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Meds Crohn's Disease (IBD)

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis Superior To Drugs For Inflammatory Bowel Condition (Crohn's Disease)

Posted on:
Sunday, April 12th 2015
Written By:
Sayer Ji, Founder
GreenMedInfo LLC. This work is reproduced and distributed with the permission of GreenMedInfo LLC.



When drugs fail, and surgery is the only remaining option on the horizon, smoking cannabis may provide an effective and safe natural alternative for the debilitating inflammatory bowel disease known as Crohn's disease.

Crohn's disease is a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease that chronically affects the lining of the digestive tract and is usually resistant to conventional drug-based treatment. Even with treatment the condition generally progresses to the point where surgery is required in 70% of sufferers. Surgery, however, does not usually provide a cure, with 30% undergoing surgery seeing a recurrence of symptoms within three years, and 60% within 10 years.1

Given the poor prognosis of those diagnosed with Crohn's disease, some with the condition have been known to experiment with natural alternatives. At GreenMedInfo.com we have gathered preliminary research on natural interventions for the condition, with probiotics, boswelliaand curcumin (a turmeric polyphenol) top on the list. We have also spent a good deal of time reporting on research indicating that wheat is an inflammatory food to the digestive tract and therefore should likely be avoided by anyone with an inflammatory bowel condition.

One potential remedy for Crohn's disease that we have not yet reported on is cannabis. Animal research already indicates that it can ameliorate colitis, an inflammatory condition of the colon. There is also an established role of cannabis within gastroenterology for the following conditions: "anorexia, emesis, abdominal pain, gastroenteritis, diarrhea, intestinal inflammation, and diabetic gastroparesis."2 Additionally, a retrospective observational study from 2011 found that 21 of the 30 patients who imbibed inhaled cannabis saw significant improvement, with patients requiring steroid treatment reduced from 26 to 4. [view the full PDF here]

These preliminary results set the groundwork for a new study investigating cannabis in Crohn's patients published this month in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology and titled, "Cannabis Induces a Clinical Response in Patients With Crohn's Disease: A Prospective Placebo-Controlled Study." [view the full PDF here]

In the new study -- the first randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study of its kind on the topic -- researchers studied 21 patients (mean age 40) with Crohn's disease who did not respond to drug therapy (steroids, immunomodulators, or anti–tumor necrosis factor-α agents). Patients were randomly assigned to be given cannabis, twice daily, in the form of cigarettes containing 115 mg of (THC) or placebo containing cannabis flowers from which the THC had been extracted.



The study participants were assessed during 8 weeks of treatment and 2 weeks thereafter and saw the following remarkable results:

Complete remission (CDAI score, <150) was achieved by 5 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group (45%) and 1 of 10 in the placebo group (10%; P = .43). A clinical response (decrease in CDAI score of >100) was observed in 10 of 11 subjects in the cannabis group (90%; from 330 ± 105 to 152 ± 109) and 4 of 10 in the placebo group (40%; from 373 ± 94 to 306 ± 143; P = .028). Three patients in the cannabis group were weaned from steroid dependency. Subjects receiving cannabis reported improved appetite and sleep, with no significant side effects. [emphasis added]

The authors concluded cannabis was a clinically effective intervention in 10 of 11 patients:

"Although the primary end point of the study (induction of remission) was not achieved, a short course (8 weeks) of THC-rich cannabis produced significant clinical, steroid-free benefits to 10 of 11 patients with active Crohn's disease, compared with placebo, without side effects. Further studies, with larger patient groups and a nonsmoking mode of intake, are warranted." [emphasis added]

How Does Cannabis Work?
The primary mechanisms through which cannabis exhibits healing properties in Crohn's disease are its immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties:

"Cannabinoids have a profound anti-inflammatory effect, mainly through the CB2 receptor 2]. Cell-mediated immunity was found to be impaired in] chronic marijuana users [6]. A potent anti-inflammatory effect of cannabis was observed in rodents [7]. Studying the functional roles of the endocannabinoid system in immune modulation reveals that it is involved in almost all major immune events. Cannabinoids shift the balance of proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines (towards the T helper cell type 2 profiles (Th2 phenotype and suppress cell-mediated immunity, whereas humoral immunity may be enhanced [8]. Therefore, cannabinoids may be used to treat various inflammatory conditions ,including rheumatoid arthritis." [Source]

For more information on the myriad therapeutic properties of cannabis visit our cannabis research database.

Join the upcoming free webinar on healing leaky gut and immune disorders with Greenmedinfo.com founder Sayer Ji. Register here free.

References
1 http://www.ccfa.org/what-are-crohns-and-colitis/what-is-crohns-disease/crohns-treatment-options.html

2 Naftali, T., Bar Lev, L., Yablekovitch, D. et al. Treatment of Crohn's disease with cannabis: an observational study. Isr Med Assoc J. 2011; 13: 455–458


Sayer Ji is founder of Greenmedinfo.com, a reviewer at the International Journal of Human Nutrition and Functional Medicine, Co-founder and CEO of Systome Biomed, Vice Chairman of the Board of the National Health Federation, Steering Committee Member of the Global Non-GMO Foundation.

Disclaimer: This article is not intended to provide medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Views expressed here do not necessarily reflect those of GreenMedInfo or its staff.
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momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis Treatment For Crohn’s Disease and Colitis

The anti-inflammatory properties of cannabis have proven to be beneficial during studies into cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis.

A 2011 study found that 51% of ulcerative colitis and 48% of Crohn’s disease patients are lifetime cannabis users.

Both Crohn’s disease and Colitis are gastrointestinal disorders that belong to a family of disorders known as Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD).

A recent article in the medical journal, Pharmacology noted: ‘The wall of the gastrointestinal tract houses all components of the endocannabinoid system’.

Studies have shown that the endocannabinoid system is involved in virtually all major immune system functions. IBD patients tend to have more cannabinoid receptors in the tissue of the colon and are more likely to respond positively to the anti-inflammatory properties of cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis, especially within the gut.

Crohn’s disease causes chronic inflammation throughout the gastrointestinal tract and can cause painful swelling from the oesophagus to the rectum.

