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Baron23

Well-Known Member
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ataxian

In a BLACK HOLE!
I agree. Would they do the same thing if you reeked of cigarettes (like ALL people that smoke them do)?

Or garlic? Or..... ? I can think of a host of smells a lot more offputting.
I 1977 in WAKIKI the police caught me smoking a joint of MAUI WOWIE without seeds.
He did not write me a ticket?
Night clubbing was fun & entertaining back in time!
At least CIVILIZED society was attained d?
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
Michigan will benefit a lot from the cannabis taxes. It will benefit even the people that own the anti cannabis businesses I’m sure.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Here's how you can get your marijuana-related criminal convictions expunged in Michigan


More than two years after Michigan voters approved marijuana for adult use, residents convicted of many pot-related crimes that have now been legalized have an opportunity to expunge them from their records.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed a sweeping "clean slate" package of bills in October that will automatically expunge some criminal records in 2023, while others have to be applied for. On Monday, Attorney General Dana Nessel announced a new website where Michigan residents can learn about how to begin the process expunge the marijuana-related criminal records that require an application.

"Michiganders voted to legalize recreational marijuana use years ago," Nessel said in a statement. "Residents should rightfully be able to eliminate convictions for actions that are no longer considered a crime in our state."

According to the new website, "a person convicted of 1 or more misdemeanor or local ordinance marijuana crimes may petition the convicting court to set aside the convictions if they were based on activity that would not have been a crime after December 6, 2018, when a 2018 voter-passed initiative to legalize recreational use of marijuana in Michigan went into effect."

The website explains the requirements, including a checklist of eligible misdemeanor marijuana offenses. Additionally, a person convicted of one or more criminal offenses including felonies (but not more than a total of three felonies) may petition to expunge the convictions.

Applicants need to provide their full name and current address, as well as a certified record of each conviction that the applicant is seeking to expunge.
The application must be filed either by mail or in person in the court where the conviction occurred.

A court may or may not require the applicant to appear before a court.

More information will be added to the website as it becomes available.

Marijuana convictions can be a barrier to accessing jobs, loans, housing, education, and some public resources. The racist War on Drugs has had a disproportionate impact on people of color despite the fact that white people use marijuana at about the same rate as others.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Michigan's legal marijuana industry hits record sales, buoyed by new products


Bully Kush, resin-coated moon rocks, lemon ginger gummies, cannabis-infused peanut butter, and wedding cake distillate. This ain't your grandpa's weed.

As Michigan's legal marijuana industry continues to blossom, dispensaries are offering an eclectic array of products, from meticulously grown flowers to delicious edibles and potent tinctures.

Recreational and medical marijuana sales in the state hit a record $115.4 million in March, a more than two-fold increase over March 2020, according to Headset, a company that analyzes cannabis consumer trends. There were 1.4 million transactions in March.

In 2020, the first full year of legal recreational sales, dispensaries rang up more than $500 million in purchases.

"Michigan's cannabis market is still growing," Cooper Ashley, a data analyst at Headset, tells Metro Times. "It flattened out a bit in late 2020 but appears to be trending up again."

Although the state allowed dispensaries to stay open during the COVID-19 pandemic, legal cannabis consumption declined late last year. But in early 2021, sales not only rebounded, they began to soar to record levels.

That growth is expected to continue in April as people celebrate 4/20, the national holiday for cannabis culture. During the week of April 20 last year, medicinal and recreational sales grew 48% over the previous four weeks in Michigan, despite the pandemic, according to Headset.

"I'd say that we should expect at least as big of a response this year, but I know the weather in Michigan can be pretty variable this time of year, so that will probably be a fairly influential factor on 4/20 celebrations and shopping," Ashley says.

As the legal industry grows, Michigan-based companies are churning out new products that are changing how cannabis is consumed.

Michigan leads the nation with the highest market share of edibles. In March, 14.4% of total recreational and medical cannabis sales were for edibles.

One of the leaders is UBaked, a Burton-based company that grows high-quality flower and makes concentrates, sublingual sprays, and delicious edibles. Its cannabis-infused candy-bar line includes peanut butter, chocolate mint, cookies 'n' cream, strawberry crunch, orange creamsicle, root beer float, dark chocolate cherry (with Michigan cherries!), and a Suberbaked bar that tastes like Michigan's famous Superman Ice Cream.

