-Gal , I feel we are on the same healing journey ATM

Yes weed gets me stoned, yes I enjoy this
But weed IS a medication for me at the same time for a number of ailments and Vaping makes.it all positive and possible compared to smoking just covering up the problems by getting us stoned
I agree about the prednisone, @felvapes. It's horrible. I used to have bottles of it on hand in case my asthma got worse. It was one of the meds my Other Son was putting in my food and drinks, and I thought I was going insane from it. He gave me so much, my potassium became dangerously low and I nearly died. I remember lying on the floor waiting for the ambulance, thinking I was dying. I just knew. Blood work confirmed a serious electrolyte imbalance, with extremely low potassium (from the prednisone, but that took some time to figure out, as I wasn't taking prednisone - that I knew of) If it weren't for Madri-Guy getting me help so quickly, I wouldn't be here. My Other Son kept saying, "Oh, she's ok. I think she's been drinking", but I hadn't been.
If cannabis can help me avoid prednisone, I choose cannabis.
 
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