Symptoms of Crohn’s disease
These can include rectal bleeding, severe abdominal pain and cramping, constipation, persistent diarrhoea and/or a persistent bloated feeling.

Crohn’s is a potentially fatal condition of the gastrointestinal tract involving inflammation, pain, nausea, and often extreme weight loss (the type experienced by sufferers of wasting syndromes like HIV/AIDS).

Scientists believe that Crohn’s is caused by a combination of factors, including malfunction of the immune system, one’s environment, and inherited genetics. It may also be triggered by extreme anxiety.

Ulcerative Colitis
This is similar to Crohn’s disease but only affects the inner layer of the colon. The symptoms can include fever, decreased appetite, weight loss, fatigue and amenorrhoea (loss of menstrual periods in a woman of reproductive age).

Limited treatment is available through diet and prescription medication, however, people suffering often have to manage the condition on their own.

Irritable bowel syndrome
Researchers at the Spire Manchester Hospital in the U.K. recently published a study that found that IBS patients who used the same cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis reported improved diarrhea symptoms and a significant decrease in pain.

Studies

Anterior view, angled to the left hand side, of the gastrointestinal system in a male torso.

In a 2011 retrospective observational study of patients with Crohn’s disease, Naftali et al. found that after beginning medical cannabis use, 21 of the 30 participants had symptoms which had significantly improved and other medications were needed less.

Additionally, 15 of the 30 patients who had needed a total of 19 surgeries between them in a span of approximately 9 years before trying medical cannabis, needed only 2 total surgeries between them in a span of approximately 3 years after treatment with cannabis.

Patients in the medical cannabis group claimed to have improved sleep and appetite without significant harmful side effects.

Additionally, 3 of the 11 patients in the active treatment group were able to reduce or eliminate use of their steroid medications

Subjects had previously failed to respond to standard drug therapy, including steroids, immunomodulators, and drugs such as anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents.


Before (top) and after (bottom) cannabis treatment (colostony images Justin Meader)

Participants in the study were randomly assigned two cannabis cigarettes daily. Some patients received a measured concentration of THC.

The rest received a placebo from which the THC had been removed. The experiment lasted for two months, followed by two weeks of subsequent assessment.

Forty-five percent of the THC subjects achieved complete remission.


Only 10% of the subjects in the placebo group entered remission during the study. A clinical response, defined as a drop in the Crohn’s Disease Activity Index (CDAI) score of more than 100, was achieved in 90 percent of THC subjects.


In contrast, only 40 percent of placebo subjects experienced this level of disease symptom improvement. Furthermore, three patients in the THC group were able to be weaned off steroids.

The test subjects who took THC-rich cannabis twice daily reported improved appetite and sleep, and no significant side effects.

When using cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis the compounds found in the marijuana plant have been shown to play an important part in decreasing gastrointestinal inflammation.

Patients with IBD suffer bouts of vomiting and diarrhea that can result in malnutrition and weight loss

Studies have also found cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis can stimulate the appetite in affected patients, resulting in healthy weight gain and an overall improvement in symptoms.

Results of a survey published in ‘Digestion’ confirmed previous studies that after three months of cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis patients resulted in reports of weight gain and BMI.

They also reported improved general health perception, social functioning, ability to work, physical pain, and depression, and a reduced disease activity index (signalling improvement in the condition).

Cannabis treatment
A study conducted in Israel in 2013 and published in the journal Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology revealed that 45% of human study subjects experienced complete remission of their Crohn’s after eight weeks of 115 mg of smoked THC per day.

The Israeli study revealed no negative side effects of smoked marijuana. If a patient doesn’t wish to smoke cannabis, othermethods of administration consumption avenues such as edibles or vaporization work just as well.

Cannabis treatment for Crohn’s disease and Colitis has been shown to offer a better quality of life, increased ability to perform daily tasks and maintain a social life, with a drastic decrease in pain reduction and anxiety without accompanying side effects.

 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
I have a very old friend....a lady of Jewish ancestry which is telling for Crohn's as it has a genetic aspect to it, who suffered from Crohn's for decades. She had to wear a diaper as she could not control her bowels.

It got so bad, she opted for extreme surgery and now has a colostomy bag and she's glad to have it. The Crohn's was so bad that living with a bag was a relief for her.

Its a tough, tough, disease and the above looks really, really promising.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Using Medical Marijuana for Crohn’s Disease is Often Effective Yet Underreported


Even though research into medical marijuana is drastically limited, more and more studies are coming in to awaken the world to its various benefits. The use of medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease, a debilitating disorder that has proven virtually untreatable for many, is just another way the benefits of this plant are becoming known throughout the country and the world.

The Difference Between IBS and Crohn’s Disease

Crohn’s disease often involves inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract.
Irritable Bowel Syndrome (or IBS) is the broad term used to describe a variety of illnesses that have chronic or recurring immune response and inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The most common types of IBS are ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease. Ulcerative colitis is a chronic gastrointestinal disorder that occurs in the colon (the large bowel) causing a host of painful symptoms. The first is a loosening of the stool that may eventually lead to abdominal cramping, an urgency to have a bowel movement and blood in the stool.

Crohn’s disease is a gastrointestinal condition that relates to chronic inflammation and can affect any part of the gastrointestinal tract, although it most commonly occurs within the small intestine or the beginning of the large intestine. The symptoms include rectal bleeding, diarrhea, abdominal cramping and fever. Both conditions can lead to weight loss and fatigue.

Studying Medical Marijuana for Crohn’s Disease Treatment
Dr. Timna Naftali, an Israeli physician and a leading marijuana researcher in her country, has been studying the effects of medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease for some time now. Her first study was conducted in 2008 and involved 21 long-term Crohn’s disease patients. Half of the patients received two marijuana cigarettes to smoke each day while the other half received a placebo of cannabis flowers that contained no THC. Patients who smoked the marijuana cigarettes showed a marked improvement.

In 2011, however, Naftali achieved much greater goals. Her team used Tikun Olam’s Erez strain to conduct a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. The study, titled; “Treatment of Crohn’s Disease with Cannabis: An Observational Study,” was published in the Israel Medical Association Journal.

