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Meds The Cannabis Strain Guide

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
Came upon this guide on Leafly. Is your favorite on here? I gotta lotta love for some Golden Goat. https://www.leafly.com/news/strains-products/top-100-marijuana-strains

View attachment 18582
I see they are still not letting go of the outdated indica-sativa-hybrid paradigm. I wonder how long it's going to take.
I've been happy with those on the list that I've tried, and am slightly surprised at how many I have tried. Not going to go through the list, however. If I can't trust the classification, then it's not my list.
 

Squiby

Cool Kitty
Staff member
My all time favourite is Durban Poison. It's great for getting stuff done. But I wouldn't turn my nose up at most any of them under any category. I have some Blueberry hash which has become a clear afterhours favorite. Back when I used to socialise with other human beings, Pineapple Express was really very nice.
 

Madri-Gal

Well-Known Member
Boy, was I ever cranky! Plumbing problems today, and it seems to have soured my mood. Plumber can't make it for days.
So, I will revise my earlier statement. While I don't care for the categorization, I love lists. I love lists, and even if I didn't, I would love the list @bulllee posted. I'd buy the poster and frame it, and for sure I'd try everything on the list. Twice. At least.
Going to start right now...with whatever this is in this jar. I'm sure it's on the list somewhere.
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member

I'm a Blue Dream fan. I love the high, it's like slippin into your favorite jeans. very comfortable. :aaaaa:

Blue Dream Cannabis Strain History and Information


Tuesday July 14, 2020
By Paul Barach

Blue Dream Cannabis Strain History and Information

Growing Blue Dream. This hugely popular strain’s name pretty much tells you all you need to know about what you’re getting into. Like the strains Green Crack, Strawberry Cough, and Sour Diesel, Blue Dream is one of those buds that offers some real truth in advertising. Perhaps that is why Blue Dream consistently tops the yearly lists of most popular cannabis strains in both individual states like Colorado as well as across the entire United States.
So how did Blue Dream rise to this exalted position amongst its countless peers? Where were the seeds that would grow into Blue Dream originally planted? What has made it such a popular strain? Let’s find out.


Blue Dream Strain Origin and History
While the origins of Blue Dream are a little hazy, there is a lot that we know for certain. The seeds that would become Blue Dream were first planted in the soil of the sleepy surf town of Santa Cruz. This idyllic beach community that stretches into Monterey Bay on California’s Central coast is home to some of the best surfing and best surfboard makers in the world. It was also one of the centers of the medical marijuana community. In the early 1990’s, local activists began leading the medical cannabis movement by founding the Wo/Men’s Alliance for Medical Marijuana (WAMM). This trailblazing patient’s rights organization was the first cannabis collective to receive non-profit status in the US. Its co-founder Valerie Corral helped to lead the passage of Prop 215 in 1996, which made California the first state to legalize medical cannabis.

Santa Cruz

Blue Dream first dates back to the surf town of Santa Cruz. photo credit

With all of this cannabis culture centralized in one spot, some innovative grower decided to crossbreed California’s indica heavy, fruit-forward DJ Short’s Blueberry F5 with the sativa heavy, citrusy, spicy Haze local to Santa Cruz.
Once the plant flowered, that first grower must have known that they already had a bona fide cannabis classic on their hands. Aft, Blue Dream’s buds are a forest of dense, deep green leaves and rich golden hairs accented by frosty white trichomes that shimmer over the plant.
Effects, Appearance, and Aroma
Just as enticing as the bud’s appearance is the smell wafting off it from Blue Dream’s over-productive terpenes. The strain definitely takes after the Blueberry side of the family upon first whiff. The scent has been described as a sweet and floral berry that retains subtle notes of a sharp citrus-sandalwood retained from its Haze parentage. The flavor itself is similarly blueberry heavy, although some strains can lean heavier on the floral notes which imparts it with a hint of lavender.
Then, there’s the effects. Blue Dream opens with an uplifting and cerebral high that come mostly from its Haze parentage. While some users have found it to be a little racy during the first few minutes, the effects soon evolve into bursts of creative energy that can be intermixed with some scatterbrained distortion. There are also bouts of unrestrained euphoric uplift that are more than welcome in the mix. Blue Dream is widely regarded as a fantastic daytime strain for its thought-provoking, mind-expanding creativity and energetic, inspirational focus.

Blue Dream

With such great effects, appearance, and aroma it's no surprise that Blue Dream is such a popular strain.