Their new gummy line, which premieres this week, includes pink lemonade, blue raspberry, cherry lime, tropical fruit, orange, cherry lime, and lemon ginger.

"We like the variety to keep it interesting," Amy Beauchamp, co-owner of UBaked, tells Metro Times.

UBaked's resource and development team includes a food scientist and a technician who are working on hard candies, gum, suppositories, beverages, and skin care products. They're also working on micro-emulsion to make their products faster-acting.

UBaked's flower products are also popular, with crystal-coated strains like Sluricane, cherry goji, apple fritter, skunk piss, ice cream cake, gelato 33, Oreoz, and apple tart. Another top-selling product is live resin, a concentrate for dabbers and vapers.

"Our flower and concentrates always do well," Beauchamp says.

Michigan is expected to enter the beverage market soon. In January, the Michigan Marijuana Regulatory Agency announced a new process that will allow companies to manufacture and sell THC-infused beverages.

Michigan now has 410 medical cannabis dispensaries and 260 recreational marijuana shops. The growth continued in 2021, with Michigan issuing licenses for 46 new medical cannabis dispensaries and 45 new recreational marijuana shops.

While the growth of the cannabis industry has been strong, its full potential has been stymied by communities prohibiting the sale of recreational marijuana. Fewer than 100 of the state's 1,764 communities permit recreational marijuana sales.

In Detroit, the state's largest city, recreational dispensaries and cannabis consumption lounges are expected to open in a few months. The city barred new recreational marijuana businesses until it could develop an ordinance to ensure that longtime residents weren't squeezed out by outside profiteers. A federal judge, however, ordered the city last week to temporarily halt processing licenses for recreational marijuana businesseswhile he considers a lawsuit challenging the city's "legacy" ordinance that gives priority to longtime residents.

For communities that embraced recreational marijuana dispensaries, the rising sales are welcome news. In March, the state doled out nearly $10 million to municipalities and counties from excise taxes generated from recreational sales in the 2020 fiscal year. Communities receive about $28,000 for each dispensary.

"Infusing over $28,000 per retailer and micro business into local government budgets across the state is very impactful and shows how strong and successful the industry is becoming," Andrew Brisbo, executive director of the state's Marijuana Regulatory Agency, said in a statement.

The excise tax also generated about $11.6 million for schools and $11.6 million for roads.

Oz Cannabis is one of the faster-growing dispensaries, which has cannabis shops in Detroit, Ypsilanti, Bay City, and Traverse City. In the next several months, it plans to open new dispensaries in Owosso, Pontiac, and Meridian Township.

Jamie Garmo, a member of Oz Cannabis' executive team, said product diversity is a key part of the business. Its dispensaries sell flowers, edibles, topicals, tinctures, concentrates, and vapes.

"There is a lot of sophistication in these products now," Garmo tells Metro Times. "People don't want to get high just go get high. They want to enjoy what they are doing. It's part of the experience."

It's not just products that have become more sophisticated, but the processes that go into making them, as well. A new cannabis dispensary and grow operation that claims to be Detroit's largest is set for a grand opening on April 20.

Leaf and Bud is located on Livernois Avenue, tucked around the corner behind the Value Save grocery store not far from the Avenue of Fashion and the University of Detroit Mercy. Despite its unassuming location, inside is a dispensary with a sleek, modern feel. The long showroom is flanked by two curvy, neon-accented countertops, and on a recent visit, workers were in the process of stocking the counters with a variety of products, including those from Future Grow Solutions, which shares a space in the 140,000-square-foot building.

Leaf and Bud and Future Grow Solutions are separated by a security gate. But over at the grow operation, there's a similar futuristic feel.

The space houses rows of Future Grow Solutions' "CropTowers," 11-foot-tall towers that the company's master cultivator, Billy Zangoulos, says uses a "hyperponic" system to grow cannabis plants that shortens the vegetation cycle by weeks. Each tower holds 102 plants, which are suspended in the air and surrounded by lights.

"We can take a clone from a mother, we can develop roots on that plant, and then we can put that plant directly into flower at a smaller size," Zangoulos says. "We're surrounding that whole tower with LED light. So we've sort of saved money on the power consumption with the modern lighting, and we've skipped like a two- to three-month life cycle that would be required in a traditional grow."

Zangoulos says it's the largest vertical 360 grow operation in the state.

"It's all computer-controlled," he says. "It's all water-fed, no dirt, no mess. It's a very clean approach to it."