“Complete remission was achieved in the control group by 5 of 11 subjects who used cannabis and 1 of 10 in the placebo group,” Naftali explained. “Several were weaned from steroid dependency, and the cannabis group reported improved appetite and sleep … all with no significant side effects.”

Earlier Studies Into Cannabis and Crohn’s Disease

Early studies into cannabis and Crohn’s disease showed it helped with colonic inflammation.
In 2004, the Journal of Clinical Investigationpublished a study titled “The Endogenous Cannabinoid System Protects Against Colonic Inflammation.” The study evaluated the anti-inflammatory benefits of medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease, a condition that is based in chronic inflammation.

In 2005, O’Shaughnessy’s, a scientific journal, published a study called; “Cannabis Alleviates Symptoms of Crohn’s Disease.” 12 patients were interviewed about the effects of medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease. They were asked to describe the effects and how various symptoms such as appetite, pain, nausea, vomiting, depression, fatigue and activity levels were affected. Marijuana was found by patients to be extremely beneficial for treating Crohn’s disease.

How the Properties of Cannabis Treat Crohn’s
Cannabis has been found to treat a number of illnesses for a variety of reasons. Firstly, the powerful anti-inflammatory effects of cannabis have made it beneficial for a whole host of disorders including Alzheimer’s, chronic pain disorders and, of course, Crohn’s disease. It has been used to also treat nausea, pain and depression; all symptoms of Crohn’s disease. There are two major compounds used for their medicinal purposes in marijuana: CBD and THC. While CBD is an effective treatment for inflammation and pain, THC combats nausea and depression. CBD is a non-psychoactive compound in marijuana that does have a relaxing, anti-anxiety effect but will not make you high. THC on the other hand has the psychoactive element in marijuana that produces a euphoric effect. Strains of marijuana and methods of consumption can contain varying amounts of both compounds and there are CBD-only options available as tinctures and oils.

The body contains an endocannabinoid system (ECS) that is made up of receptors all through the body that are responsible for creating homeostasis in the body, regulating mood, appetite, sleep and general wellbeing. Illness and age can contribute to the ECS not functioning at its best. The compounds in cannabis trigger the ECS receptors which in and of itself has the potential to heal a variety of conditions. This may be another reason why many use medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease.

Underreporting of Medical Marijuana for Crohn’s Disease

Patients were found to acquire medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease treatment through unofficial means.
While medical marijuana is legal in 29 states, many of which include IBS on the list of qualifying disorders, not everyone is comfortable being open about their use of medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease. Researchers at Harvard Medical School did a study into the effects of medical marijuana legalization on patients in Massachusetts. They specifically focused on whether the number of people who sought out “medical marijuana” had increased. They surveyed 300 patients with IBS and found that while the number of patients using marijuana had almost doubled from 12 percent in 2012 to 23 percent in 2017, the patients were not using marijuana through official means.

Marijuana treats a large host of ailments and it can be said that all marijuana is medicinal. People use it to self-medicate for all kinds of reasons; from anxiety and depression to IBS, insomnia and cancer. However, researchers proposed that some patients are uncomfortable placing their name on an official registry that may come back to bite them some day. It could be the lingering negative stigma that makes patients afraid of asking their doctor about the treatment options. While many have success using medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease, they may be self-medicating in a private way. Perhaps when the plant has been legalized on a federal level, patients will feel more comfortable. Educating doctors on the benefits of marijuana for a variety of illnesses will allow them to bring up treatment options to patients and remove the stigma.

Nonetheless, many are using medical marijuana for Crohn’s disease and finally getting relief from the debilitating disorder. As more research is done, more education will be available about strains and dosage so that patients can get the best possible care.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
This is based on insufficiently small sample of people, IMO, so I think this study should be taken as encouraging rather than proof of MJ's efficacy for Crohn's.


New research says smoking marijuana causes complete Crohn’s disease remission in 45% of patients


In the United States, according to the Controlled Substance Act:

“[W]hen it comes to a drug that is currently listed in schedule I, if it is undisputed that such drug has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States and a lack of accepted safety for use under medical supervision, and it is further undisputed that the drug has at least some potential for abuse sufficient to warrant control under the CSA, the drug must remain in schedule I.”

As it happens, marijuana is a Schedule I drug. The government says it has a potential for abuse, which it doesn’t, and that it has no accepted medicinal use, which it clearly does.

According to a new study, cannabis has the capability to cause Crohn’s Disease to enter remission in 45% of patients. The study examined 21 people with Crohn’s Disease. Half were given cigarettes without cannabinoids and the other half were given joints to smoke.

The joints contained 23% THC and .5% CBD. 45% of the people given joints every day for eight weeks experienced complete remission of their Chron’s disease. The remainder reported that symptoms were approximately half as severe. They were able to eat and sleep without so much pain.

“Subjects receiving cannabis reported improved appetite and sleep, with no significant side effects,” reports the study.

This is the first time a placebo-controlled trial has been conducted on cannabis and Crohn’s Disease. With any luck, more will follow. Just one more ailment cannabis may cure!
 

pxl_jockey

Well-Known Member
The type of Crohn’s I have is quite rare apparently and is the exact opposite to Crohn’s Disease that most experience. When I have a flare-up, my gut shuts down completely. I mean nothing for days, weeks sometimes; it might not seem like a big deal but it can be life-threatening. For me, cannabis has long been vital along with herbal teas to keep me relaxed & regular. Cannabis somehow stimulates and calms my intestines, preventing cramping and painful spasms from occurring.

Hope this hasn’t been TMI, lol, but I just wanted to raise my hand & share a bit in case there are others who have stories to add. It can be incredibly difficult to talk about IBS, Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s (even in a faceless vapour forum!) but so many suffer from this family of conditions and don’t know how effectively cannabis can regulate and mitigate many of the symptoms associated with these diseases.
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
The type of Crohn’s I have is quite rare apparently and is the exact opposite to Crohn’s Disease that most experience. When I have a flare-up, my gut shuts down completely. I mean nothing for days, weeks sometimes; it might not seem like a big deal but it can be life-threatening. For me, cannabis has long been vital along with herbal teas to keep me relaxed & regular. Cannabis somehow stimulates and calms my intestines, preventing cramping and painful spasms from occurring.

