Sponsored by

PuffItUp Dynavap VGoodiez 420EDC
  • Welcome to VaporAsylum! Please take a moment to read our RULES and introduce yourself here.
  • Did you know we have lots of smilies for you to use?
  • Need help navigating the forum? Find out how to use our features here.

Lunacy COVID-19

bulllee

Well-Known Member
It's crazy in AZ, They knew ahead of time that we would be peaking in June but they go ahead and reopen on May 20, it's like people don't give a shit down here. Bars are still open. We are at 86% capacity for hospital beds. They keep telling us that were covered and they have plans to ride this out. JAJAJA. What a huge waste of time and money. They should have waited and done it the right way before reopening. They knew this would happen.
Don't trust the Government on anything




https://www.eatthis.com/bars-shut-d...ain-texas-florida&utm_campaign=etntNewsletter

These Two States Just Shut Down Bars Again with No Reopening in Sight
Governors react as numbers of new COVID-19 cases reach record highs.

JUNE 26, 2020
closed sign

If you live in Texas or Florida, you won't be going out to a bar to celebrate the end of lockdown any time soon. The governors of these two states announced all bars are mandated to immediately shut down again due to a surge in COVID-19 cases.
According to the state health department, Florida's new coronavirus case count doubled to 9,000 over the last 24 hours. Halsey Beshears, the secretary of Florida's Department of Business and Professional Regulation, announced in a tweet that Florida is "suspending on premises consumption of alcohol at bars statewide." Whether or not bars can keep selling alcoholic beverages for takeout remains unclear.
Texas isn't faring much better, being one of the main contributors to a new U.S. record of almost 40,000 new cases reported on Thursday. The decision to shut down all bars in the state came early this morning, as governor Greg Abbott pointed to gatherings at bars as one of the main culprits for growing infection numbers in the Lone Star State. "At this time, it is clear that the rise in cases is largely driven by certain types of activities, including Texans congregating in bars," he said.

Establishments that earn more than 51% of gross receipts from sales of alcohol are mandated to shut down on-premise operations immediately, but they can stay open for takeout and delivery. Restaurants in Texas are staying open as well, but will have to roll back their capacity to 50%. The governor declined to provide a timeline for reopening of bars again.


The two states started reopening in early in May
It's worth noting that Texas and Florida were among the first states to begin reopening in early May. In Florida, the stay-at-home order expired on April 30, and the state immediately decided to reopen their beaches. Restaurants reopened at limited capacity in early May, while bars were allowed to reopen at half capacity starting June 5. Stay-at-home orders in Texas expired on May 1. Restaurants were allowed to reopen on May 1 and increase capacity to 75% by June 12, while bars were operating at 50% capacity since June 3. Sign up for our newsletter to get the latest coronavirus news delivered straight to your inbox.
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
Besides the respiratory issues that leave patients gasping for breath, the virus that causes COVID-19 attacks many organ systems, in some cases causing catastrophic damage.

“We thought this was only a respiratory virus. Turns out, it goes after the pancreas. It goes after the heart. It goes after the liver, the brain, the kidney and other organs. We didn’t appreciate that in the beginning,” said Dr. Eric Topol, a cardiologist and director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute in La Jolla, California.

In addition to respiratory distress, patients with COVID-19 can experience blood clotting disorders that can lead to strokes, and extreme inflammation that attacks multiple organ systems. The virus can also cause neurological complications that range from headache, dizziness and loss of taste or smell to seizures and confusion.

(CNN)At least five states Friday reported single-day records of Covid-19 cases, adding to the growing concern over case tally spikes that has sent many states backpedaling on their reopening plans.
Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Tennessee and Utah all reported their highest-ever daily caseloads, according to their state's health departments. And Florida, seen possibly as the next US epicenter, beat that record again Saturday with 9,585 cases.
And it is not just those states seeing rising numbers. The national number of daily coronavirus case reports reached a new high Friday as well, at almost 40,000, according to data from Johns Hopkins University, and 32 states are seeing the number of new cases grow from the prior week.
US reports highest number of new coronavirus cases in a single day
US reports highest number of new coronavirus cases in a single day

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis told reporters Friday that "nothing has changed in the last week" and the surge was the result of a "test dump."