Zangoulos says he started growing cannabis in 2008, when Michigan voters approved medical marijuana.

"I got into it because I had medical issues," he says. "I have Crohn's disease. So I was one of the first thousand patients in the state of Michigan to get a card. And from that day, my life changed."

Zangoulos says he's amazed at how far the industry has come since then. When he saw the sophisticated grow operation at Future Grow Solutions, "I couldn't not say yes," he says.

"It's awesome," he says. "Every day you go in and you smile and you sing to your girls, and I say hi and make sure they're fed."
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

Michigan GOP lawmaker wants to create a marijuana blood-level limit for drivers


A Michigan lawmaker wants to specify how much of the intoxicating chemical contained in marijuana can be in someone's blood in order for that person to bedeemed a dangerous driver.

The measure introduced Wednesday by Rep. Pamela Hornberger, R-Chesterfield Township, is a controversial move that contradicts the recommendations of a state commission created under former Gov. Rick Snyder that studied the concept of THC blood levels and intoxication.

Recreational marijuana is legal in Michigan, and it's already illegal to drive while intoxicated in the state. But marijuana intoxication is not defined in the same way as alcohol intoxication; if someone has a blood-alcohol concentration of .08 or higher, that person is legally considered too drunk to drive.

The bill, HB 4727, essentially aims to craft a similar number for marijuana intoxication. That limit would be 5 nanograms per milliliter of blood. A nanogram is one-billionth of a gram.


In a statement, Hornberger said she is working with Macomb County Prosecutor Peter Lucido on the measure. Hornberger is running to fill the state Senate seat Lucido gave up when he was elected prosecutor in the fall.

The bill comes in response to the death last year of a girl in Warren. Liliani "Lily" Leas was hit and fatally injured by a vehicle driven by a family member.

“We have to ensure there are appropriate punishments in place when drivers make the misguided decision to put the lives of others in danger by driving under the influence of THC,” Hornberger said in a statement.

“This legislation unfortunately won’t undo what happened to Lily Leas, but I’m hopeful it will prevent future tragedies.”

The driver, Nichole Leas, had THC in her system, according to the Macomb Daily. Representatives for Hornberger and Lucido did not immediately respond to questions about how much THC was in Leas' system.

In January, Leas pleaded no contest to a moving violation causing death, according to the Daily.

“Modifying the existing Motor Vehicle Code to incorporate a marijuana threshold will make our roads safer and provide an invaluable tool for law enforcement in investigating and prosecuting marijuana driving cases," Lucido said in a statement.

The commission determined it's very hard to accurately find someone's THC intoxication level based on a roadside or blood test. While breath testers can be used to determine whether someone is drunk (these are also controversial), there is no widely recognized comparable and established test for THC. The Michigan State Police had a pilot program to test oral swabs as of 2019.

Everyone's body processes THC very differently, the commission noted. A heavy marijuana user may have a THC level that far exceeds 5 nanograms per milliliter but not actually be impaired, whereas a newer or more limited user may have a lesser amount and be severely impaired.

By the time a blood test could be taken, the amount of THC in a person's body could also be very different than at the time that person was driving, the commission noted.

Instead of setting a firm limit, the commission recommended law enforcement use field sobriety tests already in use to determine whether a driver is drunk.

As of late 2020, six states had nanogram limits on THC blood content. Those limits ranged from 1 nanogram per milliliter of blood to 5 nanograms, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

The number of drug-involved crashes in Michigan increased from about 2,000 in 2013 to 2,880 in 2017 before decreasing to 2,600 in 2019, according to a reportfrom the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute. There were almost 10,000 alcohol-related crashes the same year, the university found.
 
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momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member

10th recreational marijuana shop opens in Grand Rapids


GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The 10th recreational marijuana dispensary has opened in Grand Rapids.

High Profile, located just on the Grand Rapids-Kentwood border at 2321 44th St. SE, began its first sales of recreational marijuana this week.

“With the Michigan adult-use market booming, we’re thrilled to now offer our curated selection of premium cannabis products at High Profile to recreational consumers in Grand Rapids, Kentwood and Wyoming,” said Ankur Rungta, CEO of Ann Arbor-based C3 Industries, which owns the High Profile chain.

“Whether long-time cannabis connoisseurs or new to the plant, our experienced budtenders can help consumers find the best products to fit their needs and desires.”