Hope this hasn’t been TMI, lol, but I just wanted to raise my hand & share a bit in case there are others who have stories to add. It can be incredibly difficult to talk about IBS, Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn’s (even in a faceless vapour forum!) but so many suffer from this family of conditions and don’t know how effectively cannabis can regulate and mitigate many of the symptoms associated with these diseases.
Your comment's really touched my heart!
ATAXIA is not known!
It's a autoamune diease !

CANNABIS saved my life!

I had no ideal U suffer as well.
 

pxl_jockey

Well-Known Member
Thanks @ataxian for your words, means more than you know.

Yessir, I’ve got an autoimmune disease, degenerative skeletal disease and the resulting musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain with tinnitus and hyperacusis, and the beat goes on... lol! Some I’ve been dealing with for 30+ years, but the IBS drama for a decade.

I really should get busy on all the relevant “why do you medicate” categories, but it might be too depressing... lol. Tbh, I feel so freaking fortunate in so many (of the really important) ways and try not to let it define me or change my personality and humour or outlook too much. I was given a month to live at age 20, it’s important for me to remember that this is all gravy anyway.

But cannabis definitely makes life more civilised and worthwhile, and I believe kept me free from opioids and pain meds that definitely do change ones personality and they just suck the joy out of life. Cannabis minus fire is the real deal miracle & joie de vivre enhancer.

But then you’re the one who taught us that, Professor!
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
Thanks @ataxian for your words, means more than you know.

Yessir, I’ve got an autoimmune disease, degenerative skeletal disease and the resulting musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain with tinnitus and hyperacusis, and the beat goes on... lol! Some I’ve been dealing with for 30+ years, but the IBS drama for a decade.

I really should get busy on all the relevant “why do you medicate” categories, but it might be too depressing... lol. Tbh, I feel so freaking fortunate in so many (of the really important) ways and try not to let it define me or change my personality and humour or outlook too much. I was given a month to live at age 20, it’s important for me to remember that this is all gravy anyway.

But cannabis definitely makes life more civilised and worthwhile, and I believe kept me free from opioids and pain meds that definitely do change ones personality and they just suck the joy out of life. Cannabis minus fire is the real deal miracle & joie de vivre enhancer.

But then you’re the one who taught us that, Professor!
Your a nice person 4-sure !
I'm trying be nice as well.

You set a beautiful example of how to behave on this PALE BLUE DOT!
 

ClearBlueLou

Well-Known Member
Good, thought-provoking stuff.

The top article mentions boswellin//boswellia, and it is good, but its sudden jump in popularity has rendered it scarce. It is obtained from a scrub tree in the Middle East - the same one from which frankincense is taken. Curcurmin is also very good, and is cultivated in quantity and so vastly cheaper.
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
Good, thought-provoking stuff.

The top article mentions boswellin//boswellia, and it is good, but its sudden jump in popularity has rendered it scarce. It is obtained from a scrub tree in the Middle East - the same one from which frankincense is taken. Curcurmin is also very good, and is cultivated in quantity and so vastly cheaper.
I take both of those suppliments in one capsule from physicians naturals. On my last colonoscopy I had two benign polyps and my mother is a colon cancer surviver. So I gotta keep an eye on this stuff.

Thanks @ataxian for your words, means more than you know.

Yessir, I’ve got an autoimmune disease, degenerative skeletal disease and the resulting musculoskeletal and neuropathic pain with tinnitus and hyperacusis, and the beat goes on... lol! Some I’ve been dealing with for 30+ years, but the IBS drama for a decade.

I really should get busy on all the relevant “why do you medicate” categories, but it might be too depressing... lol. Tbh, I feel so freaking fortunate in so many (of the really important) ways and try not to let it define me or change my personality and humour or outlook too much. I was given a month to live at age 20, it’s important for me to remember that this is all gravy anyway.

But cannabis definitely makes life more civilised and worthwhile, and I believe kept me free from opioids and pain meds that definitely do change ones personality and they just suck the joy out of life. Cannabis minus fire is the real deal miracle & joie de vivre enhancer.

But then you’re the one who taught us that, Professor!
I have a patient that I grow for that has ulcerative colitis. I met him soon after he had a foot of his colon removed. He does pretty good if he takes CBD's regularly. He has had several flare ups since we've met, about 4 years ago, but no hospitalizations so that's good. I'm sure you know about CBD's but just thought I'd mention it.
 

ClearBlueLou

Well-Known Member
Don’t have the luxury of growing in my state so terrible lack of affordable, quality material (so all my experience of CBD has been general cannabis consumption), but also have no IBS/related diagnosis, despite never going a day without Imodium.

I’ve been in the position for most of my adult life to keep green around, but I only really got the message on it as medicine maybe 7 years ago when going through 90-day break and switching from joint to water to vape. That break showed me the part of the aging process I’d been “missing out” on...no, thank you, y’all can have it, I don’t want it.

I really hope that at some point I’ll be able to grow for myself and others. I love gardening and cooking, and wish I had growers quantities to work with
 

pxl_jockey

Well-Known Member
@ClearBlueLou Great post sir and a great point: when cannabis use is medical, not only is a t-break not a good option, it is detrimental. It just kills me when I see, and I have seen it often, someone automatically tells another that she/he should take a good t-break as the solution for almost anything. I’ve seen @ataxian have to explain it multiple times and I guess a purely recreational user might not consider the medical properties of the plant and that it’s amazingly helpful for an incredible number of conditions and diseases. Ah well, I’ll get down off my soapbox now besides rec folks aren’t likely to peruse this thread!

Also, Lou- I went years having gut issues without a diagnosis. Just saying, take good care of yourself because I like your posts.

AND you bring up an idea I’ve had that I haven’t thrown out there because I have only ever thought about it on a personal level:
I wonder if all my years of cannabis use, or at least some of them, weren’t down to a subconscious, body-level, understanding that it was beneficial simply because so many of the chronic conditions I’ve suffered with my adult life now fall into “medical” category?
Maybe not all the rock&roll and metal concerts in the 80’s :headbang: or the folk festivals and Grateful Dead gigs in the 90’s :goofy: but you know, the years where I became a productive, successful member of society that also smoked daily (just on a respectable level).
 

ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
@ClearBlueLou Great post sir and a great point: when cannabis use is medical, not only is a t-break not a good option, it is detrimental. It just kills me when I see, and I have seen it often, someone automatically tells another that she/he should take a good t-break as the solution for almost anything. I’ve seen @ataxian have to explain it multiple times and I guess a purely recreational user might not consider the medical properties of the plant and that it’s amazingly helpful for an incredible number of conditions and diseases. Ah well, I’ll get down off my soapbox now besides rec folks aren’t likely to peruse this thread!

Also, Lou- I went years having gut issues without a diagnosis. Just saying, take good care of yourself because I like your posts.

AND you bring up an idea I’ve had that I haven’t thrown out there because I have only ever thought about it on a personal level:
I wonder if all my years of cannabis use, or at least some of them, weren’t down to a subconscious, body-level, understanding that it was beneficial simply because so many of the chronic conditions I’ve suffered with my adult life now fall into “medical” category?
Maybe not all the rock&roll and metal concerts in the 80’s :headbang: or the folk festivals and Grateful Dead gigs in the 90’s :goofy: but you know, the years where I became a productive, successful member of society that also smoked daily (just on a respectable level).
Funny I loved DAVID BOWIE 70's!
Today I was speaking with my youngest while in the pool. (CALIFORNIA = IRRIGATED DESERT)
We were in a deep ESOTERIC coversation.
We hate you're disease!
CANNABIS is fine.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
We may finally know why marijuana helps people with chronic gut problems


Many people with IBD say cannabis relieves their symptoms, but no one ever really knew why—until now.



As John Mayer tells us (and tells us, and tells us), your body is a wonderland. When it comes to microbial life, this holds especially true for your gut. There, hundreds of residential species eat, breed, and excrete waste. Somehow, your intestines manage to thrive with this zoo inside them—for the most part. In some cases things aren’t so wonderful: your gut starts attacking itself in an autoimmune response that’s bad for microbes and host alike.

People with this condition, known as inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis, face a chronic problem. Current treatment options are laden with side effects and require constant tweaking to remain effective. Some of those people have turned to marijuana for treatment—but their stories about how it has helped them have remained just that, stories, until now. A new study from University of Massachusetts and University of Bath researchers is the first to demonstrate the physical process by which cannabis affects IBD, opening up the possibility of creating new drugs to treat these chronic ailments.

Although numerous IBD patients use cannabis products to help treat their illness, and the phenomena has been subject to some medical research, nobody knew exactly how the medically active parts of marijuana (known as cannabinoids) had an anti-inflammatory effect on irritated bowels before this study. Ironically, however, the researchers weren’t even looking for this precise answer; they just happened upon it in the course of trying to understand how the healthy intestine regulates itself.

In the gut, a thin layer of epithelial cells mediates between our bodies and the microbial “zoo” living within. Beth McCormick of the University of Massachusetts has been studying the role these cells play in regulating the gut microbiome for well over a decade, and the starting point for this current research was her prior discoveryof a chemical pathway by which epithelial cells help neutrophils, a kind of white blood cell, to cross into the gut and eat up some of the microbes. But that was clearly only half of the answer. In order to produce balance, something else had to stop too many neutrophils from getting in and killing peaceful microbes and even the gut itself—leading to IBD.



The answer, reported in the new study out Monday in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, is a different pathway, also in the epithelial cells of the gut lining. That chemical pathway produces substances that prevent neutrophils from getting through the epithelial cells and into the gut. And it turns out those substances, in mice at least, are endocannabinoids. These fatty substances bind to the same chemical receptors as the cannabinoids found in, well, cannabis. Patients missing this secondary pathway “were more likely to develop ulcerative colitis,” McCormick says.

Although the current research is in mice, it points to a possible result in humans as well. It would help explain why cannabinoids seem to provide relief for people with IBD, because they perform basically the same regulatory function as the endocannabinoids would if the body were producing them itself. More research, of course, is needed, but McCormick says it opens up the possibility of creating new IBD treatments that work on the new pathway—including, perhaps, therapeutic agents extracted from marijuana.

And that’s not all, says Vanderbilt University gastroenterologist Richard Peek, who wasn’t involved in the new study. McCormick’s findings “may not just be specific to the intestine,” Peek says. Epithelial cells are found on the surfaces of organs throughout the body, so this mechanism of action may exist in other systems as well, he says. That would change our understanding of autoimmune responses elsewhere in the body, too.

This is good news for the 1.6 million Americans who currently have IBD. But given how common a treatment cannabis is for IBD, some might ask why researchers didn’t look for its mechanism of action in the gut before. That’s partially because cannabis research tends to be politicized, says Peek. He thinks that this discovery may open up new possibilities for the legalization of medical marijuana. For McCormick, their “unbiased approach” was the key to finding this result: they weren’t looking to explain cannabis’s mechanism of action, they just found it. “Sometimes, as they say in the field, the blind squirrel finds the nut,” she says.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

How I Cured My Crohn's Disease Using High THC Cannabis Oil

My name is Mike Wise, and I want to share my story of how I cured Crohn’s disease using cannabis oil produced via the Rick Simpson protocol. Before I get into the details, I would like to share my symptoms with you because throughout my life I have had many friends with similar symptoms. Yours may not be as bad as mine was, but if left untreated it will get progressively worse.

I have always been on the go, an "A-Type" personality as they say. It's hard for me to sit still or remain idle, so my days are never-ending and I am always moving. My entire life has been on the road, traveling constantly; first as a professional skateboarder in my pre-college years then working as a broadcast television camera operator and filmmaker after graduating from The University of Texas. I never really developed good eating habits so eating fast food from drive through restaurants, drinking sodas daily, and taking acetaminophen (over-the-counter pain/headache medicine) were commonplace activities during my life on the road.