Growing beneath all this cerebral motivation is a profound body relaxation and quality pain relief. This only continues as the Blue Dream experience continues on until it becomes more of an indica finish, leaving the consumer warm and relaxed with a floaty sense of ease.
It’s this hard-to-find combination of body relaxing, pain relief, and motivating, energizing focus that originally brought Blue Dream into the spotlight amongst Santa Cruz’s medical marijuana community. While Blue Dream is a great beginner strain that never loses its appeal for veteran cannabis consumers, it’s the wide-ranging and influential medical community that usually catapults a strain to national popularity. In this case, Blue Dream is known by some as the “Aspirin of Cannabis” for its ability to relieve headaches, body aches, chronic pain, nausea, stress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia. It’s a perfect daytime strain that helps you get through your tasks with a clear and pain-free focus, then gets you to bed for a restful eight hours of sleep.

How Did Blue Dream Become Prevalent?
From its Santa Cruz origins, Blue Dream spread across the state to quickly become one of the most popular and recognized strains in California. From there it made the jump in first the illegal, then legal markets to states like Washington and Colorado. Once there, it rapidly rose to the top of the charts as far as popularity and stayed there. Thanks to its voluminous trichome production and simplicity of mass production, Blue Dream is also a favorite for use in vaporizable concentrates as well as a base in edibles.
Besides its popularity, Blue Dream is also a favorite of cannabis producers for just how easy it is to grow.
While it’s a great strain for any weed fan looking to branch out and see how green their thumbs can be, in the hands of even a moderately skilled grower Blue Dream provides remarkably high yields. Despite its slow start, Blue Dream makes up for it by branching out quickly and flowering in about 9-10 weeks. The plant is known to grow larger when produced via hydroponics. However, anyone looking for quality over quantity will use the soil, since that is where Blue Dream’s flavor ripens the sweetest. As an added bonus, the plant also has a natural resilience against powdery mildew.
As with anything in popular culture, Blue Dream’s popularity has also led to it having some detractors. Because it is so ubiquitous and easy to produce, the genetics of a lot of plants being sold as Blue Dream are beginning to seem a little questionable. Some consumers are reporting a much heavier indica effect than initially promised, or find it to be more racy than uplifting. Others view it derisively as “Beginner’s Weed” and talk down any fan as not having as distinguished a “pot palate.” Still, others just say that it’s played out; a “been there, done that” strain that everyone’s still talking about as though it just hit the scene.
However, cannabis is incredibly personal, and there’s no reason not to like what you like just because its enjoyed the world over. After all, there’s a reason Blue Dream retains its stellar reputation and consistent five-star reviews: it’s really great weed. What more do you need to say about it than that? The name speaks for itself.
Have you ever tried Blue Dream before? If so, how did you like it? Comment your experiences below.
 

Basement Farmer

Well-Known Member
IME strain availability seems to be consistent between vendors. Probably based on grower supply I imagine? Or maybe it's just what works best for big canna.

BD seems to be quite common around here. GG4 is the other most common one.

The scene has definately changed since the last time I bought product (2013 & medical) It seems like White Widow was everywhere at that time.

I guess I'm a bit of a skeptic when it comes to 'guides' on the physical attributes of different strains. Like anything psychoactive that is consumed, effects will very greatly between individual metabolisms. Also individual grows can greatly effect qualities of their products. The guides tend to throw around generalities a bit much too when it comes to words.
 

treesaver

New Member
Is there any place that I can search strains by cbd/thc ratio? I would like to find something with a decent balance. I find so many strains that have really high THC, and low or almost no CBD. It doesn't have to be 1:1, but a reasonable amount of CBD along with THC has become a necessity for me. Any suggestions where I can find such a reference?
 

Disrupt

Well-Known Member
Is there any place that I can search strains
Seem to recall you're planning to grow?

Seedsman seed bank lets you filter by both THC and CBD content. Grew out a Barney's Peppermint Kush after reading about its high CBD content there. (Didn't notice much difference in effects.)

100% germination rate from Seedsman, far more freebies than purchased seeds, and steathy shipping - included a reusable book safe!
 
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CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
Is there any place that I can search strains by cbd/thc ratio? I would like to find something with a decent balance. I find so many strains that have really high THC, and low or almost no CBD. It doesn't have to be 1:1, but a reasonable amount of CBD along with THC has become a necessity for me. Any suggestions where I can find such a reference?
THC levels are all over the place depending on the plant. You can have a granddaddy Purp at 18% THC or another batch of plants at 28%. I would imagine it would be that way with CBD. We have legal cannabis here. I will find the same brand and strain with different THC levels even within a store.