The Grand Rapids High Profile location opened in October 2020 as a medical marijuana provisioning center. With its conversion to adult-use recreational Wednesday, it has become the 10th dispensary in the city.

The dispensary is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day of the week.

One-eighth of an ounce of marijuana flower at the dispensary is billed at about $35 to $60 depending on the strain. In addition to marijuana flower, the dispensary also offers pre-rolled joints, edibles, vape cartridges, concentrates and more.

Along with its Grand Rapids location, C3 Industries has dispensaries in Ann Arbor, Buchanan and Grant in Michigan and plans to continue expansion throughout the state.

“With Michigan as our home, we look forward to bringing six more High Profile locations to the state throughout 2021, expanding convenient access to quality flower and products as demand continues to surge,” Rungta said.

The company also has stores planned in Missouri and one open in Oregon.

The other recreational marijuana dispensaries in Grand Rapids are:
  • PharmHouse Wellness at 831 Wealthy St. SW
  • Fluresh at 1213 Phillips Ave. SW
  • Michigan Supply & Provisions at 2741 28th St.
  • Michigan Supply & Provisions at 1336 Scribner Ave.
  • 3Fifteen Cannabis at 2900 S. Division Ave. SE
  • 3Fifteen Cannabis at 3423 Plainfield Ave. NE
  • Exclusive Brands at 2350 29th St. SE
  • Joyology at 3769 28th St. SE
  • Gage Cannabis Co. at 3075 Peregrine Drive NE
 

arb

Semi shaved ape

10th recreational marijuana shop opens in Grand Rapids


GRAND RAPIDS, MI -- The 10th recreational marijuana dispensary has opened in Grand Rapids.

High Profile, located just on the Grand Rapids-Kentwood border at 2321 44th St. SE, began its first sales of recreational marijuana this week.

“With the Michigan adult-use market booming, we’re thrilled to now offer our curated selection of premium cannabis products at High Profile to recreational consumers in Grand Rapids, Kentwood and Wyoming,” said Ankur Rungta, CEO of Ann Arbor-based C3 Industries, which owns the High Profile chain.

“Whether long-time cannabis connoisseurs or new to the plant, our experienced budtenders can help consumers find the best products to fit their needs and desires.”

The Grand Rapids High Profile location opened in October 2020 as a medical marijuana provisioning center. With its conversion to adult-use recreational Wednesday, it has become the 10th dispensary in the city.

The dispensary is open 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day of the week.

One-eighth of an ounce of marijuana flower at the dispensary is billed at about $35 to $60 depending on the strain. In addition to marijuana flower, the dispensary also offers pre-rolled joints, edibles, vape cartridges, concentrates and more.

Along with its Grand Rapids location, C3 Industries has dispensaries in Ann Arbor, Buchanan and Grant in Michigan and plans to continue expansion throughout the state.

“With Michigan as our home, we look forward to bringing six more High Profile locations to the state throughout 2021, expanding convenient access to quality flower and products as demand continues to surge,” Rungta said.

The company also has stores planned in Missouri and one open in Oregon.

The other recreational marijuana dispensaries in Grand Rapids are:
  • PharmHouse Wellness at 831 Wealthy St. SW
  • Fluresh at 1213 Phillips Ave. SW
  • Michigan Supply & Provisions at 2741 28th St.
  • Michigan Supply & Provisions at 1336 Scribner Ave.
  • 3Fifteen Cannabis at 2900 S. Division Ave. SE
  • 3Fifteen Cannabis at 3423 Plainfield Ave. NE
  • Exclusive Brands at 2350 29th St. SE
  • Joyology at 3769 28th St. SE
  • Gage Cannabis Co. at 3075 Peregrine Drive NE
35 to 60 a eight!?!
Goddamnitman........way to guarantee a thriving black market forfuckingever.
:facepalm2:
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
The MI prices for 1/8 looked kinda spendy. I usually pay between $40 - 45 for a really high grade. Usually if you are over 55 you get a discount of 5%. If you pick the right day of the week many stores around my area in WA they have weekly specials on waxes and flowers. I pay $36 -$ 40 for a gram of concentrates on a regular day.

I still enjoy the feeling of going into a cannabis store remembering the days of meeting my black market friend. Worried at any moment he would get busted. Glad I wasn’t there when he did.:angel2:

I edited the above the prices I pay for concentrates.
 
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