It all started around 2001, as an occasional bloating type feeling and general discomfort after meals. At first, a few belches would relieve the discomfort. Then over the years, a few belches after each meal then became dozens of belches during, and after meals, and all throughout the day. The general discomfort turned into sharp chest pains, so sharp that it would cause vomiting. Eventually it got so bad that it would affect my sleep and it became impossible to get more than 4 hours of sleep each night. I would have to eat a snack every 2 to 4 hours or I would become extremely nauseous. My symptoms now affected me during every hour of my life.

I would be nauseous all day, and no longer had an appetite; ever. I had to eat something or the excruciating chest pains would return. Then the vomiting. Every 2 to 4 hours, extremely sharp pains and vomiting... but I could not eat every 2 to 4 hours at night. This is the time which most people sleep. How could I eat if I was asleep? So every night, I would sleep for as long as I could; which was never longer than 2-4 hours. I would wake up, run to the toilet, and vomit. Every morning. This was how I started my day. Every day. I began to live in the bath room. The vomiting became more and more frequent. From once a day, to dozens of times per day. Then came the blood…

Every time I would vomit there would be blood in it. It alarmed me at first, but began to happen so frequently it became normal. Then the diarrhea started. Then that got worse. The diarrhea then began to have blood in it. Occasionally at first, but then the blood became more and more frequent. Every trip away from my home was meticulously planned to keep me within easy access to a toilet every 30 minutes. My life became a series of destinations to different toilets. Everything else was secondary to the disease. It controlled my life... Until I found about about Rick Simpson Oil.

Rick Simpson Oil, RSO, High THC Cannabis Oil, FECO (Fully Extracted Cannabis Oil), Golden Oil, Hemp Oil, Honey Oil, Amber Oil... New names seem to come out every day, but they are all referring to the same thing. An extract produced by washing the resins off the cannabis plant with a solvent, then boiling that solvent off. These are the essential extracts from the cannabis plant. The real medicine. When done correctly, this process will leave you with a pure, clean oil. No coconut oil, mct oil, grapeseed oil, etc. are added when making this oil. These type of oils are known as "carrier oils" and will help to get the cannabinoids into your blood stream more efficiently through "bio-availability". For this reason, I add a small amount of coconut oil into my suppositories (complete process is outlined in my free video, link provided below). I do not dilute my dose with it, but instead add some into my suppository along with my full dose. This is completely different from products sold by most within the "cannabis industry" that I will refer to as a tincture, which are primarily composed out of these carrier oils with very little cannabinoids contained inside.

Please understand that these ingredients are traditionally added to dilute the oil into a nicely packaged "product" developed to be sold to you; not to cure you. During the peak of this protocol you should be ingesting 1000mg of cannabinoids daily, primarily THC. Do not believe the "golden oil" hype: Tinctures which are touted as being better because of their golden oil color which are made completely out of carrier oils and typically contain around 150mg of cannabinoids. You would have to be consuming just under 7 bottles of these tinctures a day to be consuming the necessary amount of cannabinoids needed for this protocol!!

This simple process can be done at home using basic kitchen appliances, and producing the oil yourself is the only way to ensure that you are getting the real thing. I have made a video that is available to watch for free which describes the entire process along with everything you need to know about dosing, and various methods of ingestion.



Around September 2016, I produced my first batch of oil at home using 1 ounce of indica buds and began to ingest the oil. Immediately, I noticed a relief of my symptoms. In an instant, I had regained my appetite and slept a full 8 hours the first night I took the oil. For the first two months, I was so happy with the results I was witnessing that I did not follow Rick's protocol on dosing. Since I was feeling so good mentally and physically, and all my symptoms had subsided; I decided to embark on a cross-country tour with former NFL athlete Boo Williams to promote cannabis through his BooBeary Kares brand.

Everything was going great! We had traveled to about 13 states at this point and were educating people all across the US to the medical benefits of the plant all along the way. Then we got to Canada...

After a series of unfortunate events, I ended up detained in a Canadian jail cell at the border. They eventually let me go and allowed us to continue on our journey after paying a hefty fine, and confiscating my oil. The next week was absolute hell! The combination of not having the oil along with the stress of the incident caused my symptoms to immediately return. Once I got home, I made another batch but still didn't follow Rick's advice for dosing.

Then at the end of November, I flew out to Croatia to film with Rick for a new documentary I am producing. When I was out there, Rick saw the condition I was in (I was still vomiting if I didn't eat every 6 to 8 hours or so at the time) and scolded me accordingly. "For god sake's Mike, take the oil" he would tell me. "It would really benefit you." So after I got back home to Colorado, I made some more oil and began to strictly follow the protocol for the first time. I bring this story up as a reminder to not get complacent as soon as your symptoms subside. It is EXTREMELY important to ingest at least 60 grams of the extracts in 90 days and to then continue a maintenance dose of at least 1 gram per month.

The dosing protocol goes like this: ingesting a rice grain size amount three times a day, then doubling that dose on the fourth day. Every four days until you are taking a gram total per day. Along with following this protocol, I believe that is also very important to switch your diet to one that is referred to as a "high alkaline" diet (google it for more info). Taking out all refined sugars and carbohydrates, and to reduce your stress levels. Removing all sources of stress from your life is also a good idea. I did this for 120 days total, ingesting 90 grams over that time.

Halfway through my regimen, I discovered the importance of ingesting the medicine via suppository. This is the most effective and medically beneficial method of ingesting the medicine. To make the suppositories, I simply go down to the nearest health food store and purchase some empty gelatin or vegetable capsules along with some organic coconut oil. I take them home, open them up, and add a small amount of the coconut oil into the capsule. I then add my dose and use the coconut oil as a lubricant. Simple and clean.

When it was all said and done, I took the first 45 grams orally; then the second 45 grams via suppository in a total of 120 days. My oil was made with 5-6 indica strains mixed together, is full spectrum, and extremely high in THC (50%-95%) and only about 1% CBD. Since March of this year, I stopped taking the oil daily and have been ingesting 1 gram per month as a maintenance dose via suppository. My symptoms have completely subsided since beginning this protocol, and have not returned.