  • Predicting Cannabis Strain Effects From THC and CBD Levels
    Nick JikomesMarch 23, 2017



    Whether you’re an adult-use consumer looking for a specific kind of high or a medical patient seeking symptom relief, the THC:CBD ratio will strongly affect your experience. As Leafly has explored previously, CBD is able to diminish some of THC’s effects because it interacts with receptors in the brain very differently than THC does.
    The psychoactive effects of cannabis depend on THC’s ability to activate the CB1 receptor. The presence of CBD changes THC’s ability to activate CB1 receptors and laboratory studies in both animals and humans, which tells us that CBD can diminish some of THC’s effects (Figure 1). This is a big reason why a balanced strain like Harlequin or Cannatonic will hit you very differently from THC-dominant strains like Blue Dream, Sour Diesel, or Northern Lights.
    THC vs. CBD at the CB1 receptor

    Figure 1: The psychoactive effects of cannabis depend largely on THC’s ability to activate CB1 receptors in the brain. Left: Activation of CB1 receptors by THC in the brain triggers many of the classical effects of cannabis. This includes pleasant effects like euphoria and relaxation and side effects like short-term memory impairment and anxiety, especially at higher doses. Right: CBD does not activate the CB1 receptor. Instead, CBD interferes with THC’s ability to activate the CB1 receptor, which can decrease some of THC’s side-effects. (Amy Phung/Leafly)

    THC and CBD aren’t the only things that matter. Strain effects will also depend on the presence of other compounds, like terpenes. Nonetheless, the THC:CBD ratio is a huge factor in how a strain will affect you. Can we anticipate any general effects from the THC:CBD ratio alone?
    Predicting Likely Strain Effects
    It is well established that CBD does not have the psychoactive effects that THC does. When people take pure CBD, even at very high doses, it is well tolerated and produces no obvious intoxicating effects. We also know that when in the presence of CBD, some of THC’s effects are reduced. CBD won’t erase THC’s psychoactive effects, but the effects will be different.
    Cannabis connoisseurs will be well aware of the general differences between the effects of THC-dominant vs. balanced strains, and will want to dig deeper into strain information (e.g. terpene levels). Novice cannabis consumers, by contrast, should start by understanding the basic differences between balanced vs. THC-dominant strains before worrying about further subtleties or experimenting with the more potent cannabis products.

    Figure 2: Cannabis strains can be grouped into three broad categories based on their THC:CBD ratio. THC-dominant strains have significant THC levels but negligible CBD. Balanced strains contain significant levels of both THC and CBD, but generally less THC than THC-dominant strains. CBD-dominant strains (hemp) contain significant CBD levels and negligible THC. See thisarticle for more information. (Amy Phung/Leafly)

    Balanced strains like Harlequin or Cannatonic will still get you high, but your experience will be noticeably different compared to THC-dominant strains. Based on what we know from scientific studies, the effects of balanced strains may differ from THC-dominant strains in the ways listed below.
    Important caveat: The differences listed below are based on what we know about THC and CBD from human and animal studies. They’re the ways we can reasonably expect the effects of balanced strains to differ from THC-dominant strains based solely on their THC:CBD ratios. The presence or absence of other compounds will likely influence the effects of specific strains and products. The list below should be viewed as a basic introduction to plausible differences between balanced and THC-dominant strains. It should not be considered a definitive guide to how every single strain will affect you.
    You May Be Less Likely to Experience Anxiety With CBD Strains vs. THC-dominant Strains
    Studies in both humans and animals indicate that CBD can have anti-anxiety effects. Studies in humans have observed that CBD can diminish the anxiety provoked by a stressful situation (like public speaking) or the paranoia and cognitive impairment provoked by THC administration. Laboratory studies in animals also generally find that CBD reduces behavioral measures of anxiety.
 
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Disrupt

Well-Known Member
I've sprouted seeds three years old. I store my seeds vacuum sealed in a Mason jar in a cool dark basement.
Good to know that vacuum-sealing is okay. Always afraid to try.

Refrigerator works too, just be sure to avoid condensation when removing the jar. No problems germinating after several years. Most of the freebies are in the freezer for long-term storage. At one plant per year, a lifetime supply.
 

Basement Farmer

Well-Known Member
Looking at some reliable seed vendors, it's hard to find ones that let you buy just a couple of seeds. I don't have a lot of room, and my budget isn't epic. Shipping is pretty costly. I did find some strains from the search though. How long do the seeds last typically?
I had about a 1/3 germination rate on some 6 year old seeds that I had from back when I carried a license. I managed to get 5 plants from 15 seeds....4 of them were male and the remaining one tuned hermaphroditic (maybe due to the age of the seed?)....I cloned the herme and just made sure I chopped early enough so that it didn't pollinate. It was fine.

Most of them were Subcool Genetics seeds, which were on the pricey side, but I always had good germination and fem rates with their products. Not sure if they are around anymore.

As I recall, 5 seeds were $50 back then....seemed steep, so decided clones were a better deal. $25 for a female plant that you could take cuttings from without the worry of failure.
 

treesaver

New Member
Well, after milling around what my options are, I think the best thing for me to do is to just buy a clone locally. There are some good reliable folks here, good weed, and germination rate is 100% on a clone ;) and someone else does that part of the work. About $30 for a plant.