But the governor of Texas, the nation's second most populous state, "paused" his state's phased reopening plan and ordered further restrictions on businesses including bars.

I think if I had been hanging out in bars and protesting I would want to get a covid test just to see if I was a carrier. I might have no symptoms, don’t want to transmit it to others. IMO it’s your duty as being a good person. Still no mandate in FL to wear masks. Hey they just closed bars in FL.
We are mandated in WA state to wear masks around others in public. I have no problem with that.
 
Last edited:

Helios

Well-Known Member
Cases in FL. Have exceeded 130,000
@CarolKing bouncing off what vu posted, CV acts eerily similar to HIV infection.
 
Last edited:

voyciz

Active Member
How much do you know about viruses ? What's your expertise that you can say your not threat to others? Obviously you don't know anything about what's going on in AZ. People on this forum seem to know. So wearing a mask makes you suffer? :rofl: I hear you, those straps really tickle. Mighty presumptuous of you to bring in my media habits when you don't have a clue who I am.
I don't claim to be an epidemioligist, just a realist. I'm in CA, one state over from you, I have family in Los Angeles...everyone with a brain around here realizes just how much this is being hyped up, and how ridiculous it is. I already explained to you how wearing a mask takes away your individuality, but let me continue. As humans, the face is the most unique part of your body, and by wearing a mask, we all look alike, and do not look human really at all. Living in AZ heat, you must know how hard it is to breathe with a mask on. Restricting the airflow to your lungs is NOT healthy, and I don't need to be a scientist to know this, just like I don't need to hit myself in the hand with a hammer to know that it will hurt. And, you obviously watch too much news, because you have been sucked in. Eventually you will see the light my friend.

Americans feel entitled to do what they want regardless of the circumstances whether it was smoking cigarettes inside or wearing a seatbelt. Some maybe too young to remember. What about liability insurance for your car? We never want anyone to tell us what to do, even if it means when it’s at the detriment of our own health or the health of others. It came down to mandating rules regarding our health, people didn’t like it. I worked in a building where everyday somebody would take down the no smoking sign in the elevator or write “fuck you” on the sign. People were up in arms they couldn’t smoke at their desks any longer. I remember the blue haze in the office, we were all expected to breathe it in without complaining. It wasn’t that long ago that folks could still smoke in restaurants, remember the smoking sections? What a joke that was.
Unfortunately, America was built on tobacco. That was the primary purpose of the Colonies. When roots run deep, they are hard to pull out. By the way, the great Mrs. King is an American and would not appreciate your racist remarks.

https://www.azdhs.gov/preparedness/...se-epidemiology/covid-19/dashboards/index.php
This is the from yesterday. If you check it out go to confirmed Covid 19 cases by day and check out the chart. Gov. Ducey reopened the state on May 20 and it's been downhill ever since. Arizona has three times as many positive tests among people age 20 to 44 as it does in any other age bracket, according to state data. Numbers don't lie. Some of the hardest hit are on the reservations in the state, the Navajo are are enforcing sundown to sunup curfews, and roadblocks.
OK, now show the other numbers that go along with that, and you will have a more complete picture. Your numbers are one-sided. How many of those 20 year olds actually died, and how many recovered and are now immune, which is the goal in the end anyway right? We are working towards a vaccine for immunity, but there is also natural immunization that occurs. And, once again let me remind you: positive test results are directly related to the number of tests being performed. Number of positive tests, on its own, means jack diddly nothing.
 

bulllee

Well-Known Member
I don't claim to be an epidemioligist, just a realist. I'm in CA, one state over from you, I have family in Los Angeles...everyone with a brain around here realizes just how much this is being hyped up, and how ridiculous it is. I already explained to you how wearing a mask takes away your individuality, but let me continue. As humans, the face is the most unique part of your body, and by wearing a mask, we all look alike, and do not look human really at all. Living in AZ heat, you must know how hard it is to breathe with a mask on. Restricting the airflow to your lungs is NOT healthy, and I don't need to be a scientist to know this, just like I don't need to hit myself in the hand with a hammer to know that it will hurt. And, you obviously watch too much news, because you have been sucked in. Eventually you will see the light my friend.