Since I began to make the oil for myself, I have also made it for over 1000 patients around the world. As well as educating hundreds of thousands on how to make it themselves. Every single person has reported positive results for whatever condition they were treating. Everyone who strictly followed the regimen has cured or controlled their disease, just like I have. From brain tumors and cancers (unless undergoing chemotherapy or radiation, patients who have taken those pharmaceutical poisons will most likely need to consume a gram a day, for the rest of their life), to Alzheimer’s, COPD, Lyme, chronic pain, various skin conditions, addiction issues, etc., etc., etc. The list goes on and on. Cannabis Saves Lives. Prohibition needs to end. Now!!
 

Shredder

Dogs like me
That's a lot of RSO. I know folks that do well with ulcerative colitis, and IBD with substationally less oil. But everyone that i know with gut issues, says that the oil works very well for them. And with the amounts suggested that would make a lot of people cannatonic, lol. And speaking of cannatonic, I think some CBD in the mix is a benefit, seeing as its anti inflammatory.

And while I haven't heard about using rosin instead of RSO I believe it would work just as well, and maybe better since more terpenes are intact in it.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
Cannabis and Crohn's Disease

Crohn's disease is an autoimmune disease that causes severe irritation and inflammation in the digestive tract. A form of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the condition often develops in young adults between the ages of 20 and 29 and has no known cure.

Complications from Crohn's disease include intestinal obstruction or fistulas, abscesses, ulcers, and ultimately malnutrition as the body is not receiving adequate nutrients.

Prescription medications are frequently used to treat Crohn's patients, but they come with a host of side effects, such as chronic pain and respiratory infection.
Cannabis has demonstrated effectiveness in treating other autoimmune diseases, such as lupus and rheumatoid arthritis, but could it provide the same advantages to patients with Crohn's disease?

Current Research

Emerging studies and clinical trials are beginning find just how effective cannabis can be in the treatment of Crohn's disease and IBD. Thus far, peer-reviewed clinical studies remain limited, but early findings have proven to be encouraging for those Crohn's disease patients who have exhausted other treatment options.



Researchers are beginning to glean how cannabis may relieve symptoms of Crohn's disease. (Photo via Shutterstock)

The Studies
A literature review published in the journal Gastroenterology and Hepatology in 2016 discussed the therapeutic use of cannabis in patients with IBD. Researchers concluded that “a significant portion of IBD patients, particularly those with severe disease, use cannabis to relieve symptoms of pain, nausea, and appetite and to improve their overall mood.”

A clinical trial, which is currently underway at the University of Illinois at Chicago is investigating how oral cannabinoids could help individuals with Crohn's disease. Researchers plan to enroll 36 participants and treat some with a daily capsule containing 25 milligrams of CBD for 12 weeks and others with a placebo capsule to compare the results.

While this trial is in progress, some Crohn's disease patients have already pinpointed a symptom reliever in cannabis.

Patient Perspectives

Popular “Saturday Night Live” cast member and comedian Pete Davidson, 25, was diagnosed with Crohn's disease as a teenager. Davidson had attempted to treat his condition with nutritional therapy and the prescription drug Remicade, but neither provided him with any relief. Then, he said he started smoking cannabis and finally noticed an improvement in his symptoms.

“I have Crohn's disease, so it helps more than you can imagine,” Davidson said in reference to cannabis a SiriusXM interview with Howard Stern on Sept. 24, 2018.
Another young man with Crohn's disease has discovered similar success through medical cannabis use. A teenager named Coltyn, 19, who prefers to use his first name only, moved from Illinois to Colorado in 2014 to gain legal access to medical marijuana. Prior to the move, Coltyn had also tried Remicade, which he says led to the development of serum sickness, which is a hypersensitivity similar to an allergy. Other medications had also failed and caused extreme side effects, such as nose bleeds and joint pain.

“After the first three years of pharmaceutical medication, all the doctors were trying to do was mask my disease, he told Healthline in an October 2017 interview. “I really wanted to find a solution that would help me, and cannabis not only relieved the pain, but it also relieved the inflammation in my intestines and stopped my Crohn's from having flares.”

Medical researchers who have been studying the use of cannabis for Crohn's disease can confirm the medicinal benefits that Davidson and Coltyn experienced firsthand.

Expert Perspectives

Dr. Timna Naftali, a gastroenterology specialist at Tel Aviv University's Meir Hospital in Israel, led a study that offers a bright glimmer of hope to Crohn's disease patients.
“We know that cannabinoids can have profound anti-inflammatory effects, but this study indicates that the improvement in symptoms may not be related to those anti-inflammatory properties,” Naftali said in a 2018 interview with Medical News Today.



Medicinal uses of cannabis, particularly extractions that contain THC and CBD, are being studied as a therapy for Crohn's disease. (Photo by Gina Coleman/Weedmaps News)

In the study, researchers found that cannabis had no effect on gut inflammation in the participating Crohn's disease patients. However, cannabis was found to produce clinical remission and elevated quality of life in up to 65% of patients after eight weeks of treatment. Alongside a placebo, the specific treatment administered included a cannabis oil containing 15% CBD and 4% THC.

While presenting the results of the study at the 2018 United European Gastroenterology meeting in Vienna, Austria, Naftali said:
“There are very good grounds to believe that the endocannabinoid system is a potential therapeutic target in Crohn's disease and other gastrointestinal diseases.”

The Bottom Line

As recent research suggests that symptoms of Crohn's disease may improve or even go into remission for a majority of patients who use medical cannabis, the overall outlook for future treatment is positive. However, there remains a need for further research on how marijuana can be used to benefit those who suffer from this debilitating condition.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
I thought this was an interesting editorial...

How I use THCa to treat crohn's disease

After a battery of tests and misdiagnoses, I was finally diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease twelve years ago, and thus began a long battle with trial-and-error medical treatments. I changed my diet several times, even though my doctors didn’t seem confident it would change much (it didn’t), went to physical therapy for pain-related issues, and took so many different pharmaceuticals I can’t even begin to recall each and every one. My days were foggy due to side effects from pharmaceuticals, such as steroids, that made me feel worse than I did before I even took them, writes Diana-Ashley Krach.