It's still hard to find something THC/CBD balanced, but I did track down Pennywise at a wholesaler, they helped me find a dispensary they service near me to see if I can get a special order for the strain. They do have Remedy strain in stock, which is high CBD, but almost no THC. Harlequin is in stock at a local group of grower who also specifically do custom orders. Couple of other dispensaries have clones, but I would have to contact them for what they have in stock.

This is probably my best bet. I still have a good bit of preparation to do before the next growing season, but I want to have the source of the plant secured, so I'm not scrambling to find something when it's time.

I hope to learn how to make clones too so I can just continue planting.
 
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Basement Farmer

Well-Known Member
Well, after milling around what my options are, I think the best thing for me to do is to just buy a clone locally. There are some good reliable folks here, good weed, and germination rate is 100% on a clone ;) and someone else does that part of the work. About $30 for a plant.

It's still hard to find something THC/CBD balanced, but I did track down Pennywise at a wholesaler, they helped me find a dispensary they service near me to see if I can get a special order for the strain. They do have Remedy strain in stock, which is high CBD, but almost no THC. Harlequin is in stock at a local group of grower who also specifically do custom orders. Couple of other dispensaries have clones, but I would have to contact them for what they have in stock.

This is probably my best bet. I still have a good bit of preparation to do before the next growing season, but I want to have the source of the plant secured, so I'm not scrambling to find something when it's time.

I hope to learn how to make clones too so I can just continue planting.
Good call

Growing from seeds is rewarding but success isn't guaranteed and for me getting from seed to seedling was always the most challenging and stressful time.

Maybe if you have an unlimited source it wouldn't be bad, but with clones you're still way ahead of the game as far as timelines go. Plus you can be sure you're not wasting your time and valuable lamp space bringing males all the way to flower.

Once you have a healthy plant (or more) it's smooth sailing. Cannabis as a plant is very robust with a little care.

Have fun but beware.....you're going to wind up with more plants than you intended to have.
 

treesaver

New Member
Growing from seeds is rewarding but success isn't guaranteed and for me getting from seed to seedling was always the most challenging and stressful time.
I actually really love germinating seeds, the part that really doesn't sit well with me is not having a reliable and trusted source. Seems a lot more people sell clones than seeds. I will be saving some time though for sure, plus I can support my local growers!

Have fun but beware.....you're going to wind up with more plants than you intended to have.
Well, that would be a good thing, I like sharing my flowers with the bees! :) I hear they love cannabis!
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
A new study reveals that high-potency weed won't actually get stoners any higher than regular weed

Impairment not much different for study participants who used high- and lower-THC cannabis products

While the generally held assumption is that high-potency weed — say with a lofty THC count — will produce a higher high, a new study suggests that isn’t actually the case.

Researchers from the University of Colorado, Boulder looked to see if physical and cognitive impairment among regular cannabis users varies based on THC blood concentration. Touted as the first study to assess the acute impact of cannabis among real-world users of legal market products, it involved randomly assigning higher- or lower-THC products to 121 users. Participants used weed they had bought on their own and consumed it in their homes before being tested.

Beyond drawing participants’ blood, their mood and intoxication levels were assessed, and their cognitive function and balance tested before, directly after and an hour after they had consumed weed.

The findings?

Smoking high-potency marijuana will boost blood levels of THC more than twice as much as conventional weed, but it doesn’t get you higher.

“Surprisingly, we found that potency did not track with intoxication levels,” said lead author Cinnamon Bidwell, an assistant professor in the Institute of Cognitive Science. “While we saw striking differences in blood levels between the two groups, they were similarly impaired.”

High-potency cannabis users showed similar neurobehavioral patterns to regular users, as well as comparable verbal memory and postural stability.

“People in the high concentration group were much less compromised than we thought they were going to be,” says co-author Kent Hutchison, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the university. “If we gave people that high a concentration of alcohol it would have been a different story,” Hutchison says.

It’s not clear why there wasn’t greater intoxication among the concentrate group. Possible factors include tolerance or genetic differences that make some users metabolize THC more quickly. Or it may be that once cannabinoids “fill receptors in the brain that spark intoxication, additional cannabinoids have little impact,” the researchers note.

Despite the lack of differences in high- and low-THC cannabis, Bidwell says the findings indicate that using concentrates could unnecessarily put people at greater long-term risk of side-effects. “It raises a lot of questions about how quickly the body builds up tolerance to cannabis and whether people might be able to achieve desired results at lower doses.”

Maybe lower-potency, cheaper weed is a better bang for the buck.
 

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