Unfortunately, America was built on tobacco. That was the primary purpose of the Colonies. When roots run deep, they are hard to pull out. By the way, the great Mrs. King is an American and would not appreciate your racist remarks.



OK, now show the other numbers that go along with that, and you will have a more complete picture. Your numbers are one-sided. How many of those 20 year olds actually died, and how many recovered and are now immune, which is the goal in the end anyway right? We are working towards a vaccine for immunity, but there is also natural immunization that occurs. And, once again let me remind you: positive test results are directly related to the number of tests being performed. Number of positive tests, on its own, means jack diddly nothing.
:rofl: :rofl::rofl:
 

CarolKing

Always in search of the perfect vaporizer
@voyciz not sure what you mean by saying I had racist remarks? I resent that and I think you need to go through the rules again. I won’t be commenting on any of your posts any longer. You are trying to cause discord instead of having a conversation about a very important subject. Stay safe in CA.

I would get a test if I had gone to any large gathering. Especially since in some of those states the virus has blown up. That would include going to a political rally, large graduation party or marching for Black Lives Matter or any large group of people. I haven’t been around a large group of people other than at the grocery store and then I wear a mask. We just went to stage 3 where I live. They allow 50% of folks at a restaurant but I’m not ready to do that until things are a lot safer. I will buy food to go.
 
Last edited:

Stevenski

Enter the Dragon
Staff member
Living in AZ heat, you must know how hard it is to breathe with a mask on. Restricting the airflow to your lungs is NOT healthy, and I don't need to be a scientist to know this, just like I don't need to hit myself in the hand with a hammer to know that it will hurt.
No. I don't know what you mean. It is simply not true. Not in any way, shape or form. It is completely different to hitting your hand with a hammer. I am no scientist either but I listen to them. Let me guess helmets are a freedom infringenent too?


By the way, the great Mrs. King is an American and would not appreciate your racist remarks.
And what remarks are they? If you are going to accuse someone of that kind of thinking I suggest you quote them.


How many of those 20 year olds actually died, and how many recovered and are now immune, which is the goal in the end anyway right?
I am more interested at how many of the recovered immune 20 year olds will face a lifetime of complications from covid19.
 

momofthegoons

Vapor Accessory Addict
Staff member
By the way, the great Mrs. King is an American and would not appreciate your racist remarks.
This is a baseless comment and I don't blame @CarolKing for being resentful of it. There are a few things I wont tolerate on this forum... and this type of 'name calling' is one of them. There was no reason to attack her character with your comments. And anything further along that line will earn you a warning point here.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Cases in FL. Have exceeded 130,000
That's .6% of FL's population. I don't mean in any way to try to minimize the danger of COVID or the need to take precautions for ourselves and those we interact with.

But I do think its very helpful to put these type of numbers in context.
 

Squiby

Cool Kitty
Staff member
I am no scientist either but I listen to them.
I too prefer to follow the advise of our Health officials. I am a severe chronic asthmatic and I find wearing a mask quite comfortable and feel that along with social distancing, I'm doing my part to prevent the spread. Surgeons and healthcare workers have been wearing masks everyday for decades under stressful conditions. If wearing a mask created a health hazard they would have moved on to some other form of PPE.
 

Disrupt

Well-Known Member
That's .6% of FL's population. I don't mean in any way to try to minimize the danger of COVID or the need to take precautions for ourselves and those we interact with.