Crohn’s Disease (CD) is a chronic autoimmune disease that falls under the umbrella of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD). The severity of the symptoms can shift at any given time, alternating between flare-ups and periods of remission, when the disease is manageable. A “trigger” (a mental or physical event that suddenly exacerbates symptoms) can cause either a minor flare-up (maybe resulting in flu-like symptoms) or a severe flare-up that results in a hospital stay and surgery. The cause of CD is still unknown, though there is evidence that it's rooted in genetics, or environmental factors that can influence its onset.

Symptoms of CD include severe abdominal pain and cramping, persistent diarrhea, rectal bleeding, anal fissures and fistulas, ulcers, abdominal inflammation, weight loss, and appetite suppression. It affects the entire digestive tract, from mouth to anus, and can impact areas outside the GI tract, as well. Those complications can also lead to painful joints, osteoporosis, kidney stones, rare liver conditions, vision changes, and skin problems. There is currently no cure for CD, though traditional treatment involves pharmaceuticals that can result in worse-off side effects like Lupus and exaggerated symptoms.

I was frustrated from the pharmaceuticals' side effects, and feeling stressed from the financial strain of spending hours in doctors' offices and hospitals every month, when I finally decided to change my routine. I began experimenting with alternative medicine by using things like probiotics, kratom, and valerian root to manage my symptoms, and found that I was struggling less and able to manage my CD in a more productive way. Over time, I have augmented my regimen, and am still always looking for natural ways to treat my illness. And so, I was excited to find that a certain cannabinoid could really help: THCa.

THCa (THC-acid) is a non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in raw cannabis flower that converts into THC with the introduction of heat. Through the process of decarboxylation (applying low heat for an extended period), which happens when cannabis flower is cooked, vaped, or smoked, the THCa becomes THC. In addition to other non-decarboxylated plant material like leaves and stems, raw flower can be used for juicing and reaping the benefits of THCa, which include anti-proliferative properties that can slow cancer growth and disease progression.

THCa also has neuroprotective properties, which can be useful for those with Crohn's, since “brain fog” is a major concern. One study found that people with the disease have 10 percent slower cognitive response times than the average healthy population. The study also found a strong correlation between "brain fog" and abdominal pain, active inflammation, and fatigue.



I became aware of THCa a couple years ago, but didn't realize it could be used as a treatment for CD until I interviewed Katie Stem, CEO of Peak Extracts, for my podcast Your Highness. Like me, Stem also has Crohn's Disease. To manage her symptoms, she relies on a variety of remedies, including Chinese herbs (she’s a licensed herbalist and acupuncturist), an anti-inflammatory diet, acupuncture, and a couple supplements.

She also uses her background as a scientist to make cannabis products that could help someone with this complex condition. Without making any medical claims, Stem has a deep understanding of how THCa could help treat IBD, and with that knowledge she created a THCa tincture through Peak Extracts.

With experience in the fields of physiology, pharmacology, and natural products and pharmaceutical interventions at Washington State University and Oregon Health and Science University, Stem developed her THCa tincture using a special process. “We use CO2 extraction, which is under intense pressure, but we keep everything cold so that the sensitive terpenes, flavonoids and lipids don't degrade during our process," she explained. "The result is much like an extra virgin olive oil — as close to the plant as we can get, while leaving things like chlorophyll and cellulose behind.”

In her ongoing search for anti inflammatory agents to add to her personal routine (a lot of the pain from CD is from inflammation), Stem became aware of THCa and its potential in that arena. After a particularly bad flare-up last winter, she noticed more relief when she vaporized flower at a low temperature. When she found promising studies mentioning THCa and IBD, she began doing more research about how it differs from other cannabinoids.

By systematically withdrawing the THCa from her routine, she can isolate the benefits to her health. Stem continues to experiment with the dosage of THCa she consumes, but currently takes the following in one dose (repeated one to six times a day depending on pain levels): 1ml 22:1 CBD:THC Tincture (12mg CBD + 0.5mg THC) and 5 drops of THCa Tincture (1.5mg THCa + 0.75mg THC).

"I've noticed that during a flare-up, if I don't consume [THCa] at all, the next day I have more pain and cramping in the morning," she said. "I've found it to be helpful with abdominal spasm and cramping, especially right after a bowel movement."

Occupational medicine specialist Dr. Um V.A. Dhanabalan (MD, MPH, FAAFP, MRO) seconds the opinion that THCa can help with abdominal spasms, bloating, inflammation, peristalsis (involuntary constriction of muscles), diarrhea and constipation. The decarboxylated version of THCa works well for CD, she says, because it is easily absorbed. Furthermore, she adds that THCa can help CD patients with sleep, relaxation and overall quality of life when used with other cannabinoids like THC.

When Stem told me how THCa could possibly help CD, I purchased Avexia’s Black Raspberry Road THCa 1000 MG tincture (I couldn’t purchase Stem’s tincture because it’s only available in Oregon and I live in Maryland) from a local dispensary. The tincture consists of extracted THCa and MCT oil.

So far, I have been taking it for about four months, and can see a noticeable difference when I use it as directed. I’m not dragging nearly as much in the morning, and I’m able to approach my day with more focus. What helps even more is how the tincture reduces the stomach cramping I usually experience in the morning (and sometimes at night) that keeps me from being as productive as I want to be. The strong anti-inflammatory benefits of THCa are what keep the cramping at bay and the pain manageable.
For me, when my stomach is cramping and seizing throughout the day, being hungry is not the issue – it’s the fear of how each food item will affect my system. When my symptoms flare up, I avoid eating much, because I know that certain foods can make the situation much worse. Treating my CD holistically has been working well for me, but I still have minor flare-ups from time to time, and the pain and stomach seizing are the most difficult symptoms to treat naturally.

While we still need more research around THCa, the evidence that does exist is promising. And even if you aren’t searching for THCa specifically, you may already be experiencing the benefits of this compound, says Stem.

“Anyone who smokes or vaporizes (non-distillate) oils is already consuming THCa, just not in a controlled way," she said. "If you've noticed that smoking flower or raw extracts gives you better benefits than other methods of consumption, it's possible that THCA is already a big part of the benefits you're enjoying."
 

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