But I do think its very helpful to put these type of numbers in context.
Noting that a small part of the population had been infected doesn't necessarily downplay the risk. It means that the virus can still infect almost anyone it encounters, so its spread is still unimpeded. When most of the population has been infected, the virus will be unable to find a host in most cases, and its rate of spread will settle to some low endemic value. Another point is that the CDC recently showed that confirmed cases in the US represent only about a tenth of actual cases. Infection rates in the US are currently estimated to be 5%-10% - about a tenth of the way to herd immunity. As one epidemiologist observed, if this were a baseball game, we'd be in the second inning.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Noting that a small part of the population had been infected doesn't necessarily downplay the risk. It means that the virus can still infect almost anyone it encounters, so its spread is still unimpeded. When most of the population has been infected, the virus will be unable to find a host in most cases, and its rate of spread will settle to some low endemic value. Another point is that the CDC recently showed that confirmed cases in the US represent only about a tenth of actual cases. Infection rates in the US are currently estimated to be 5%-10% - about a tenth of the way to herd immunity. As one epidemiologist observed, if this were a baseball game, we'd be in the second inning.
It absolutely does speak to risk and it absolutely is, IMO, needed for proper context.

You are welcome to your own views on this subject.
 

Disrupt

Well-Known Member
It absolutely does speak to risk and it absolutely is, IMO, needed for proper context.

You are welcome to your own views on this subject.
Just pointing out that even more context is helpful. A few pages back, you correctly questioned that we were at greater risk now than in March. The reason was that risk is proportional to the number of active infections, not cumulative infections. The same is true in this context. A few years from now, when most of the population has been infected, those who haven't will likely be at lower risk than they are now. That's because most of those infections will have resolved, and the rate of new infections will likely be low and stable.

Is herd immunity even possible.
Herd immunity is clearly in question, but there's relatively little data on antibodies, and the contribution of memory cells seems uncertain. If there's no herd immunity and no vaccine, we'd basically be stuck with another cold virus - except one that's potentially fatal.
 

Baron23

Well-Known Member
Just pointing out that even more context is helpful. A few pages back, you correctly questioned that we were at greater risk now than in March. The reason was that risk is proportional to the number of active infections, not cumulative infections. The same is true in this context. A few years from now, when most of the population has been infected, those who haven't will likely be at lower risk than they are now. That's because most of those infections will have resolved, and the rate of new infections will likely be low and stable.


Herd immunity is clearly in question, but there's relatively little data on antibodies, and the contribution of memory cells seems uncertain. If there's no herd immunity and no vaccine, we'd basically be stuck with another cold virus - except one that's potentially fatal.
The bald number posted of 130K has absolutely no meaning in isolation.

A 130K cases among 21M Floridians absolutely talks to risk and probability. Yes, active infections would be an even better (and much smaller) number but I don't know that anybody has that figure.

As a contrast, 130K cases among the 216K population in Des Moines, Iowa is a very different kettle of fish and also would absolutely speak to probability and risk.

I think I really hate this thread.
 

Disrupt

Well-Known Member
The bald number posted of 130K has absolutely no meaning in isolation.

A 130K cases among 21M Floridians absolutely talks to risk and probability. Yes, active infections would be an even better (and much smaller) number but I don't know that anybody has that figure.

As a contrast, 130K cases among the 216K population in Des Moines, Iowa is a very different kettle of fish and also would absolutely speak to probability and risk.

I think I really hate this thread.
Don't hate this thread! Addressing your earlier question led to an improved understanding of the irrelevance of cumulative cases to risk, reducing concern. A good example of the value of listening to people with different, but valid, perspectives. A rough estimate of the number of active infections can come from the number of new cases in the past two weeks, about the time it takes for a case of COVID to resolve.
 

Helios

Well-Known Member
I think I really hate this thread
Tell us how u really feel :tongue:
But seriously idk I'm with ya, it's a marginal number in some cases, but some of these states are getting a 50 % increase in CV numbers now in June/July! Reference back to Dr. Henry Nimans site i posted back a few, his stats don't lie and he updates it regularly.. https://recombinomics.co

Let's rip a bowl OK
 
Last edited:

Sponsored by

PuffItUp Dynavap VGoodiez 420EDC
Top